Introduction

Over time, a four wheeler is exposed to many types of weather as well as dust, dirt, and mud. Throughout many years, dirt and grit builds up inside a carburetor and causes the device to malfunction. When a carburetor stops working properly, the engine does not get the right amount of gas and air it needs to run properly. As a result, a four wheeler ceases to start when it is cranked.

Fortunately, however, relatively inexpensive carburetor repair kits can be ordered online so that individuals can fix the carburetor themselves. Repairing a carburetor involves three main steps: loosening and taking the carburetor out of the four wheeler, taking the carburetor apart to clean it and replace the worn-out parts (which are included in the kit), and, finally, reassembling the carburetor before mounting it back on the four wheeler.

In this repair guide, we will first show you how to disconnect and remove the carburetor from the four wheeler, and then we will show you how to thoroughly clean and replace its worn-out parts.

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  • Press the latch on the back right side of the four wheeler seat to remove the seat.

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Image 1/2: Make sure you never disconnect the positive terminal of the battery before the negative terminal. Image 2/2: Make sure you never disconnect the positive terminal of the battery before the negative terminal.
  • As a safety precaution, use a Phillips screwdriver to disconnect the negative battery terminal.

  • Make sure you never disconnect the positive terminal of the battery before the negative terminal.

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  • Use a ratchet with a 10 mm socket to loosen the clamp that connects the carburetor to the intake manifold.

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Image 1/2: There are about 10 rivets to remove. Image 2/2: There are about 10 rivets to remove.
  • Use a flat blade screwdriver to pry and remove the rivets securing both of the side panels so that you will be able to easily access the carburetor.

  • There are about 10 rivets to remove.

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  • Use a T30 Torx screwdriver to remove the screw securing the black plastic panel on the left side of the four wheeler.

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  • Use a wrench with a 10 mm socket to remove the hex bolt that secures the green plastic panel on the right side of the four wheeler.

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Image 1/1: Pull the gas line with your fingers to disconnect it from the engine.
  • Be sure the fuel tank cutoff on the left side of the four wheeler is set to the OFF position before removing the gas line, or gas will spew out everywhere!

  • Pull the gas line with your fingers to disconnect it from the engine.

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  • Remove the plastic rivet that connects the air-intake tube to the metal frame of the four wheeler.

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  • Pull the air-intake tube backwards away from the air filter box.

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  • Use a 10 mm socket wrench to remove the screw on the right hand side of the bottom of the black air filter box.

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  • At this point, the black air filter box should be loose. Lift the air filter box vertically out of the four wheeler.

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  • Use your fingers to pull the gas line off of the carburetor.

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  • Use your fingers to disconnect the vacuum line from the carburetor.

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Image 1/2: Be gentle so you do not break the plastic connector. Image 2/2: You will probably have to pry the clip on the connector with a small flat blade screwdriver to separate the two halves of the connector.
  • Disconnect the electrical sensor connector located on the top frame of the right side of the four wheeler.

  • Be gentle so you do not break the plastic connector.

  • You will probably have to pry the clip on the connector with a small flat blade screwdriver to separate the two halves of the connector.

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  • Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the screw that secures the black cover on the right side of the carburetor.

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  • Twist the spring-loaded mechanism located underneath the black cover that was just removed in the previous step in order to loosen and slip the throttle cable out of the inside of the carburetor.

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  • Remove the choke cable attached to the carburetor by twisting the carburetor around to unscrew it.

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  • At this point, the carburetor should be fully disconnected. Lift the carburetor up out of the four wheeler and gently place it on a table where it can be further disassembled.

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Image 1/2: When you take this screw out, be careful that you do not lose the spring underneath it. Image 2/2: When you take this screw out, be careful that you do not lose the spring underneath it.
  • Use the Phillips screwdriver to remove the two screws holding the primer assembly on the carburetor.

  • When you take this screw out, be careful that you do not lose the spring underneath it.

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Image 1/3: After you remove the metal cover, pull out the spring and rubber bellows that was underneath it. Image 2/3: Be sure to remember the position of the vacuum holder highlighted in the picture so that you can put it back in the same position later. Image 3/3: Be sure to remember the position of the vacuum holder highlighted in the picture so that you can put it back in the same position later.
  • Use a Phillips screwdriver to unscrew the four screws that secure the top metal cover of the carburetor, and remove the cover.

  • After you remove the metal cover, pull out the spring and rubber bellows that was underneath it.

  • Be sure to remember the position of the vacuum holder highlighted in the picture so that you can put it back in the same position later.

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  • Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the four screws that secure the float-bowl assembly.

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  • Use a punch or small flat blade screwdriver to drive out the pin holding the float and lift the float out.

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Image 1/2: Rinse the parts with water from a garden hose. Image 2/2: Rinse the parts with water from a garden hose.
  • Thoroughly spray the disassembled carburetor pieces with Super Clean and scrub everything with a toothbrush.

  • Rinse the parts with water from a garden hose.

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  • Use an air compressor to blow air through all of the openings in the carburetor to dry it.

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Image 1/2: Be careful not to get carburetor cleaner on your skin or eyes or breathe it in. Image 2/2: Be careful not to get carburetor cleaner on your skin or eyes or breathe it in.
  • Thoroughly spray carburetor cleaner all over the outside, inside, and openings of the carburetor.

  • Be careful not to get carburetor cleaner on your skin or eyes or breathe it in.

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  • Unscrew and replace the idle speed adjustment screw and spring provided in the carburetor kit.

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Image 1/2: Be sure to take note of the number of turns that the screw is initially screwed in, as this is the factory adjusted idle air for the four wheeler; you will want to put this screw in the exact same position when you screw the new needle in. Image 2/2: Be sure to take note of the number of turns that the screw is initially screwed in, as this is the factory adjusted idle air for the four wheeler; you will want to put this screw in the exact same position when you screw the new needle in.
  • Use a flat blade screwdriver to unscrew and replace the idle air adjustment needle along with its rubber o-rings provided in the carburetor kit.

  • Be sure to take note of the number of turns that the screw is initially screwed in, as this is the factory adjusted idle air for the four wheeler; you will want to put this screw in the exact same position when you screw the new needle in.

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  • Use a flat blade screwdriver to unscrew and replace the carburetor jet provided in the carburetor kit.

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  • Use a flat blade screwdriver to unscrew and replace the orifice highlighted in the photo.

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  • Use a flat blade screwdriver to unscrew and replace the orifice shown in the photo.

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  • Use a flat blade screwdriver to unscrew and replace the orifice shown in the photo.

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Image 1/3: Use pliers to re-attach the float to the carburetor by pressing in the float pin. Image 2/3: Use pliers to re-attach the float to the carburetor by pressing in the float pin. Image 3/3: Use pliers to re-attach the float to the carburetor by pressing in the float pin.
  • Replace the float inlet needle and spring provided in the carburetor kit.

  • Use pliers to re-attach the float to the carburetor by pressing in the float pin.

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  • Remove the old gasket from the float bowl assembly and replace it with the new gasket provided in the kit.

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Conclusion

There are other optional parts included in the kit that you can replace if they are worn-out on your specific carburetor. Once you have finished replacing all of the old parts, reassemble your device by following these instructions in reverse order.

MASConsultants

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