Updated version of the original iPad 2, released in March of 2012 with a smaller die processor and updated internal construction. Repair will require the use of heat and careful prying.

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Digitizer connectors broken, solder pads on board damaged

When replacing the digitizer, the connectors came apart. I had a gentleman in Kentucky check it and he planned on placing jumper wires from the test points to the connectors.

The repair was only partly successful. Some of the wires are broken. I don't know if it was in shipping or what, and its irrelevant to me. I am an experienced Electronics repair technician but am a bit out of practice, especially with micro soldering.

I would like to give it a go, but I need a diagram showing which test points connect to which pins on the connectors.

I have the schematics, a good work bench, some dated but very functional equipment, and would love to try.

Can you help?

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@novaguy start by posting a couple of good images of your repair, damage, pads etc. with your question. That will allow us to see what you see. Use this guide Adding images to an existing question to post some images.

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The jumper wires should have been properly solidified on the logic board to avoid this kind of problem. Even a minor drop could break the fragile solder joints.

If you want to do this yourself, my only recommendation would be to not underestimate the challenge. The scales involved are truly minuscule. Practice on some other boards if you can first to see if your tools and skills are ready for the task at hand.

If you have the schematics, then you have everything you need. Figure out what the connector connects to and then look at the board-view to see where that is. You will need very small gauge wire. I use 36 or 42AWG. The old wire wrap wire (30 AWG) is usually too big.

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As you said, very delicate work. I've been repairing Electronics for 35 years, but this is the smallest I've ever done.

I thought a control processor on a VCR was fun! 64 pins on a chip the size of a postal stamp.

This was a matter of angles. The guy who worked on it before used #36 but didn't secure it. He put electric tape under and over and called it good.

This is much better.

Thank you for the suggestion and help.

Best Regards

Leo Thurston

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Brad Thurston will be eternally grateful.
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