Heavy-Duty Suction Cups (Pair)

$14.95

Product code: IF145-023-2

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Heavy-Duty Suction Cups (Pair)

$14.95

Product code: IF145-023-2

Product Overview

Get a heavy-duty grip on heavy-duty glass.

  • Large glass panels rarely come with handles—use these suction cups to safely lift and remove glass from LCD screens.
  • Ideal for gaining entry into iMacs and glass-sheathed laptop displays.
  • For smaller displays, like those found in iPhones and iPods, check out our Small Suction Cup.

Product Details

  $14.95 Blue

 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

One year warranty

50+ Available

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Product Videos

 

Stories

My Problem

Failed power supply on Mac Desktop Model A1225.

My Fix

Very well, as it should!

My Advice

No

My Problem

Fried i-Mac due to massive power surge spike; indication suggested power supply shot.

My Fix

Initially thought PC gone to IT heaven with all my data as had my back up hard drive due to the same event.

Googled and found iFixit YouTube video of pretty geeky bespectacled blonde lady video showing step by step dismantling of the same model iMac. It looked easy enough. Ordered parts and tools from iFixit which arrived exactly one week from US to remote outback Australia.

My Advice

Excited but with trepidation proceeded to emulate video sequence and 20 minutes later ready & hit power button and.....nothing black screen!

Dismayed made a coffee then came back to the machine ready to strip it down again then noticed oopsy power cord not connected! Connected and and switched on voila it worked perfectly.

A big thank you iFixit and geeky blonde lady :)

My Problem

I got back from Holiday in New Zealand and turned on my Imac it ran for an hour or so. I stepped out and when I returned it had a white screen and nothing would happen. I rang apple and they got me to try a few things and it still didnt work. I ended up taking it to the local Apple store in Watford. They said because it was a 2009 model it was vintage and they couldn't get any parts. They suggested I go to a specialist apple repair store which I did. After 2 weeks they rang me and said it is completely broken and cant be fixed.

I then decided that I would give it a go myself and started with the hard drive. I looked at the internet and thanks to the Ifixit site I decided I would get the recommended hard drive and try it myself.

My Fix

It was scary to pull the IMac apart however I had watched the video a number of times and followed the instructions. I managed to swap the hard drive and then create the USB boot drive as per intructions. After some fiddling around with the format I manged to install OSX 10.10 in the new drive. My computer has been running fine ever since.

My Advice

Dont believe everything they tell you at the store. I manged to save myself a fortune on a new IMac by fixing this one. Its running just fine now. I was really scared at first but managed to do it all myself and all under $200.

Give it a go. If its broken it cant hurt to try

My Problem

My iMac's original 250 GB hard drive failed. Since it was a 2008 model, full repair at a service center would cost more than the computer was worth. Aside from the HD, it was in pristine condition & had an Intel processor that could handle the latest version of OSX (Yosemite), so I felt it still had some life in it. I bought a 2 TB drive from IFIXIT and installed it myself. I also upgraded the RAM while I was at it. I'm happy I did it!

My Fix

The repair went well. The overview video and step by step directions are extremely well done - clear & thorough, with tech notes that point out helpful little things that only a full time computer tech would know.

My Advice

I'm detail oriented by nature. Whenever I follow any kind of written or video instructions, I usually find things that could be presented better. You guys do such an impressive job that I have nothing to say but THANKS!

My Problem

2008 iMac was getting increasingly slow. No problems diagnosed—it was just getting old, taking ages to open applications—and driving me nuts. I was nervous about putting an SSD into my iMac—having to remove the screen, etc.—seemed a bit daunting.

My Fix

Had the whole job done within an hour. So much easier than I expected it to be. (I've put an SSD in a MacBook Pro too which was more tricky by comparison). My iMac is now like brand new. Incredibly fast. I'm really, really pleased.

My Advice

Just follow iFixit's instructions. The photos, the written steps, the feedback from other users......superb help. Thank you iFixit!

My Problem

After loading Yosemite and more and more documents and programs the imac mid 2010 worked in some parts to slow and with irregularities. So in a first step I doubled the RAM from 4 to 8 GB. The actual next step was to increase the storage capacity from a 0.5 HD to a 2 TB SSD Hybrid 3.5".

My Fix

I worked me through - would say the best. Aside my laptop with the super guide in front - and the fine helper hands of my wife...because the cable connectors are to small for big fingers. I helped me too with a little tool. Surprised I was when despite of much care the "display data connection cable" came away itself because this cable is a little stiff. I really took care by opening the display board! The sense of the plastic pull tab there I didn't understand really. The LCD thermal sensor connection cable was taped to the fan case. (I didn't tape it again when I built all together). The "display data connection cable" I could plug in again by patience.

My Advice

In any case: After 2 hours the imac was fitted again together and works now since one week perfect, will say in his "old youth".

Siegfried's Story Photo #463270

My Problem

Old HD got too full

My Fix

Everything went as smooth as can be, until...

My Advice

Upon reconnecting all of the cables to my new 2 TB Enterprise grade HD I discovered that the thermal cable plug on my iMac had 4 slots but only 2 were used, 1 black wire and 1 gray wire. The problem was that I could NOT connect this to my HD because the remaining 2 blank slots had no holes or openings for the pins of the HD to go through. My remedy was to clear out the thin plastic webbing with the same paper clip I used to lift the LED screen out with. See photo. In my opinion, this info MUST be included in the guide. Hope this helps...

Eric's Story Photo #461333

My Problem

Okay, not a real war--my iMac has not accompanied me on any of my sojourns to Iraq. However, I am an instructor at a military school and my iMac is key to my ability to Photoshop maps and news articles in order to put my students in fictitious wars around the world. I came in off the Christmas holiday break and found that my 2008 iMac 24" (EMC 2211) would not power up. I was heartbroken to say the least. I have a government computer (Windows) but can't install any of my own software and so wouldn't have key tools for doing my job. I tried swapping power cords, trying a different outlet, removing and reinstalling the RAM--you name it, I tried it. Unsure of whether it might be the power supply or the logic board (after Googling to see what the common causes of this problem were), I went to see the folks at the Genius Bar, only to be told that they couldn't do any repair work on it and therefore couldn't really tell me what the problem was. So I decided to try the power supply repair, since it seemed most likely and was cheaper than the logic board (a logic board repair would probably have caused me to replace it instead).

My Fix

The repair was slow--but only because I had to wait several days for the replacement power supply to come in (the lingering effects of the holiday shipping surge). iFixit hadn't had the part on hand, so I went through Galaxy Hardware (galaxyhp.com) for the replacement part. Since I had my new Pro Tech Toolkit (which did arrive very quickly thanks to iFixit's speedy shipping), I decided to do the disassembly work anyway. This gave me the opportunity to clean the inside of the machine and to see if I could diagnose the problem even before the part arrived. Disassembly, using the Hard Drive replacement guide for the general steps and iFixit's supplement for removing the power supply, made the process easy. Since I had the iMac open, I was able to reconnect the power, right after getting the glass and bezel off, to check the diagnostic LEDs. No lights at all, which I guess could still have been either because of a bad power supply or a REALLY bad logic board, but that gave me confidence that I was on the right track. The toughest part was removing the LCD panel power ribbon cable from the bottom of the power supply, but an extra set of hands (provided by my lovely wife) helped steady the panel while I wrestled the cable. Once everything, including the old power supply, was removed, I gently vacuumed out all of the dust, and then replaced the bezel (with only a couple of screws) and the glass. When my part came in a few days later, I was able to install the new power supply and reassemble the iMac in only 30 min or so. I noticed immediately that the new power supply was a bit different than the old. While the old power supply had two heat sinks along its left-side edge, the new one did not. The package did, however, contain a rubber block that screwed into place and channeled the air that would have flowed over these two heat sinks back under the rest of the power supply. Before replacing the bezel and glass, I hooked up the power and, lo and behold, I had that magic diagnostic LED showing that the power supply was working. Let there be light! Let there be Joy!!

My Advice

You definitely need a second set of hands to handle the LCD panel while you disconnect the LCD power ribbon cable. If you lift the panel and set it on its left edge just above the iMac (assuming you have the iMac laying on its back) you should have enough slack in the ribbon to be able to remove the four screws holding the power supply in place so that you can lift it and THEN remove the power cable to the LCD. I didn't try this during disassembly, but I did leave the power supply loose while I reconnected the LCD power cable and then screwed it into place. I can't imagine reconnected that ribbon cable after the power supply had been screwed down.

My Problem

The problem started with the bootcamp partition having damaged system files. I initially resolved by reinstalling Windows. This lasted for a bit but then it started having problems again. This time the OS X side stated having problems. It would startup since the OS was on the SSD of the fusion drive but data drive (started clicking) was an issue.

My Fix

By slowing using the iMac screen removal tool and the suction cups I was able to separate and pivot the glass screen up in order to remove the failed drive. Following iFixit's guides made the repair a breeze. I have fixed a few broken iPhone/iPod screens so I am not a complete novice and this was even easier then working on the tiny screws, etc. in the mobile devices. I took my time and was careful not to damage the large glass so it took about 1 1/2 hours to complete, including starting the iMac before completely closing up the screen.

I bought the replacement Hard Drive on Amazon and for about $30 more ended up adding an additional 1 terabyte.

My Advice

Take your time in separating the glass from the case. I used old used gift/gas cards to help in the separation. Instead of completely separating the screen I just pivot it up on the bottom edge and used a flat cardboard box to prop it up. This saved me time in the reassembly. Also make sure the power wire to the speaker is completely separated from the track in the speaker before removing the speaker.

Does anyone know how I can recover some of the data from the failed clicking hard drive or is this any impossible task since it was part of the fusion drive?

My Problem

We were running out of disk space with our 500 GB disk on our late-2009 iMac, and I was fed up managing content on external USB drives.

My Fix

It was actually quite easy. It only took about 45 minutes and my 12 year old daughter did most of the work. The guide for the EMC 2308 was spot on for my iMac, which is an EMC 2551. Recovering the machine from the Time Machine backup on a USB drive worked fine, although it did take 4 hours to copy the nearly 500 GB of data over USB 2.0. We also took advantage to take out and take apart the DVD super drive to clean the lens (it stopped working years ago).

My Advice

Make sure to make the last Time Machine backup before shutting down!

After the repair, when the iMac is first restarted with the new disk, the disk repair utility comes up but the new disk was not visible. Before you can restore the data from the backup, you have use the Disk Utility to format (or reformat) the new disk to the Mac Journaled FS using the "first aid" utility. Then, the new disk shows up as one of the disks that can be used as the destination for recovery.

There was one minor hiccup. Although everything was installed properly after the recovery from the backup, MS Office asked for the license key when I tried to use it. I had to dig it out of my email archives. So keep such software keys handy because they are apparently associated to the HW Id of the disk somehow.