Video Overview

Introduction

Apple's gone and skipped its iPhone "S" update, so we followed suit and skipped ahead a couple timezones. We're here at Circuitwise headquarters in Sydney, Australia, bringing you the iPhone 8 teardown (and the 8 Plus too!) as early as you can get it. Time to find out if Apple's playing a game of mere numerical catch-up to Samsung’s Galaxy S8 line, or if glass backing and wireless charging warrants skipping ahead a grade. Let’s crack the front and back open it up to see!

Come for the teardowns, stay for the repair goodness! Check us out on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to stay up-to-date on all things repair!

This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your iPhone 8, use our service manual.

The 8 has some slick new tech, but is it enough to warrant the upgraded digit? You be the judge:
  • The 8 has some slick new tech, but is it enough to warrant the upgraded digit? You be the judge:

    • A11 Bionic chip with embedded M11 motion coprocessor

    • 64 or 256 GB onboard storage capacity

    • 4.7-inch IPS multitouch Retina HD display with 1334 × 750 resolution (326 ppi)

    • 12 MP camera with ƒ/1.8 aperture, optical image stabilization, and 5x digital zoom

    • 7 MP FaceTime HD camera with ƒ/2.2 aperture and 1080p HD recording capability

    • Support for fast-charge and Qi wireless charging

    • 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi‑Fi w/MIMO + Bluetooth 5.0 + NFC

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As we start our teardownunder we're greeted by a now-familiar face. Features include: Solid-state home "button" with Touch ID fingerprint sensor. A (still) IPS display similar to the one we found in the iPhone 7 (but now featuring True Tone).
  • As we start our teardownunder we're greeted by a now-familiar face. Features include:

    • Solid-state home "button" with Touch ID fingerprint sensor.

    • A (still) IPS display similar to the one we found in the iPhone 7 (but now featuring True Tone).

  • On the backside, we spy the iPhone's snazzy new glass backing with its seven-layer color finish.

    • Apple assures everyone that this rear panel is reinforced with "an internal laser-welded steel and copper structure," but time and durability tests will tell if this phone will suffer from a snap, crackle, pop—or yet another Bendgate.

    • Jury is still out on the model number and the missing wheely-bin symbol.

  • Finally, before getting to work, we take a second to line up our new gold iPhone 8 and yesteryear's rose gold 6s. Apple has certainly refined (and re-refined) this design, in addition to stripping a little pink from the finish.

Square Trade break testing didn’t show very good results. The verdict: iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus are definitely not very durable (although both phones beat the Note 8).

And I understand the back is not covered under insurance as well.

“Square Trade gave the iPhone 8 a breakability score of 67, the iPhone 8 Plus a breakability score of 74, and the Galaxy Note 8 a breakability score of 80. At 67 and 74, iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are at "medium risk" of breakage from a drop, while the Galaxy Note 8 is at "high risk." The Galaxy Note 8 fared worse because it was non-functional after some of the tests, while the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus remained usable despite the broken glass. “

Rick Mizell - Reply

Before we excavate, we X-ray! Our pals at Creative Electron came down under to Circuitwise and snagged some stellar sneak peek imagery. The seamless back gives way to some intricate insides. The first thing we spy is the brand new wireless charging coil!
  • Before we excavate, we X-ray!

  • The seamless back gives way to some intricate insides. The first thing we spy is the brand new wireless charging coil!

    • More on that later. For now, we put down the X-ray goggles to plan our attack.

  • Turns out you don't need X-ray vision to see the model number on this blank-backed phone—it's here on the rosy gold box—A1863!

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  • Time to get this teardown underway. After twirling away the pentalobe screws, we need some heat as an antidote to the waterproof display seals.

  • iOpener—bam! Seals softened. Next we pull the iSclack out of our tool bag for some pulling power, and slice through the adhesive with a little help from our friends opening picks.

  • ... and we're in! A first glance reveals nothing new—yet. But we've only just scratched the glassy surface.

Jut as we expected so far.

Phillip - Reply

at this point, fingers crossed that the iPhone 7 display will also work, just like the S and SE are compatible!!

Nathan Prodell - Reply

As we crack open this book display, we are greeted by the familiar display cable bracket. But instead of the cursed tri-point screws, we're happy to report that we're met with friendly Phillips #000 screws! We can't say that we will miss you, tri-points. We quickly decouple a few cables—the battery, display, and home button cables to be exact—and the display is free!
  • As we crack open this book display, we are greeted by the familiar display cable bracket. But instead of the cursed tri-point screws, we're happy to report that we're met with friendly Phillips #000 screws!

  • We quickly decouple a few cables—the battery, display, and home button cables to be exact—and the display is free!

  • We note a lack of gaskets on the display's pentalobe tabs, which was previously seen in the iPhone 7.

    • However, both the iPhone 7 and iPhone 8 have an IP67 water resistance rating. How are the floodgates still closed!?

So an 1822mah battery?

mr_skot_a - Reply

Is the iPhone 8 LCD assembly the same as an iPhone 7? Are the parts cross-compatible for repairs?

aq.nguyen87 - Reply

Gaskets (aka “boots” in apple-speak) on the pentalobe tabs (aka “fangs” in apple-speak) were never meant to provide water resistance. They were on the & for another purpose

Product Designer - Reply

We make a grab for the battery's stretch-release adhesive strips, and find there are two more of these guys than we're used to. But that's okay—we just ask for a hand (or two), and remove all four at once! This procedure requires a wealth of experience, gained in large part due to Stretch Armstrong.
  • We make a grab for the battery's stretch-release adhesive strips, and find there are two more of these guys than we're used to.

  • But that's okay—we just ask for a hand (or two), and remove all four at once!

    • This procedure requires a wealth of experience, gained in large part due to Stretch Armstrong.

  • We easily throw back the mozzarella sticks pull tabs as the battery springs free effortlessly.

You need to remove the vibe (“taptic engine”) and any other nearby, sharp components before pulling the adhesive tabs.

-PD Engineer

Product Designer - Reply

Now that this juicy battery pack is out, we can see how it compares to its competitors! Fully topped off, this 3.82 V, 1821 mAh cell will deliver up to 6.96 Wh of power.
  • Now that this juicy battery pack is out, we can see how it compares to its competitors!

  • Fully topped off, this 3.82 V, 1821 mAh cell will deliver up to 6.96 Wh of power.

    • To compare Apples to Apples, the iPhone 7 featured a 7.45 Wh battery.

    • And for reference, the similarly-spec'd Galaxy S8 packs a 11.55 Wh battery.

  • Before you get hopping mad about battery news: despite the drop in capacity, Apple claims battery life will be comparable to last year’s unit.

They always claim that… It's never realistic though when doing video tests etc.

djlobb01 - Reply

Are the physical dimensions of this battery the same as the iPhone 7 battery? It would be interesting if you could swap this one for the high capacity iPhone 7 battery.

Simon Seeber - Reply

fyi the battery’s are expanding in the cases :P

Kyle Johnston - Reply

  • We pluck the main camera in pursuit of the logic board.

    • The iPhone 8 has the same ƒ/1.8, 6-element lens that we saw on the iPhone 7, but everything else about the camera is new and improved.

    • The 8's sensor is bigger than the 7's, but specs the same 12 MP resolution. This means the individual pixels are larger—letting in more light, improving colors, and decreasing noise.

    • But wait, there's more! Improved image processing software shows Apple still has a few clever tricks up its sleeve.

  • We've seen this before, but not with the naked eye! Neat X-rays reveal magnets in the four corners of the camera—giving this camera some advanced vision of its own through OIS.

Could you measure the sensor size? Or at least compare iPhone 7 and iPhone 8 sensor on the X-ray?

Aidan - Reply

Rumor has it that iPhone 8 has sensor size of 1/2.0 inch…true?

Madtiger - Reply

Yes! The sensor size please!

Noofyz INoofyz - Reply

is the camera lens made by sony?

ryan buenaflor - Reply

  • As our quest continues, we find some quirky cables and brackets!

  • First out: a new Lightning port bracket that seems to reinforce the new peach-colored port and trap the Taptic engine.

    • Up to now, we've gleefully plugged along with our Phillips screwdriver—but alas, all good things must come to an end. In removing this bracket, we encountered our first tri-point screw. Still, it's no match for our 64 Bit Driver Kit!

    • We suspect that the newly colored Lightning port could be made of a heat-transferring plastic to allow for safer fast-charging. (Or, it could just be color-matched to the chassis.)

    • Next: a strange interconnect/antenna cable over the speaker.

    • Finally: the Taptic Engine nestled in a series of tiny fiddly connectors.

Fairly obviously you would have to use the 64 Bit Driver kit, as the new iOS is no longer 32 Bit compatible. :-)

David Reidy - Reply

The final barrier to logic board gold: this tiny hidden screw, which we find trapped under the waterproof silicone seals! We get another helping hand in the form of Jumpy's for logic board removal!
  • The final barrier to logic board gold: this tiny hidden screw, which we find trapped under the waterproof silicone seals!

  • We get another helping hand in the form of Jumpy's for logic board removal!

  • Kangaroo-shaped, chicken-flavored snacks aside, we hope you're not jumpy for the iPhone X. Reports say that production could start as late as mid-October—meaning the 8 could be the hardware of choice for early upgraders as well as those in Apple's Upgrade Program.

It would not to be waterproof silicone seals! Seems like to be a stable cushion(sponge/poron) for board to board connector.

Victor Huang - Reply

Drumroll please—it's chip time! Special thanks to the folks at TechInsights for helping scope out this silicon: Apple 339S00434 A11 Bionic SoC layered over SK Hynix H9HKNNNBRMMUUR 2 GB LPDDR4x RAM Qualcomm MDM9655 Snapdragon X16 LTE modem
  • Drumroll please—it's chip time! Special thanks to the folks at TechInsights for helping scope out this silicon:

    • Apple 339S00434 A11 Bionic SoC layered over SK Hynix H9HKNNNBRMMUUR 2 GB LPDDR4x RAM

    • Qualcomm MDM9655 Snapdragon X16 LTE modem

    • Skyworks SkyOne SKY78140

    • Avago 8072JD130

    • P215 730N71T - likely an envelope tracking IC

    • Skyworks 77366-17 quad-band GSM power amplifier module

    • NXP 80V18 secure NFC module

Is SK Hynix H9HKNNNBRMMUUR “LPDDR4x” not “LPDDR4”?

JJ Wu - Reply

Shouldn’t the A11 be identified as a SoC, not a CPU, with model number of APL1W72 instead of 339S00434?

RichardP - Reply

SK Hynix H9HKNNNBRMMUUR should be LPDDR4x.

Refer to the link https://www.skhynix.com/eng/support/tech...

There is one documentation related to chip marking about LPDDR4. From the marking information, H9HKNNNBRMMUUR should be LPDDR4x.

JJ Wu - Reply

And on the back side: Apple/USI 170804 339S00397 WiFi/Bluetooth module
  • And on the back side:

    • Apple/USI 170804 339S00397 WiFi/Bluetooth module

    • Apple 338S00248, 338S00309 PMIC, and S3830028

    • Toshiba TSBL227VC3759 64 GB NAND flash storage

    • Qualcomm WTR5975 Gigabit LTE RF transceiver and PMD9655 PMIC

    • Broadcom 59355—Likely an iteration of BCM59350 wireless charging IC

    • NXP 1612A1—Likely an iteration of the 1610 tristar IC

    • Skyworks 3760 3576 1732 RF Switch and SKY762-21 247296 1734 RF Switch

FM Radio? *screams like Flanders with purple drapes*

Alvaro - Reply

What do you mean FM Radio ?

forrest gump - Reply

Logic board dispatched, we get down to brass tacks plastic bits. Today's bits feature the speaker and barometric vent. As we learned last year, this barometric vent allows your iPhone to accurately gauge your altitude, while maintaining a watertight seal.
  • Logic board dispatched, we get down to brass tacks plastic bits. Today's bits feature the speaker and barometric vent.

    • As we learned last year, this barometric vent allows your iPhone to accurately gauge your altitude, while maintaining a watertight seal.

  • Another small spec bump: Apple touts that the speakers are 25% louder in the iPhone 8—although there is some debate as to whether it is noticeable.

  • The same dozen donut speaker holes line the bottom of this iPhone as the 7.

  • We also find familiar signs of waterproofing in the form of seals and little rubber gaskets.

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The rear case is looking a little thin on components, but we still find a few pieces that invite inquiry. The peach-colored Lightning connector looks like it has changed a li'l since the iPhone 7. Without getting distracted by the desert camo, we notice a new form factor. Better ingress protection, mayhaps? We dig through some black tape that covers some copper tape that covers some black tape ... wait a second ...
  • The rear case is looking a little thin on components, but we still find a few pieces that invite inquiry.

  • The peach-colored Lightning connector looks like it has changed a li'l since the iPhone 7. Without getting distracted by the desert camo, we notice a new form factor. Better ingress protection, mayhaps?

  • We dig through some black tape that covers some copper tape that covers some black tape ... wait a second ...

    • That ain't just black tape, it's the elusive Apple-branded, Qi (pronounced "chee")-enabled wireless charging coil!

    • This coil uses an oscillating magnetic field to generate an alternating current. The alternating current is then converted to direct current—the magic juice that fuels the battery.

rumor is there are two generations of the Wireless Charging Coil out on the street. Samsung flagships opting for the faster one and iPhone 8 opting for the slower one. Any truth to that?

bluinc - Reply

Has the Qi chip been identified yet?

bigboy101 - Reply

It’s Broadcom BCM59355.

JJ Wu -

From the Qi Certified List found at: https://www.wirelesspowerconsortium.com/...

iPhone 8 (A1863) Basic Power Profile (5 Watt), Version 1.2.3; max received power 5 W

The Samsung Note 8 has the same BPP (5watt), Version 1.2.3, but max power received is 4.5 W

The LG V30 has an Extended Power Profile (15 Watt), Version 1.2.3, max power received 10.5 W

Yoron - Reply

  • We take a stab at separating the rear glass, but after a lot of heat and wetwork, we've instead shivved our way under the reinforcement panel.

  • After more arduous stabbing, we finally get the seven-layer burrito glass sandwich off of the midframe.

    • This isn't what we thought Apple meant when they said the glass was stronger.

  • The process left the backing plate a bit bent out of shape—we have no idea how Apple plans to do this, but they seem to be keeping the secret squirreled away...

  • And no, we didn't let snails figure-skate on the back—that's glue. Lots of it.

    • This side-by-side reminds us of something we recently noted.

Why don’t you guys start selling heat tables too so you can tell us at what temperature the adhesive starts to melt?

Javan Pohl - Reply

Could you use an LCD separator machine to remove the rear glass? The ones with heated surface with suction and wire - seems like an easier option than the razor blade.

rendallwagner - Reply

We finally turn back to the well-known display and pluck the final features away. Goodbye home button. Goodbye front-facing sensor cable.
  • We finally turn back to the well-known display and pluck the final features away.

    • Goodbye home button.

    • Goodbye front-facing sensor cable.

    • Goodbye LCD shield.

  • Oh, but hey li'l chip we can't identify.

  • Once again, the light sensor is covered by a colored filter, which we believe assists the True Tone system.

So more home button headaches!

Tony Tone - Reply

Maybe the unidentified chip has something to do with Apple’s calibration machine and their attempt to prevent installation of aftermarket screens?? Just a wild conspiracy guess…

Wilf Batty - Reply

Maybe this had been answered on another thread but can someone tell me what the chip on the screen flex cable is for?

JD Salinas - Reply

The chip on the LCD flex is the touch screen controler,as from 6S and further on. As for the unknown chip on the LCD itself-I think it’s the 3D touch controller,also as on the 6S and on.

GSM House - Reply

The LCD driver chip is most likely to be Synaptics R63318 device and it has been continuously used in iPhone6~8, except iPhone X

Brad Hwang - Reply

Did the screen contain any tri-tip screws, or did they revert back to Phillips #000 as well?

rdburkh - Reply

That's all she wrote! Well, at least for now—we've got a few more words and photos in store for you in the next few days! Thanks heaps to Circuitwise for hosting us at their sweet facility in Sydney. (Seriously, check out that sweeet soldering video.) And big thanks to the Creative Electron team for providing some serious X-ray support!
  • That's all she wrote! Well, at least for now—we've got a few more words and photos in store for you in the next few days!

  • Thanks heaps to Circuitwise for hosting us at their sweet facility in Sydney. (Seriously, check out that sweeet soldering video.)

  • And big thanks to the Creative Electron team for providing some serious X-ray support!

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Final Thoughts
  • The two most commonly replaced components, display and battery, remain straightforward to access with the proper knowledge and tools.
  • The addition of wireless charging means less strain on your Lightning port, a common point of failure.
  • Water and dust seals complicate repair, but make the need for difficult liquid damage repairs less likely.
  • The battery connector once again sports common Phillips/JIS fasteners—but you’ll still need up to four different driver types for many repairs.
  • The durability of the glass back remains to be seen—but replacements are likely to be very difficult.
  • The iPhone’s lower components, once readily removed, now lie trapped under a fussy combination of brackets and delicately folded flex cables.
Repairability Score
6
Repairability 6 out of 10
(10 is easiest to repair)

66 Comments

Live stream it on twitch.tv or youtube!

Andrew spoelstra - Reply

Link anyone?

Matt Traynor -

It looks like it's the same screen as the iPhone 7, something like the iPhone 5S and SE, maybe?

Universo Técnico - Reply

Hopefully, although since the new one supports true tone, it may not. However, those sensors may not be integrated into the display and just be a part of the camera and speakerphone assembly.

Edit: also, the black stuff isn't present on any iPhone 7 displays Ive got, also, the top clip on the left side seems to be rounded off, while on my 7 displays, they have a little sharpish point coming out of each side.

Andrew spoelstra -

Also, on the 8 display, there is a little bit of text on a black bit of plastic which reads “F08+C”, on my 8 display, it reads “F06+A”

Edit: also there are metal clips at the top of the 8 display, on the 7 they're made from plastic

Andrew spoelstra -

Vince Gioffre confirmed that it has the same LCD connector, different digi connector. So new LCDs should be different but not expensive. Think 5c vs 5s.

iRevive Mobile -

Waiting for days. Exciting. Awesome!

Jetson - Reply

No video stream?

Darshit Mehta - Reply

Agreed! Stream live please!!

mr_skot_a - Reply

Cool idea on the “Live Teardown”… as always great photography and good explanations.

Far as step 5 (Screen removal). The flex cables look very similar to the iphone 7. From reading the comments above the tech mentions some frame differences. Have you by chance plugged the screen assembly into an iphone 7 to see if the LCD+Digi/3D touch/home button work, and maybe front camera assembly work as well?

iDenver Repairs - Reply

Thank you BTW!

mr_skot_a - Reply

Are there any Liquid Metal components in the frame

Adam G - Reply

Now are 4 Adhesive Strips, at the top and bottom of the battery? The Adhesive Strips, do not stand above the wireless charger, right?

Universo Técnico - Reply

Yup! That’s correct.

Evan Noronha -

Would love to see a shot of the iPhone laying by itself vertically with the display removed and no hands in the frame. Not yet disassembled.

mr_skot_a - Reply

Peel to remove adhesive? Is this new.

duston - Reply

Nope. Been around since the 5S/5C days.

iDenver Repairs -

No this has been in iPhones and iPads for a while to remove the battery. what is new is that their are 4 tabs, previously I believe there were just 2.

Marga Dali -

no update???

萌萌妃 - Reply

Awesome tear down. Thank you.

I see the Qualcomm chip. Is this the A1863 iPhone 8?

henryteichert - Reply

Glad you’re enjoying it, we’re almost done! You’re correct, this is an A1863 iPhone 8.

Andrew Optimus Goldberg -

So wirelless charging is with a flex cable ? , i’m curious about the back glass cover if its removable (easy to) because i’m thinking ill be changing lots of those…

Edit : Seems like they don't want us to change those… how come the aluminum is so deformed? no usage of heat or glue remover used?

J T - Reply

mum mum mum mum

Stephen Yoo - Reply

Awesome teardown. Does iPhone 8 have USB 3.0 Controller?

Chang Guangyu - Reply

Do you plan to follow with iPhone 8 plus? Thanks for sharing this! Made my day

Andrzej trickykid - Reply

Does IPhone 8 support quick charge by USB Type-C and PD

Weng Brian - Reply

All three phones released support USB-C quick charging with a Lighting to USB-C cable and a USB-C charging brick (for MacBook/MacBook Pro w/ TB3).

Jake Contreras -

Apple 338S00248, 338S00309, and S3830028 are Cirrus Logic designed.

drf_13 - Reply

Waiting for iphone X teardown

Hui - Reply

Apple 338S00248, 338S00309, and S3830028

Are any of these the Dialog Power Management IC? Similar serial numbers to Dialog’s chip in the 7 (Dialog 338S00225 Power Management IC)

Cormac Ennis - Reply

TechInsights updated their (8 plus teardown) info to show 338S00309 and 338S00306 as Apple/Dialog and commented that there is one more PMIC from Dialog compared to the 7. The 338S00306 chip isn’t even mentioned in this article. It looks like the chip has tape (or some other covering) over the top of it in the photo on this article so the markings can’t be identified. It would be the chip just below the NXP80V18 secure NFC module. Also, I think one of the orange circled PMIC chips in this article is actually a 338S00295 Audio Amp instead.

Vash Kae -

Any details on the earpiece speaker/Mic as compared to i7

Paresh Desai - Reply

Please what can you say about GNSS chipset (annouced by Apple)? Embedded in MDM9655? Thanks

Francis - Reply

Yes. The iPhone model with Qualcomm modem inside, the GNSS is supported by Qualcomm modem. If it is intel modem inside, there should be a GNSS chip from other other vendor(supposedly, it will be Broadcom.)

JJ Wu -

Does iphone8 has or change in Digital to Analog (DAC) part ? Something like AKM , Wolfsen ,Cirrus logic etc.

lphatcharapol - Reply

I don’t think the P215 730N71T is an ET IC . There is no DC-DC inductor and capacitor around. And it is very unreasonable to place the PAPM so closed to PAs

momo_coder - Reply

Any changes to the top speaker? The “stereo” speakers in my iPhone 7 still have 80% of the volume come out the bottom.

tipoo - Reply

Great teardown. I have been looking forward to this all week! The back glass design reminds me of the iPhone 4 back glass assembly, with the layer of glass being excessively glued to a thin metal plate that was built in to a plastic frame who’s design varied depending on GSM or CDMA model. However, other than adding Qi charging, the difference between the iPhone 4 and iPhone 8 back glass is the location of the thin metal plate. For the iPhone 4, it was attached to the removable back glass assembly. With the iPhone 8, the thin metal plate is built into the phone’s frame assembly. From what I have been reading, Apple store employees claim that a broken glass on the new iPhone 8 series counts as a whole device replacement under AppleCare and therefore subject to a larger fee. I am curious to know if Apple designed these new models to have the entire frame replaced rather than just the back glass to prevent repair shops from providing inevitable back glass repairs.

Esteban Millard - Reply

Is the iPhone 8 LCD assembly the same as an iPhone 7? Are the parts cross-compatible for repairs?

aq.nguyen87 - Reply

Looking forward to your bend test! There appears to be several fake ones on YouTube in which reviewers are using either a six or seven and claiming it to be an 8. One that looks fairly real claims that the 8 is much better than the 7 (perhaps all those layers of glass help). I would like to know if the 8 passes the skinny gene tests.

Bob Powers - Reply

Gee iLuddite, what ever happened to the good old days of electronics when they had huge cabinets and everything could be fixed with a bang of your hand on it? I am constantly sickened by your constant complaining that Apple products that rarely if ever, need repairs are difficult for YOU to repair. Somehow, you expect anyone with no knowledge or experience to be able to also repair ANY electronics on their own.

Robert Evans - Reply

Does anyone know which IMU is in the iPhone 8?

Doug V - Reply

Bosch Sensortec

eisblock -

Lightning connector runs at USB3 speeds yet ?!?!?! apple are such douches when to comes to USB speed increases

ancientscream - Reply

Dude the 7 series ran at USB 3 speeds.

Andrew spoelstra -

Really?! Using the regular lightning cable it came with? I though all those are USB2!

junkmovies -

The iPhone 7 runs at USB 3 speeds? Thats funny because my 2017 Kaby Lake i7 Macbook pro USB-C to lightning cable, and all my other lightning cables, have never transferred to my iPhone 7+ faster than USB 2.0 speeds. 100GB/14,000 songs takes like an hour to transfer?

Tom M -

Data transfer speeds via Lightning adapter is becoming less and less important—the last iTunes update removed iOS apps from iTunes. Apple is pushing more and more data transfers over wireless.

Yoron -

Would like to see the Camera Sensor size compared against the iPhone 7’s.

Gaurav Dey - Reply

Yes please! iFixit help us out and show a comparison of the 7 and 8 main camera sensors? The 8 is supposed to have a bigger sensor.

Mike R -

Are there any unidentified chips that are 3mm x 3mm ?

Vash Kae - Reply

Does anyone know if CYPD2104 also included in IP8 like IPAD PRO?

Ritty - Reply

Yes, there is. Refer to Step 12.

On the PCB photo, right side next to Toshiba chip, there is one chip which chip marking is “CPD2”. The chip is between Toshiba chip, Qualcomm PMD9655 and Apple 338S00248.

JJ Wu -

Does anyone know the main sensor they are using the 8/8Plus? I’ve read that it’s a bigger sensor online with “deeper wells” for capturing data. But no one online has information regarding the model of the sensor or the micron size of the pixels.

Mike R - Reply

Saludos y muchas gracias a esta gran comunidad que día a día se prepara mediante la investigación, observación y experimentación, así se logra la mejora continua y se actualiza el conocimiento y la técnica, muy bien por ello, buenas tardes.

David Molina - Reply

Rumor has it there are two generations of the Wireless Charging Coil out on the street. Samsung flagships opting for the faster one and iPhone 8 opting for the slower one. Any truth to that? What are the specs of each? Having trouble finding them in google-land.

bluinc - Reply

Samsung boasts “Fast charging “, and Apple boasts “Wireless charging “

That sort of settled it for me.

unklbyl -

Both the iPhone 8 and Samsung’s latest (Note 8) utilize Qi’s Basic Power Profile (5 Watt), with the iPhone capable of receiving 5W, and the Note receiving 4.5W. The LG V30 utilizes the Extended Power Profile (15W) capable of receiving 10.5W. This pulled from the Wireless Power Consortium’s certified devices list (the LG V30 page: https://www.wirelesspowerconsortium.com/...) (the iPhone 8 page: https://www.wirelesspowerconsortium.com/...)

The iPhone 8 also supports fast charging—via Apple’s USB-C to Lightning cable (must be USB-C PD) and a compatible wall wart (like Apple’s 29W USB-C wall adapter).

Yoron -

Good )))))))

Deemka - Reply

Sorry I can’t take the TRUE TONE comparison until you do a side by side comparison using same front color iPhone. I believe the black front (over-enhance) enhances true tone and white front deemphasizes it.

Ronald Abrigo - Reply

thanks a lot for all your help.all your tutos are amazing.thanks a lot

Pablo Grau - Reply

Does iphone 8 allow direct transfer of musicvideo from iphone to computer and computer to iphone without itune software.

senata shaha - Reply

the iphone 8 is more like the the iphone 7 just sme few other parts have being introduced but looks so complex i dont know how Apple is trying to solve ##%& that will help save the back glass from getting bent after removed

Steven Baffoe - Reply

Does anyone know the screw size next to the lightning port on the bottom of the phone?

splhcb78 - Reply

If you’re talking about the two exterior screws, they’re the same as in past iPhones—you’ll need a P2 Pentalobe driver to remove them.

Jeff Suovanen -

thanks a lot for all your help. it is good guide, if need some iphone repair tools, can contact with me

Yong Hui - Reply

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