Video Overview

Introduction

Since Apple's announcement day, we've been anxiously awaiting the chance to delve into their latest and greatest tech. Today, we're kicking off our teardown trifecta with the iDevice that boasts both the greatest surface area and the highest number of cameras: the iPhone 7 Plus.

Looking for even more teardown action? Check out our Apple Watch Series 2 teardown for the first look at the cutting edge of wearable tech.

Our teardown trio is just getting started. Follow along on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter for the latest news from the repair world.

This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your iPhone 7 Plus, use our service manual.

Image 1/1: Apple A10 Fusion processor with embedded M10 motion coprocessor
  • There's a lot to learn about what's hidden inside the "best, most advanced iPhone ever"—but first, let's take a moment to review what we already know:

    • Apple A10 Fusion processor with embedded M10 motion coprocessor

    • 32, 128, and 256 GB onboard storage capacity (jet black model not available in 32 GB)

    • 5.5-inch multitouch IPS Retina HD display with 1920 × 1080 pixels (401 ppi)

    • Dual 12 MP wide-angle and telephoto cameras with f/1.8 and f/2.8 apertures (respectively), 2x optical zoom, and 10x digital zoom

    • 7 MP FaceTime HD camera with f/2.2 aperture and 1080p HD recording capability

    • Solid-state Home button with Touch ID, driven by new Taptic Engine

    • 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi‑Fi + MIMO Bluetooth 4.2 + NFC

Which carrier phone is this

deepu272 - Reply

The iPhone 7 plus is much deferent than iPhone 6 and iPhone 6S. The lack of antenna lines especial at the jet black version, the lack of earphone jack, the dual lenses and dual speaker make it distinguishable. I personally like it very much and I will soon buy the iPhone 7 plus jet black 256GByte model. The only thing I dislike is that I won't be able to store my iOS apps on my hard disk as I am doing with my old jailbroken iphone 6 plus. So the 256 Gbytes are more than necessary.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

@Agnostos Gnostos

"The only thing I dislike is that I won't be able to store my iOS apps on my hard disk..."

You can do that using iTunes without jailbreaking. You always could.

alex - Reply

I want to make my iphone at home , but from where i should get the parts ???

can you help me?

please

reply me

Nakul Phulwade - Reply

Image 1/3: The 7 Plus is also stamped with a new model number: A1785. Image 2/3: For those more inclined to the dark side, Apple is now offering matte black and [http://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2016/9/7/12836762/iphone-7-announced-black-scratch|scratchable|new_window=true] jet black versions of the iPhone 7 Plus,  in addition to the already available silver, gold, and rose gold colors. Image 3/3: The 7 Plus also drops some of those [http://www.techinsider.io/iphone-antenna-lines-explained-2015-10|unsightly antenna lines|new_window=true] of old, in favor of a more subtle appearance.
  • The dimensions of the iPhone 7 Plus are identical to those of its predecessor, at 158.2 mm × 77.9 mm × 7.3 mm—and yet it's slightly lighter, at 6.63 oz (vs. the 6s Plus at 6.77 oz). Hopefully Apple didn't remove anything important.

    • The 7 Plus is also stamped with a new model number: A1785.

  • For those more inclined to the dark side, Apple is now offering matte black and scratchable jet black versions of the iPhone 7 Plus, in addition to the already available silver, gold, and rose gold colors.

  • The 7 Plus also drops some of those unsightly antenna lines of old, in favor of a more subtle appearance.

  • Perhaps the most noticeable difference is the Lightning to 3.5 mm headphone jack adapter included in the box. It's going to take some courage for us to move on from the headphone jack. Sorry baby adapter. It's not you, it's us.

Quote: "6.63 oz (vs. the 6s Plus at 6.77 mm)"

I know you meant, "6.77 _oz_"!

biowizard - Reply

have you done a baby teardown on the baby adapter ? Does it have a DAC in it ? If so which one?

Jasraj Vaidya - Reply

No, it's not me, it's "baby adapter" Dongles were a thing of the past, and hated them as much as they will be hated now.

scottwilkins - Reply

The dimensions of the iPhone 7 Plus are identical to those of its predecessor, at 158.2 mm × 77.9 mm × 7.3 mm—and yet it's slightly lighter, at 6.63 oz (vs. the 6s Plus at 6.77 oz). Hopefully Apple didn't remove anything important.... They removed the headphone jack and assembly.

Emma - Reply

I have no courage. I also have no Apple Music because I have no reason to trust Apple with my content.

Dave - Reply

oz... what is oz... You are measuring in mm, so do in Gram, too... 99% of the world does it metric...

Skimmy - Reply

Yes. you're right!

Ricardo Rodríguez -

How about 3.5mm powered accessories like the square? Is square going to ante up for the lightning interface?

refd123 - Reply

I don't believe that the jet black color is so prone to scratches. I generally baby my phone and protect them with cases and glass membranes. So it's not a real issue. The lack of earphone jack isn't a problem. I bet that every manufacturer very soon will produce earphones with lighting jack. Those with very expensive conventional earphones will find the earphone adapter annoying but that isn't a big issue. After all when you are buying a phone at 800 dollars you can spent 100 dollars for decent earphones. Apple as always is removing parts from its iPhones. People forget that the earphone jack of the first generation iphone was small and deep inside. It didn't allow many earphones.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

Do the new antenna lines in the 7 plus iPhone improve the signal reception in poor transmission areas

gaylestan - Reply

@dave.

"I have no courage. I also have no Apple Music because I have no reason to trust Apple with my content."

Apple music is a subscription streaming service. You don't own the content. So you don't need to trust them.

I keep my own content on iTunes match. I do trust them. But it's all safe on my Mac, and backed up too.

alex - Reply

@refd123

'How about 3.5mm powered accessories like the square? Is square going to ante up for the lightning interface?"

The square works off the headphone jack. If they use it to spec, then it should work off the adapter.

alex - Reply

Don't know about A1785,

but on Apple's iPHone specs page they specifiy two 7+ model #'s as A1661 & A1784.

One of them supports CDMA, the other does not.

macnosy - Reply

Image 1/3: Stay tuned for more views of the new iPhone's internals courtesy of our X-ray X-perts! Image 2/3: What advantage does the superpower of  X-ray vision grant? Image 3/3: For starters, we can see that the headphone jack got kicked out to make space for more Taptic Engine.
  • Before we dig into this three-eyed monster, we indulge ourselves with a sneak peek thanks to our friends at Creative Electron.

    • Stay tuned for more views of the new iPhone's internals courtesy of our X-ray X-perts!

  • What advantage does the superpower of X-ray vision grant?

  • For starters, we can see that the headphone jack got kicked out to make space for more Taptic Engine.

  • Closer inspection shows a new, second lower speaker grille that leads... nowhere? Interesting.

  • We can also see the new third eye in the camera array of the iPhone 7 Plus. What wisdom and vision does it hold? Let's find out!

Please x-ray the Lightning to 3.5mm jack adapter so we can see if there's a DAC and AMP built into the cable. Otherwise you're going to have to cut it open, and that won't be pretty.

chris - Reply

I second this!

Dan Parsons -

I wonder if you could use the Lightning to mini jack adapter on one of the older iPhones as a way around having to replace the mini jack when it goes within the phone.

Dan - Reply

The adapter's store page lists it as compatible with every iOS device with a lightning port. Looks like that should work.

Chaz Larson - Reply

The adapter will work with all devices running iOS 10+

You can also use the lightning headphones with any iOS 10+ device as well.

As iOS 10+ only supports the lightning connector they will work with and are backwards compatible with any capable of running it.

paul - Reply

The X-Ray photos that iFixit publicly show are fantastic. I don't think that Apple will be happy with such deep intervention into its hardware. However I am sure that all major phone manufactures are using similar technics of inspection.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

Well it looks like the Mini to Lightning adapter has its own DAC! Here's a teardown: iPhone 7 headphone dongle boasts amazing insides

Dan - Reply

  • Apple may have gotten rid of the headphone jack, but clearly stays loyal to the Pentalobe. Two now-familiar screws guard each side of the Lightning connector.

  • Eager to see past the rose gold exterior, we perform some forceful iSclack-ing and a great deal of prying to get past the intense adhesive.

    • The adhesive strip sealing the 7 Plus is considerably stronger than the strip we found in its predecessor. Could this be our first sign of waterproofing?

Does it make sense noting the best location to set the iSclack onto the iPhone so not to rip the cable connection shown in Step5 below? Or the best pattern to lift the cover off.

Dan - Reply

Apple could easily have avoid screws on iPhone like it does with iPads and iPod touch. This is an indications that Apple wants their phone to be serviceable by experienced foreigners. But not easily ben opened by ordinary users. The adhesive strip is a good idea. I wouldn't like an iPhone with a wobbling battery inside.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

It's not waterproof, it's water-resistant. Similar, but not the same.

Aristarco Palacios - Reply

Can anyone confirm are the pentalobe screws identical (diameter and shaft length) to those of the 6 plus's?

Cooper Chase - Reply

How are the pentalobe screws protected from water? Is there rubber gusket?

Apple - Reply

Image 1/2: We got lucky and didn't rip the display cables along the middle-right side. Thankfully, the top cable has some slack. Image 2/2: Subtle design changes like this are where repair guides come in handy.
  • What is this madness? The 7 Plus bizarrely opens to the side, despite the familiar clips at the top of the phone that help align the display as in previous models.

  • We got lucky and didn't rip the display cables along the middle-right side. Thankfully, the top cable has some slack.

    • Subtle design changes like this are where repair guides come in handy.

  • Opening the 7 Plus reveals lots of black and white gooey adhesives running along the perimeter of the phone.

    • Our bet is that this penguin-themed stickiness is part of Apple's efforts to add water resistance. Then again, Apple's engineers might just really love glue.

Interesting, threes no button, yet it looks like there is? and the metal peice on the side transfers teh taptic? ... Can you go more into this?

Mark - Reply

That's the TouchID sensor.

fastasleep -

Is the White gasket material less or more sticky than the Black? It does look like its thicker than the black (has more viscosity)?

Dan - Reply

You guys act like APPLE hasnt already said that the new iPhone has waterproofing. Which they did and there are plenty of videos showing it works

Jarrett Moering - Reply

I like your writing style! ..."Then again, Apple's engineers might just really love glue." And then a fanboi moron adds comments! Fake Geniuses' would never learn!

orion2000 - Reply

The Glue is silicone ferrite add with adhesive to deflect Cellular transmission effectively

Loli Pop - Reply

The iSclack is more than necessary. This cables can be broken easily. One of the reasons I love iFixit. From my experience all iPhones since iphone 4 were a little waterproofing. I didn't have problems with lightly rain or with wet hands or very sweaty faces. Now with the new iPhone I will use it safely at the beach. However waterproofing is a subjective issue. The iphone 7 is less waterproof than the second Apple watch.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

What Apple Enginners love the most was screw. They take all size of screws, probably they have to get used to different 2 different bosses. Lol...

HSY3 HSY4 - Reply

"Then again, Apple's engineers might just really love glue."

I'm sure that very soon, you will be loving selling us replacement waterproof sticky seals.

alex - Reply

Yeah where can we get "genuine Apple" seals?

gleeglee217 -

As long and convoluted as the prox has become, there should've been a close-up.

mstein - Reply

  • Inside we find an army of courageous tri-point screws guarding the cable bracket that covers the battery connector and two of the display cables.

  • A year ago we went out on a limb and added the Apple watch screw to our 64-bit toolkit. Boy, what a good thing we did.

  • A second platoon of tri-points secure the bracket for the long and springy upper component display cable.

  • Tri-point screws are uncommon. While you could make the argument that tri-point screws are less likely to strip, we assume if it was a choice of mechanical advantage, we'd see them throughout iDevices. It's pretty clear that they are here to simply hinder the two most common user repairs: battery and screen replacements.

  • We dispatch our own weaponry screwdriver and force the bracket to surrender so we can continue our mission into the heart of the iPhone 7 Plus.

There is space for audio jack up there!

victortaykw - Reply

Audio Jack and Water Resistance strike me as being somewhat mutually counterproductive. I, for one, am very happy to see the poxy 3.5mm Jack consigned to history.

biowizard -

Another possibility for the reasoning behind the tri-point screws is that Apple knows these are the most common screws to need to be removed, and chose to go with something less likely to strip for their "geniuses" to work with.

Bryan Schwartz - Reply

The Phillips screw is a terrible screw drive design. According to McFeeley's, it was invented and promoted because the driver will cam out when torque increases. I'm skeptical about the motivation, but Phillips screws cam out or strip out with alarming frequency, especially in smaller sizes. I would love to never see or use a Phillips screw.

If you want to ding Apple for picking obscure drivers, fine. But you should also ding them, and everyone else, when they use the horrible Phillips screws.

Kredanta - Reply

Then why not use Torx?

Chris Prendergast -

The reason tri-lobe screws are used is because a Torx drive socket on a screw that small wouldn't work. The tri-lobe is like a Torx profile and has the same advantages, but with two less lobes. In addition, tri-lobes are used because it can be put on a screw with a thinner head, where other drive types wouldn't work. The thinnest screw heads (0.3mm and below) require tri-lobe.

Do people really think nefarious apple engineers are intentionally trying to keep users from doing repairs? They could care less. Besides, if anyone's gotten that far, a screw type with an uncommon head is not going to stop them.

John Connor -

Bryan is right. They are tri-point because they are the most common to remove and therefore you don't want to strip them. Why all the screws aren't tri-point I'm not sure of.

Shaun Stelley - Reply

But what size of tri lobe is it? Like apple watch y0.6?

picapaukrk - Reply

I never could understand why Apple is bothering with so many different type of screws. At the age of ebay and iFixit every screw can be opened safely. Maybe another method to discourage users that don't know iFixit to mess with the the internal hardware

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

Lets add more screw variant each new release....

taexyz - Reply

The iphone, has wireless ear buds; good thing I dont own one bc they make alot of money on me as I lose litle things like that

Aaron Bouchard - Reply

Image 1/3: No fancy electronics here, just some well-designed acoustics and molded plastic. Image 2/3: '''Teardown Update''': [http://www.theverge.com/2016/9/16/12941040/iphone-7-teardown-plastic-behind-where-headphone-jack-used-to-be|According to Apple,|new_window=true] this plastic component is a barometric vent. With the added ingress protection afforded by the watertight seal, the iPhone uses this baffle to equalize the internal and atmospheric pressures in order to have an accurate altimeter. Image 3/3: Mechanical buttons are a thing of the past when you have a Taptic Engine! This sleek engine uses [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haptic_technology|haptic feedback|new_window=true ] to simulate the push of a button,  without having a real button.
  • In place of the headphone jack, we find a component that seems to channel sound from outside the phone into the microphone... or from the Taptic Engine out.

    • No fancy electronics here, just some well-designed acoustics and molded plastic.

    • Teardown Update: According to Apple, this plastic component is a barometric vent. With the added ingress protection afforded by the watertight seal, the iPhone uses this baffle to equalize the internal and atmospheric pressures in order to have an accurate altimeter.

  • Mechanical buttons are a thing of the past when you have a Taptic Engine! This sleek engine uses haptic feedback to simulate the push of a button, without having a real button.

    • Anyone familiar with the touchpad in the Retina MacBook 2015 has already experienced haptics from the Taptic Engine.

fake speaker port????

Stan Chua - Reply

If it's like ours (Chipworks), there's a microphone on one end of it , so it could be some sort of sound channeling chamber for that.

BHD2 - Reply

Touchpad is also in the latest MacBook Pro laptops

Nathanael Bunge - Reply

Apple doesn't waste space. The left port is for the microphone. It isn't a fake speaker port. And that speaker like component is a sound chamber - like our outer ears.

James Katt - Reply

I agree, likely used to cut down on wind noise (low frequencies) the mic could pick up.

Dan -

Seems apple wasted space here. That "Taptic" engine seems to have a lot of air in it ( in the middle where it's not needed). Wonder if they could have made that a tad less wide and included the audio jack after all???

scottwilkins - Reply

The two things you have to think about is the mass and the throw you have within the Taptic engine when you design it. You need enough mass that can kinetically offset the mass of the device you have it in, as well as the amount of energy to throw of the mass so you feel it.

It appears Apple has used a slightly larger unit (comparing the images). It would nice if someone could weigh the mass and measure the opening size between the iPhone 7 & 7 Plus Taptic engines and the 6 iPhone vibrators

Dan -

Looks a lot like that a "speaker port" for the Taptic Engine, for the home button to not only feel but also sound clicky.

What you described as a sound chamber doesn't seem to actually have any connection to the microphone, but to the Taptic Engine.

dgramatzki - Reply

A Taptic could also be used as a subwoofer, due to its low resonant frequency of about 190Hz

The Speaker Guy - Reply

Are there pins on both sides of the Lightning port.

chris - Reply

I don't understand it.? No other product is taken apart except Apple products. We don't tear apart Samsung, Teslas, GM cars or any other computer type gadgets. Are people that fascinated with only Apple products? Come on stop it. Enjoy the technology. There's plenty of whiz bang products out there try tear them down too. Otherwise, this is iPhone 7, not iPhone 1 give it a break. I want to know more about the hidden features built into the software.

Cg10 - Reply

First day on ifixit? That tore down a lot of other stuff too.

Tom Chai -

iFixit does not NEED to take apart the newer Samsung devices. They are quite capable of doing that themself...

Ruurd Pels -

Tearing down Samsung products is too dangerous. They explode.

alex -

The taptic home button is extension of the 3D touch. Where on the 6S the haptic feedback signaled a single "pop" out menu, the home button feedback happens on keypress and keyup. :)

Peter Shen - Reply

I had a problem with the central button of iPhone 4. Now with the touchpad central button of iPhone 7 the reliability is increased. However the taptic engine is too big. I think that it takes valuable space from the battery. Beside the reliability issue the classic button should be better. I don't like the taptic engine of new MacBooks.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

Why do you say the Taptic Engine is too big? Do you think they made it bigger than it needed to be to function the way they wanted?

pgoodwin1 - Reply

When playing audio, can the Taptic Engine act as a passive bass radiator?

pgoodwin1 - Reply

  • What do you do when things get shaky? You X-ray everything that moves. And that is exactly what we did with the Taptic Engine.

  • "Taptic Engine" sounds like something found on an intergalactic warship. In truth, we really are just working with a tiny linear actuator and some zig-zag springs that shake a weighted core.

    • To be fair, this is the largest piece of mechanical machinery that we've seen in a smartphone.

  • The Taptic Engine translates the pressure on the new solid state home button into finely controlled vibrations.

  • We all love the sensation of clicking a button. The Taptic Engine's precise oscillation is designed to provide many types of tactile feedback, including the sensation of pressing a mechanical button.

    • Why not just use a regular button with a haptic addition like the iPhone 6s? Well, one less button is one less place for water to sneak in.

So is this a voicecoil+magnets actuator? Or a piezo device?

(I'm guessing voicecoil based on the X-Ray.)

atlant - Reply

AH-HA! Moving Parts!

Just Johnny - Reply

The central button could have been integrated on the screen. However it is a different component below screen that now it isn't moving. I hope in the future Apple will produce screens with a virtual central button.

In case of jailbrake the central button shouldn't be operational like it used to be with previous iPhone jailbrake methods.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

So this is the device that replaced the audio jack?

Michael Balzer - Reply

This "button" is cool, but to remove the audio jack is not. Seems Apple needs to find a middle ground. Smaller taptic device and room for the audio jack. Not sure why this wasn't considered on the "Plus" size.

scottwilkins - Reply

What X-Ray equipment do you use? Do you sell this device?

Yan Li - Reply

As a new owner of iPhone 7 plus i think a Linear oscillator is a mixed bag - pluses are quite well known so I'll just point out one big minus - when phone silenced is left on the desk it's almost inaudible. I've already missed some calls and alarms. :( - (it's case that covers camera bump so it lays even flat on desk)

Treku - Reply

Image 1/2: It's time for some battery yoga. We stretch each of the three adhesive pull tabs to release the battery and our tensions about difficult battery removal. Image 2/2: It's time for some battery yoga. We stretch each of the three adhesive pull tabs to release the battery and our tensions about difficult battery removal.
  • We're glad to see Apple sticking with the tradition of including pull tabs for the battery adhesive.

  • It's time for some battery yoga. We stretch each of the three adhesive pull tabs to release the battery and our tensions about difficult battery removal.

Maybe the trickiest part of iPhone repairing. In the case of an early brake of the battery adhesive, tools must be used for removing the battery. Tools that may puncture the battery and cause fire. I suggest a totally discharged iPhone in case of battery replacement.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

And how are we to do that? Let it run down normally? Seems like thatd take a while.

Tom Jackson -

If you rub the haptic feedback sensor in just the right spot it will vibrate continuously and drain the battery quickly

J Goog -

Image 1/2: The battery is rated at 3.82 V and 2900 mAh, for a total of 11.1 Wh, a slight upgrade over the 10.45 Wh (3.8 V, 2750 mAh) of the [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+6s+Plus+Teardown/48171#s107895|6s Plus|new_window=true], and on par with the 11.1 Wh, 2915 mAh cell found in the [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+6+Plus+Teardown/29206#s69024|6 Plus|new_window=true]. Image 2/2: Apple claims battery life will be up to one hour longer than the 6s Plus—that is, 21 hours of 3G talk time, approximately 15 hours of Wi‑Fi internet use, or up to 16 days on standby.
  • And here's the big bad battery itself!

  • The battery is rated at 3.82 V and 2900 mAh, for a total of 11.1 Wh, a slight upgrade over the 10.45 Wh (3.8 V, 2750 mAh) of the 6s Plus, and on par with the 11.1 Wh, 2915 mAh cell found in the 6 Plus.

    • Apple claims battery life will be up to one hour longer than the 6s Plus—that is, 21 hours of 3G talk time, approximately 15 hours of Wi‑Fi internet use, or up to 16 days on standby.

The new efficiency of the iPhone 7 plus allows a smaller battery and lighter weight.

James Katt - Reply

I don't see how "1.11Wh" can be considered a step down from "1.11Wh"! They are identical numbers. The trouble with comparing mAh values, is that they are meaningless without knowing the voltage. And (knowing that W = VA) ...

3.82V * 2.900Ah = 11.078Wh (iPhone 7 plus)

3.80V * 2.915Ah = 11.077Wh (iPhone 6 plus)

Which means they are exactly the same, bar the least significant digit (which is in the 7's favour)!

[comment resubmitted to correct typo!]

biowizard - Reply

I wondder if Apple ever considers using Quick Charge technology from Qualcomm ? My Iphone6 charges at barely over 1A using Apple adapter and cable (slightly lower if using generic cable), whereas QC 3.0 is known to charge at 2A or higher. What gives ?

hn1964 - Reply

Apple as far as I know have a tradition of good batteries except the first generation of iPod nano which wasn't a big issue. I hoped for years that a manufacturer would produced a replacement battery for iPhones with bigger capacity. However Apple has proved that is using the best batteries on the market. And after samsung Galaxy note 7, Apple has the advantage on this factor.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

What voltage can iPhone 7 plus charge at? I see many portable charger claims that they allow voltage boost for iPhone. What exactly it is for me to judge whichever portable charger is best suit for iPhone 7 plus?

Kevin Yip - Reply

Will I be able to use iphone 7 plus or iphone 6 plus battery into my iphone 6splus

shrini23 - Reply

So the iPhone 6 plus had 2915 mah battery and 6s plus had 2750 mah battery and now iPhone 7 plus have 2900 mag battery they be scamming people

dandre832 - Reply

Image 1/3: The two 12 MP cameras—one wide-angle with Optical Image Stabilization (OIS), just like in the iPhone 7, the second a telephoto—allow for optical zoom. Image 2/3: Both cameras also sport a new image sensor that Apple claims is 60% faster and 30% more energy efficient than previous iPhones. Image 3/3: The upgraded cameras almost make it worth the bigger exterior camera bump—now built into the chassis in another suspected waterproofing/dust-fighting tactic.
  • Apple's got us seeing double as we pull out the camera array with two separate sensors, two lenses, and two little connectors.

  • The two 12 MP cameras—one wide-angle with Optical Image Stabilization (OIS), just like in the iPhone 7, the second a telephoto—allow for optical zoom.

  • Both cameras also sport a new image sensor that Apple claims is 60% faster and 30% more energy efficient than previous iPhones.

    • The upgraded cameras almost make it worth the bigger exterior camera bump—now built into the chassis in another suspected waterproofing/dust-fighting tactic.

  • We use our X-ray vision to initiate a staring contest with the camera array. Without blinking, we can see four metal pads around one camera. We're guessing these are the magnets that enable OIS.

Two sets of OIS?

The telephoto lens has OIS?

Not sure about that one

jetlitheone - Reply

Yes it indeed does

yazdanbanaji - Reply

Is there any chance anybody can take calipers to both lens assemblies and find us an actual height?

evilspoonman - Reply

I'm hoping it does but most rumors said no.

maquinn1978 - Reply

It really doesn't seem like it. Look at the voice coils. the smaller 56mm unit only has ones that are lined up to move the lenses back and forth for focusing. the 28mm one has magnets and coils that allow it to move from side to side and up and down for stabilization.

garyliao2001 - Reply

I agree with you. I don't think the telephoto has OIS.

jetlitheone -

Looking at the two camera assemblies it sure looks like the 56mm camera does NOT have OIS. This is consistent what reviewers with units have written so far.

sam123 - Reply

Also, are these sensors 6mm diagonal? (1/3-inch sensors)

evilspoonman - Reply

I think 1/2,6" the first one. EXIF data suggest tele sensor is 1/3,2"...

maurizionatali -

Doesn't look like it has OIS on the 56MM

http://imgur.com/a/6lrPW

max - Reply

I believe those magnets you are indicating on the 28mm optical housing interact with the electromagnets on the face of the sensor assembly. The orange plate with wire traces on all four corners. I agree with your assessment that the 56mm lens is just a focusing voice coil and is not stabilized.

evilspoonman -

"the second a telephoto —allow for optical zoom" Really? Isn't it only for Focus?

Masa - Reply

One camera is a 28mm F1.8 with OIS and sensor, the other is a 56mm F2.8 normal lens with no OIS and it's own sensor, read, not telephoto that optically doubles ( 2x ) the magnification of the two cameras in use. I am not sure how it is dealt with when in between 1-2X but beyond 2x is "digital zoom" which is essentially cropping the native file of the longest lens. There is no real "telephoto" lens in the iPhone 7+, it is just marketing speak. However, the combination of a 28mm and a 56mm lens is not a weak addition to the already great iPhone camera platform. I plan on using it a lot and making a lot of great images with it when not using my professional gear, for my profession.

dphotobayer - Reply

what kind of sensor ? IMX????

badnessboy83 - Reply

I know it's Apple's term, but the non-wideangle camera is not, by any definition, "telephoto". It's actually a "standard" lens, roughly equivalent to a 55mm lens on a 35m camera.

biowizard - Reply

Technically it is a telephoto as are all phone lenses - telephoto means that the lens is shorter than its effective focal length whereas on slrs wide angle lenses have to be reverse telephoto to clear the mirror. It is a telephoto of normal focal length, like the pancake lenses fitted to a number of digital cameras.

Martin Bacon -

A telephoto lens has a focal length longer than that of the track length of the lens assembly. Apple is using the term correctly.

mcm - Reply

where is gyroscope sensor? and accelerometer? thanks

hector - Reply

I'd like to know what the camera module is, and what the pixel size is. In the announcement, they stated "bigger pixels" but never said how big.

skydivertak - Reply

Could you please tell us what the image sensor is? I'm hoping for IMX260 or IMX377, probably the two best smartphone chips on the market today; if the nominal rated size of the main chip is "1/2.6" at 12 MP, the closest match I'm aware of in the Exmor lineup would be the 260 given unless its something brand new, that's the closet match to the specs given (at ~1/2.5 and 12 MP), and Sony only makes a few 1/2.6 chips, none near 12 MP, as well as the 260 being the sensor used in the also dual camera V10. I can't see any obvious candidates for the second sensor; the only 1/3.2 sensors Sony has are the 8 MPs. And I don't see any discussion of the front sensor here, though perhaps I'm just missing it.

CAM Gerlach - Reply

Which is the maker of these sensors?

Techno Golo - Reply

What's the baseline between two camera?

kaiyeh0913 - Reply

Hello guys,

Have you figured out who is the sensor manufacturer?

Miguel Ferreira - Reply

Smartphones even iPhones suffer from image noise during low light shooting. They use very small image sensors which can't gather enough light fast. So the software amplifies digitally the ISO creating image noise and deteriorating colors.

I would prefer a bigger camera with a bigger image sensor with better image stabilization instead of two cameras. Ordinary users are impressed more from the two cameras and don't know the benefits of bigger image sensors.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

I think Sony should be the manufacturer, OIS is not available for the telephoto lens.

gr8sujit - Reply

The comments below this article indicate the telephoto lens does indeed have OIS. But the comments above my post say otherwise. What is the final conclusion? Does the iP7+ have OIS on all lenses/cameras?

speedlever - Reply

Can the camera glass be replaced?

parshnib - Reply

Would there be a way to turn off the hardware OIS by doing into the machine? Some people with stabilizing gimbals are finding the hardware OIS troublesome by causing jitters on video capture. Apple has not enabled a way to completely turn off hardware OIS.

timdlr - Reply

Any chance of being able to replace the camera glass? It's built into the chassis but looks like it could be removed and replaced.

phnxdemon24 - Reply

Image 1/2: With the antenna flex cable removed, we focus our attention on the top left Wi-Fi antenna. Image 2/2: With the antenna flex cable removed, we focus our attention on the top left Wi-Fi antenna.
  • Before we can dig the logic board out of the rear case, we have to remove portions of the antenna assembly—including the antenna flex cable, which acts as a bridge between antenna pathways.

  • With the antenna flex cable removed, we focus our attention on the top left Wi-Fi antenna.

These both appear to be Squelch pads. The second image is the shielding cover over the second. The antenna is the upper case its self.

Unlike the iPhone 6 series which had two antenna's in the top case this series shares the same antenna for both cellular and WiFi. Its possible they also have so attenuator logic here as well.

Dan - Reply

What's with all the tooling marks in the pink? I thought the back is supposed to be as beautiful as the front?

Charles Reese - Reply

I hope the the new iPhone 7 with smaller visible antennas will have the same sensitivity as previous models.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

Image 1/2: It may seem like a small victory, but we're still encouraged—even small design changes can make a difference in terms of repairability. Image 2/2: Peeling up the EMI stickers, we spy what might be some additional heat management.
  • Plucking the logic board from the 7 Plus is much easier than with its predecessor. There's no need to flip over the logic board to remove the final connections.

    • It may seem like a small victory, but we're still encouraged—even small design changes can make a difference in terms of repairability.

  • Peeling up the EMI stickers, we spy what might be some additional heat management.

    • Could that be the A10 under there?

That EMI stickers are destroyed when are peeled off? Can they be reused with the same efficiency? Can they be replaced by better quality and more safe ones?

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

Image 1/1: Apple A10 Fusion APL1W24 SoC + Samsung 3 GB LPDDR4 RAM (as denoted by the markings K3RG4G40MM-YGCH)
  • The shields are down! The logic board is clear and ready for inspection. Let's see what this puppy is packing!

    • Apple A10 Fusion APL1W24 SoC + Samsung 3 GB LPDDR4 RAM (as denoted by the markings K3RG4G40MM-YGCH)

    • Qualcomm MDM9645M LTE Cat. 12 Modem

    • Skyworks 78100-20

    • Avago AFEM-8065 Power Amplifier Module

    • Avago AFEM-8055 Power Amplifier Module

    • Universal Scientific Industrial O1 X4

    • Bosch Sensortec BMP280 Barometric Pressure Sensor

Anyway to tell if there are enough antennas support 4x4 MIMO?

Nick Roosevelt - Reply

The blue chip is bigger than the small one, so it can't be same.

The blue one is an Avago AFEM-8055 Power Amplifier Module.

Cheers,

Sebastian Beyer - Reply

Blue one should be 8055 from the picture?

torlies - Reply

What's the part at the right location of the blue avago chip?

torlies - Reply

The Qualcomm Snapdragon X12 LTE modem indeed does support 4x4 MIMO, 256-QAM downlink, 64-QAM uplink

Source: https://www.qualcomm.com/products/snapdr...

tuanchoang - Reply

It supports 4X4 MIMO, but the physical antennas have to be installed by the manufacturer, in this case, Apple would have to be sure to include the antenna set. It is supposedly supported via software update, so it seems that might also depend on Apple.

Nick Roosevelt - Reply

The chip below the green one looks like a Murata one. It has its marker "M" with a circle.

Jie Zou - Reply

So Apple is advertising a 450 Mbps maximum downlink throughput (cat 9 or 10) but Qualcomm chipset (at least, no idea for intel LTE baseband used) is capable of Cat 12 , i.e up to 600 Mbps throughputs ? Maybe Apple is advertising 450 Mbps because only Qualcomm chipset support it ? Maybe it is firmware locked to ue cat 9 or 10 ?

Basile Carle - Reply

Looks like there is another chip hidden. Left side of A10chip, in between capacitors - try to xray or remove the material

humanresourceac - Reply

3 GBytes Ram on iPhone when the 4Gbyte Ram of new macbook are considered enough by Apple. This phone is a real beast. The one Gbyte of iPhone 6 plus isn't enough for multitasking with the new updates of apps. A really huge step forward. The gap between iPads and iPhone is closing.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

The Avago chips are really Broadcom chips. Avago announced its intention to acquire Broadcom in May 2015. The acquisition was completed in February 2016. Avago decided to exist under the Broadcom name, as it was more well known than the relatively new Avago (which formerly was part of Agilent, which itself was a spin-off from Hewlett-Packard).

bobmcd50 - Reply

It is not "MDM9645M". It is MDM9645.

JJ Wu - Reply

52RD.com is showing the Invensense 773C chip on the same board. http://img.mp.itc.cn/upload/20160919/734...

Geeky1 - Reply

Here is also a link to the translated article. http://www.microsofttranslator.com/bv.as...

Geeky1 - Reply

Very surprised that Ifixit would miss such an identifiable chip. Especially after having so much time to correct it. Could something foul be afoot with the politics in which they "teardown"?

dseigel - Reply

Can't say for certain. I just find it bizarre that no US teardown has identified this chip but several others internationally have.

Geeky1 -

what is inside "Universal Scientific Industrial O1 X4"? There are two similar parts on the main board.

JJ Wu - Reply

很有用的拆解!对于初学者有很大的帮助,谢谢!

Ivan Xie - Reply

which IC is operating home button?

Adiee - Reply

Image 1/1: Toshiba THGBX6T0T8LLFXF 128 GB NAND Flash
  • Round the back now: another field of ICs!

    • Toshiba THGBX6T0T8LLFXF 128 GB NAND Flash

    • Murata 339S00199 Wi-Fi/Bluetooth Module

    • NXP 67V04 NFC Controller

    • Dialog 338S00225 Power Management IC

    • Qualcomm PMD9645 Power Management IC

    • Qualcomm WTR4905 Multimode LTE Transceiver

    • Qualcomm WTR3925 RF Transceiver

Which SKU of iphone7+ are you tearing down? Does it support CDMA?

sameer vora - Reply

The wifi module is done by Murata again. And it seems to provide another chip above the blue one?

BTW where is the motion sensor, i.e., the accelometer and gyro?

Jie Zou - Reply

Sameer Vora - There is only one. The iPhone has been CDMA+GSM since the "World Phone" of the iPhone 4S

Steven Gergus - Reply

Not true - The 7 now has 4 part numbers: 2 for the CDMA (7 & 7+) and 2 for the GSM (7 & 7+) . IIRC - the GSM only models have Intel Modems - but no CDMA support.

Nikon1 - Reply

TLC again! Is it a 3D NAND?

Yifan - Reply

How is the Bluetooth antenna compared to the one on the 6S Plus? Bluetooth performance is particularly important for me since I've invested in wireless earbuds with a weak RX. 6S Plus works fine but there's always room for improvement.

nametemp - Reply

Has anyone noticed the lack of an envelope tracker on the Qualcomm version of the iPhone 7??

Anshel Sag - Reply

Of course there isn't place for an FM analog radio receiver. I will die and iPhones will still snob the traditional free analog radio. Mobile carriers love people paying for listening radio during commuting. Apple doesn't even produce an adapter for radio. One of the few topics that android phones are betters.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

The model is A1785 according to the first post. This means this is the Japan model. If what I hear is correct, this means that the chips in this model are different than those around the world. This has to do with the FeliCa chip that Apple said would be available in "iPhones sold in Japan." What I would like to know is what a teardown of a non-Japanese iphone 7 has in terms of NFC chips. I wonder because there would be a difference of "We only advertise FeliCa in Japan (but the hardware is there)" as opposed to "We only include the hardware for FeliCa in the Japanese SKUs, A1779 (iphone 7) or A1785 (iPhone 7 Plus)." As someone who travels to Japan (and has Suica/FeliCa cards), this would be useful to know.

Charles Rosenberg - Reply

Image 1/1: Apple/Cirrus Logic 338S00105 Audio Codec
  • But wait, there are even more ICs on the back!

    • Apple/Cirrus Logic 338S00105 Audio Codec

    • Cirrus Logic 338S00220 Audio Amplifier(x2)

    • Lattice Semiconductor ICE5LP4K

    • Skyworks 13702-20 Diversity Receive Module

    • Skyworks 13703-21 Diversity Receive Module

    • Avago LFI630 183439

    • NXP 610A38

it should be lattice iCE5LP4K . what is the purpose for this ? any advantage with it ?

william0312 - Reply

Thanks for the Audio Codec and Amplifier info!!

Barry Wilson - Reply

As usual Apple exept the panel of iPhone, purchases everything from third suppliers.

Agnostos Gnostos - Reply

Image 1/2: TDK EPCOS D5315 Image 2/2: Texas Instruments 64W0Y5P
  • Just a few last ICs on the back of the logic board:

    • TDK EPCOS D5315

    • Texas Instruments 64W0Y5P

    • Texas Instruments 65730A0P Power Management IC

  • And as always, thanks to our silicon experts at Chipworks for helping identify the key ICs at play! Head over to their teardown page for an in-depth analysis of the iPhone 7 control hardware.

Is there any dimension numbers?

Hmil2017 - Reply

Image 1/3: Sharing design similarities with the speakers in the [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+6+Plus+Teardown/29206#s69118|6 Plus|new_window=true] and [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+6s+Plus+Teardown/48171#s107901|6S Plus|new_window=true], the speaker in the 7 Plus also bears a familiar antenna appendage. Image 2/3: Sharing design similarities with the speakers in the [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+6+Plus+Teardown/29206#s69118|6 Plus|new_window=true] and [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+6s+Plus+Teardown/48171#s107901|6S Plus|new_window=true], the speaker in the 7 Plus also bears a familiar antenna appendage. Image 3/3: Sharing design similarities with the speakers in the [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+6+Plus+Teardown/29206#s69118|6 Plus|new_window=true] and [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+6s+Plus+Teardown/48171#s107901|6S Plus|new_window=true], the speaker in the 7 Plus also bears a familiar antenna appendage.
  • Raising the roof loudspeaker out of the phone, we find some nice spring contacts and some mesh with ingress-protection!

  • Sharing design similarities with the speakers in the 6 Plus and 6S Plus, the speaker in the 7 Plus also bears a familiar antenna appendage.

If the lightning port is not smooth with the body the phone will fail when submerged in water?

Bubs - Reply

IPHONE 7 GIVEAWAY...GO TO THIS LINK TO QUALIFY FOR THE GIVEAWAY RIGHT NOW http://78702.claimiphone7.net/

martokay95 - Reply

Image 1/3: As predicted, the speaker grilles have ingress protection to keep the internals nice and dry. Image 2/3: And in case you haven't noticed, this Lightning connector assembly is huge! Like previous generations, it is moderately adhered and readily removed from the rear case. Image 3/3: This cable assembly also features the most substantial gasketing we've seen on a Lightning connector. While [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+6s+Plus+Teardown/48171#s107903|last year's models used foam adhesive|new_window=true] to keep out water and dust, this one features a full-on rubber gasket, capable of holding back a 50 meter column of water.
  • Tiny ribbon cables attach the Lightning connector assembly to the microphones, which are firmly adhered to the speaker grilles.

  • As predicted, the speaker grilles have ingress protection to keep the internals nice and dry.

    • And in case you haven't noticed, this Lightning connector assembly is huge! Like previous generations, it is moderately adhered and readily removed from the rear case.

  • This cable assembly also features the most substantial gasketing we've seen on a Lightning connector. While last year's models used foam adhesive to keep out water and dust, this one features a full-on rubber gasket, capable of holding back a 50 meter column of water.

I think the 50m water resistance is apple watch 2's feature, not iphone 7's.

ruoungon - Reply

QUOTE: "capable of holding back a 50 meter column of water"

Really?! I thought the iPhone 7 models were IP67 - meaning they should withstand ingress from 1m of water for 30 minutes

biowizard - Reply

I think I found the baro sensor, it's underneath the lower left mic, sharing the same port.

Tom Chai - Reply

The gasket itself perhaps can hold back a 50m column of water.

Rick Bargerhuff - Reply

Me thinks steps 18 & 19 got swapped

coodie - Reply

Whoops! Fixed, thanks!

Andrew Optimus Goldberg -

Image 1/3: Figures 1 and 2: a plastic SIM eject plug with a rubber gasket. Image 2/3: Figure 3: a rubber gasket on the SIM tray. Image 3/3: Rubber gaskets and plugs aren't new technology, but they are effective at keeping liquids and dust out of your phone. But there's a cost—when you replace a component you'll need to make sure you get the gasket in place and that it creates a good seal, which tends to be an extra, finicky step.
  • Water resistance has been touted as a big new feature in the iPhone 7 Plus—but what actually makes it water resistant? The evidence is everywhere:

    • Figures 1 and 2: a plastic SIM eject plug with a rubber gasket.

    • Figure 3: a rubber gasket on the SIM tray.

  • Rubber gaskets and plugs aren't new technology, but they are effective at keeping liquids and dust out of your phone. But there's a cost—when you replace a component you'll need to make sure you get the gasket in place and that it creates a good seal, which tends to be an extra, finicky step.

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Image 1/1: From the front face, it looks identical to the 1920-by-1080 displays we've popped off the iPhones 6 and 6s, but there are some notable changes: This guy supports a wider P3 color gamut than its older siblings, and is 25% brighter.
  • Pausing our rear case excavation, we take a moment to examine the display assembly and its respective bits.

  • From the front face, it looks identical to the 1920-by-1080 displays we've popped off the iPhones 6 and 6s, but there are some notable changes: This guy supports a wider P3 color gamut than its older siblings, and is 25% brighter.

  • We also notice a water damage indicator hanging out on the left edge of the display EMI shield. This gadget may be water resistant, but it looks like Apple won't be on the hook when you take your phone for a swim.

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Image 1/3: This new earpiece speaker does double duty—for the first time, it also serves as a loudspeaker, giving the iPhone stereo sound for those times when you need to rock out and you ''might'' not have any place to plug in your headphones. Image 2/3: The front-facing camera cable assembly is a little more of a handful. Normally when we're served something this tangled up, it comes with meatballs. Image 3/3: All told, the upper components number:
  • After we free a few standard Phillips screws, the earpiece speaker practically falls out from under the front-facing camera.

    • This new earpiece speaker does double duty—for the first time, it also serves as a loudspeaker, giving the iPhone stereo sound for those times when you need to rock out and you might not have any place to plug in your headphones.

  • The front-facing camera cable assembly is a little more of a handful. Normally when we're served something this tangled up, it comes with meatballs.

  • All told, the upper components number:

    • Front-facing camera

    • Microphone

    • Stereo-enabling speaker

    • Proximity sensor and ambient light sensor

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Image 1/3: But luckily, there's no adhesive on the LCD shield plate—and the cables are nicely managed. Image 2/3: There's not much to see here, so we quickly remove the shield plate and head for home, i.e. the home button. Image 3/3: There's not much to see here, so we quickly remove the shield plate and head for home, i.e. the home button.
  • More tri-point screws secure the home button and LCD shield plate.

  • But luckily, there's no adhesive on the LCD shield plate—and the cables are nicely managed.

  • There's not much to see here, so we quickly remove the shield plate and head for home, i.e. the home button.

Has the possibility to swap the flat button extender home like the iphone 6s

atlantisgfx - Reply

Image 1/3: It's more like the home ''touch sensor'' really. No buttons about it. Image 2/3: Analog Devices [https://chipworks1.force.com/DefaultStore/ccrz__ProductDetails?viewState=DetailView&cartID=&sku=ANA-AD7149-1ACBZ&&store=DefaultStore|AD7149|new_window=true] Capacitance Sensor Controller Image 3/3: For those of you waiting with bated breath, it appears that the new solid state home button is removable. It won't be a simple procedure, with tiny tri-points and light adhesive on the cable—but there is no longer a delicate gasket to replace. Overall, it is a step in the right direction.
  • Last to leave the display assembly: the home button.

    • It's more like the home touch sensor really. No buttons about it.

    • Analog Devices AD7149 Capacitance Sensor Controller

  • For those of you waiting with bated breath, it appears that the new solid state home button is removable. It won't be a simple procedure, with tiny tri-points and light adhesive on the cable—but there is no longer a delicate gasket to replace. Overall, it is a step in the right direction.

  • A replaceable home button is great news for consumers. The mechanical home button has been a point of failure on past iPhones. While our data shows that the reliability of the home button is better in the 6 and 6s compared to the 5 and 5s, we’ve still had close to 100,000 people use our iPhone 6 home button repair procedure.

  • Additionally, the move to a non-mechanical button should improve overall reliability and reduce the need for replacement. Not to mention, it looks great under an X-ray.

How is the home button waterproofed? It looks like it just sits on top of the glass but that can't be right...

Steven Gergus - Reply

The home button acts like a plug, with wedged sides pressing on the screen from above. The screw actually pulls the button in to seal tightly.

Tom Chai -

If it doesn't 'move' for normal operation, why is the home button removable? I'm anxious to feel these in action.

lwwells - Reply

The home button still implements the touch ID circuitry so it needs to be removable in order to replace.

Rick Bargerhuff -

If I recall, not everyone can replace the home button on the previous iPhone because there was a chip on the cable that has some data that's tied to the specific motherboard (apple citing that it was a security feature). Only a reprogram at Apple can "pair" a new home button to a phone. I wonder if this is like that? But without any moving parts, it's a lot more reliable of course.

Ryo Saeba - Reply

Image 1/2: However, the volume and power buttons are nestled snugly in the case, defying conventional removal. Image 2/2: The design looks somewhat reminiscent of past [http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2015/04/apple-invents-water-tight-idevice-buttons.html|Apple patent filings for waterproof buttons|new_window=true], and requires some [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+7+Teardown/67382#s136541|deft disassembly technique].

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Image 1/2: But not for long—we have another cutting edge gadget from Cupertino coming your way soon. Stay tuned for more! Image 2/2: Special thanks to our friends at Nikkei for lending us their office space in Tokyo to do what we do best!
  • The grand finale! With the iPhone 7 Plus torn to bits, we line up our prizes for inspection.

    • But not for long—we have another cutting edge gadget from Cupertino coming your way soon. Stay tuned for more!

  • Special thanks to our friends at Nikkei for lending us their office space in Tokyo to do what we do best!

Did/could you guys put the phone back together into working order. Did ya fix it?!

fullard108 - Reply

Final Thoughts
  • The battery is straightforward to access. Removing it requires specialty screwdrivers and knowledge of the adhesive removal technique, but is not difficult.
  • The solid state home button eliminates a common point of failure.
  • Improved water and dust protection greatly reduces the need for repairs associated with environmental damage and accidental spills (but also makes some repairs more difficult).
  • The display assembly continues to be the first component out, simplifying screen repairs, but the procedure has grown more complicated with improved waterproofing measures.
  • With the addition of tri-point screws, many iPhone 7 Plus repairs will require up to four different types of drivers.
Repairability Score
7
Repairability 7 out of 10
(10 is easiest to repair)

144 Comments

%#*@ i was so eagerly waiting for this ! I'm like ifixit hasn't uploaded the first set of teardown and here we go

yazdanbanaji - Reply

Me too! Love their work.

Colin Baines -

Has anyone tried to remove the home "button" yet? Worried about being able to transfer touch id to replacement screens......

rneeley - Reply

I think the home button is still transferrable to replacement screen based on the screws right under its plate, it should have a small connector to the LCD assembly itself.

iTechshark MO -

That it what I am hoping based on the video that came out Wednesday, but then they did not remove it. I own a repair shop, I am sitting on the edge of my seat here ;)

rneeley -

Same thing here lol

iTechshark MO -

Somebody in China beat ifixit to it and did a full teardown. The home button is transferable.

Tom Chai -

Tom - Do you have a link?

rneeley -

There appears to be a video posted on YouTube of a teardown that took place on the 13th. The video description says it happened in Vietnam. It was obviously obtained illegally due to the obfuscation of the serial and IMEI info on the back of the phone. I wont post the link here but you can search "iPhone 7 Plus Teardown/Disassembly".

SGB74 -

Re Home "button" replacement. I was under the impression a new "button" still needs to be calibrated to recognize all previous finger prints. I am not completely positive this is still the case. (?)

jchagman -

Are you going to teardown model A1784 to see if it does indeed have an Intel modem?

andrewdavidharvey - Reply

It's all about the modem here. Big thing is for me: if Qualcamm, what model, X12? How many antennas, 4x4?

Nick Roosevelt -

Yes, its Qualcomm LTE Cat 12 modem which is capable of 650Mbps downlink speed. But stupid Apple folks have restricted it to 450 Mbps to match with inferior Intel modem on some models. Intel is Cat 10 modem capable of max 450Mbps

shreyassv123 -

I'd be interested to know if iPhone 7 not sold in Japan contains "FeliCa Type-F NFC contactless technology,"

http://www.apple.com/newsroom/2016/09/ap...

msulistio - Reply

I second this! Look forward to maybe hearing from you guys.

Sam Lewis -

The same NXP 67V04 chip is installed also in the AT&T model.

http://www.chipworks.com/about-chipworks...

koyama -

what is the difference of this iPhone compared to the one they sell in USA?

george allo -

It appears the Home button is screwed in. The LCD shield looks like it will be fun to remove since the display cable is now in the middle left of it instead of at the top.

Kevin Stuckey - Reply

I am zooming in trying to find a cable, so far I can't find one coming off the button. I know the folks at iFixit have to take their time and do a complete teardown (and upload and type out info), I just wish they would skip ahead a little ;) - We all know the logic board will come out ;)

rneeley -

Thats pretty much same layout of LCD/Digitizer in iPad Air located on the lower right side with the addition of another flex for front facing cam on iPhone 7 series.

iTechshark MO -

The cable might be routed under the LCD back plate and thats what I am hoping, Apple will be insane having the home button built in the LCD assembly, maybe next year but not that year lol

iTechshark MO -

Ya, It does have a resemblance to the iPad Mini 4 too (oddly enough did two of those this week, of four total I have seen). We should all know very soon hopefully. We all know the fruit company would like to kill all the small repairs shops off and force people to their stores, but then again I am in a fairly large city with no store for 2.5 hours in any direction...

rneeley -

Will this iPhone have USB 3.0, like the iPad Pro?! Haha.

hyperintel13 - Reply

no, Lightning port on iPhone 7 does not have pins on both sides like iPad Pro 12.9" https://twitter.com/ingulsrud/status/776...

joel -

The flex cable appears to go off on the right of the Home button and there seems to be an extension cable that connects to it near the rightmost screw. You can see a small bubble in the cable between the LCD shield and Home button shield??.

Kevin Stuckey - Reply

You are right, thats what I was saying a minute ago.

iTechshark MO -

Also I am kinda feeling that the home button/touch ID will be easier to transfer than previous model with no adhesive, it seems its just a plate screwed in the button.

iTechshark MO -

Also if you look at the photo closely, there is a flex on the right side of the home button ( its on the left side on the 6 /6S series ) so I am kinda positive that the home button/touch ID is transferrable based on a close up of the photo with a zoom in the right side of the home button.

iTechshark MO - Reply

I agree with you!

Kevin Stuckey -

OK, I see what your talking about. Their is also a little hump on the right that is probably the connection point. Looking at the screw in the center of the button, maybe it comes out the front like the track-pad on a macbook. That shield should be lots of fun, I am betting the LCD flex is glued over.

rneeley -

Yup that sounds right except that the screw is just sitting to hold the button on place and not to adjust its tactile feedback since its not mechanical.

iTechshark MO -

"Two separate sensors, two lenses, and two sets of optical image stabilizers." So OIS on both lenses/sensors?

holger - Reply

Yes indeed ! You got the right mate ! Despite people's claims on the telephoto lens not having the OiS it's crystal clear from this teardown that it indeed does have one

yazdanbanaji -

Based on Apple , its just one mechanical OIS and the second one is just software controlled so its just one OIS as far as I can tell.

iTechshark MO -

No I don't think so, the electromagnetic coils of the 56mm unit only move the lens back and forth for focusing. The 28mm unit you can clearly see the coils and the magnets that allow it to move side to side.

garyliao2001 -

You are right, didn't notice the coils at all.

iTechshark MO -

I can confirm that the touch ID/home button is screwed in a plate with 3 screws to pull it off and the button itself is screwed to the middle of the shield with one , cheers guys, its gonna be transferrable :)

iTechshark MO - Reply

Good! Now I can sleep soundly tonight knowing I still have a job for the next year :)

Kevin Stuckey -

We all have businesses for another year then Ed :) -- Can not wait to see the pictures, and especially do my own teardown (I am on the east cost of the US, so I have 8-9 hours to wait on Fedex still.)

rneeley -

Haha you are %#*@ right, one more year in repair business lol

iTechshark MO -

Not like many of us get much Samsung business anymore... Most of my customers faint or hang up when I tell them how much to fix an S7 Edge screen... Looking into the freezing technique, but not eager to spend a could grand on a maybe....

rneeley -

Awesome job ifixit. $&@".?

Alber Einsten - Reply

You are always so professional

Dorothy - Reply

Great work!! Can't wait to see the speaker on the top !

Barry Wilson - Reply

Please do provide a detailed review of the new NFC chip that features FeliCa technology exclusively for the Japanese model A1784.

Thanks!

AKari Kamigishi - Reply

Please also tear down the 3.5mm to lightning cable to determine what type of DAC it uses

Pasko - Reply

Yes, please do this someone!

Dan Parsons -

And the earphones ~~ DD

Henryplusone -

Are we sure this uses a DAC and the lightning port isn't just capable of outputting an analog signal?

lwwells -

Indeed I am also dying to know what the DAC situation is!

Foo Bar -

I've had one of these adapters since Thursday -- if I had know it was going to take this long, I would have just torn mine down and published the results on my own blog! The reveal of the third amp is a serious indicator Apple has modified its MFi specs, and now allows analogue output from Lightning. That's a HUGE deal.

Mac 128 -

Yes also very keen to find this info out. Chop-chop ifixit (literally)!

shrike8 -

I'd like to see the SIM tray portion that this mechanism is how to achieve water resistance IPx7.

ao11oaray - Reply

Nice teardown!

How about gyro?

STM or Invensense?

john smith - Reply

I am guessing the rectangular chip besides those front-end modules in step 14 is the gyro/accelometer. It becomes such a weird shape because Apple wants both a low-energy 3-axis and an accurate 6-axis in one module. If my theory is right, the marker on that chip hints STM.

Jie Zou -

It is the latest INVN chip

Someone who knows -

Hey someone who knows why are you so sure? In the 6 there were two separate gyros, a Bosch 3-axis and an Invensense 6-axis: http://www.chipworks.com/about-chipworks... Is this a new part (combo 3 and 6-axis)?

John -

It is 6-axis Invensense and yes, I am very sure for reasons not related to this article.

Someone who knows -

7 and 7 plus accelerometer response is different ,so wonder if 7 still use Bosch acce like iphone 6.

john smith -

It appears to be an invensense chip. You can see it on the Chinese version... http://www.microsofttranslator.com/bv.as...

Geeky1 -

Since the other link is now dead here is another! https://translate.google.com/translate?h...

Geeky1 -

So what is reparability score ?

Fahad Muneeb - Reply

Would like to see what's going on inside the 3.5mm adapter.

Paul Weston - Reply

+1! And there are chips in earphones, too. Crack it!~ DD

Henryplusone -

What is the model number of this phone ?

Sathish S - Reply

model number: A1785.

skemhey -

Apple A10 Fusion APL1W24 SoC - made by TSMC or Samsung?

Lets teardown A1784..

skemhey - Reply

100% made in TSMC. That is old news.

Jie Zou -

Wow, amazing. The battery is the same of 6 Plus.

Marco Tini - Reply

I wonder, if I teardown and reassemble again will it be water resistant after re-assembly? as I can see there were some glue while opening the phone.

dhanesh shastri - Reply

Who supplied the gyroscope and accelometer? Traditionally it is near those front-end modules.

Jie Zou - Reply

Any changes to the proximity sensor and front camera?

tohff7 - Reply

%#*@! this is beautiful!

Satyajeet Vishwakarma - Reply

You complimented them.

ayushiagrawal42 -

Are you sure home bouton is transferable : supplier in china send me some photo and it s appear the home home flex is laser soldered on the metal frame

sylvainA FR - Reply

Lets teardown A1784..

skemhey - Reply

How does Apple get stereo from only one speaker? Or does the photo of the speaker in step 19 show a divider in the middle that "separates" two small speakers? If so, how does one call this "stereo" when the two speakers are so close together? And why do the diagrams on Apple's website show lines pointing to the two grilles on the bottom of the phone, with the legend describing them as "Stereo speakers", when the iFixit teardown shows that the left-hand grille doesn't actually have a speaker behind it, contrary to Apple's diagram? And why do some of Apple's own diagrams point to a supposed second speaker towards the top of the phone, though the iFixit teardown found no such speaker there?

johnsawyercjs - Reply

The receiver speaker - that is, the speaker you hold up to your ear when you make a phone call, is the "second speaker" they're using for stereo sound now.

Dan Parsons -

Thanks. It took me a while to figure that out.

So it seems that the second speaker is a beefier version of the ear speaker at the top of the phone, shown above the display in step 5. If so, since this speaker is front-facing, and the speaker at the bottom is downward/side-facing, this might not give a normal stereo image, but it has the advantage of delivering sound along two planes instead of one, so that whether you're facing the front of the phone or its lower end, you'll still have one speaker pointed towards you, which should deliver better clarity than having neither speaker pointed towards you. Of course, if you have the phone sitting on a table and you're facing one of the two sides or the top end of the phone, you won't have a speaker pointed towards you, but you'll still have the front-facing speaker emitting sound up and out, and sound reflecting upward off the table from the bottom-facing speaker, so there will still be good diffusion of sound, and some stereo separation.

johnsawyercjs -

Looks like iPhone 7 Plus has Qualcomm Modem on both CDMA and non CDMA versions !!

shreyassv123 - Reply

But where is the screen teardown??

edenadinar - Reply

It seems more modular than 6s and earlier. Are there more easily replaceable parts?

John Gough - Reply

Unanswered question, what model, if any, uses Intel Modem.

Is there really a specific NFC-F ( Felica ) hardware or is it all software?

K Sec - Reply

Any thoughts about "BENDGATE" - as this phone is lighter than last year's model, will it be bendy, like the original 6-plus? Or pretty rigid, like the 6S-plus? What type of aluminium have they used this year?

biowizard - Reply

It's extremely rigid.

max damage -

Anybody know who makes the 'Proximity sensor and ambient light sensor' shown in step 21?

PrettyFlyWiFi - Reply

What about the 3.5mm adapter? Does it contain a dac?

George Papamichail - Reply

can you measure the different dimensions of the two camera sensors?

simonesala - Reply

This Looks like much easier display-replacement - right?

Naderio LP - Reply

Tear down the adapter please! Dac and amp info needed!

johnarett - Reply

Repairability: Madness

Ivan - Reply

So Felica is available for all iPhone models. I wonder if tourists can use Felica in Japan?

Staubchen - Reply

iFixit! Where can we get hi-res images of these?

mooo - Reply

IPhone 7

Audio ICs

The iPhone 7 still uses the same Apple/Cirrus Logic 338S00105 Audio Codec as in the iPhone 6S, but the Audio Amplifier has changed to the new 338S00220. (previously 338S1285).

We found not just 2 but 3 Audio Amplifiers - we speculate there is one audio amplifier for for each of the two speakers, and the third amplifier is for the headphone via the Lightning port.

The third Audio amplifier is situated next to the Applications Processor Module with 3 black blobs on it. It was discovered during de-soldering of the A10 applications processor. When the blob was scraped off, it was an ‘oh wow, there are 3 audio amps!’ kind of discovery. Chipworks has a Basic Functional Analysis Report of the Apple/Cirrus Logic 338S1285.

Note******** ifixit teardown report only lists 2 audio amps ....Chipworks discovered the third amp

https://www.chipworks.com/about-chipwork...

marty - Reply

Could you measure the dimensions of the A10 Fusion chip? That would be very useful calculation die size! Also, high-res photo's of the A10 would be much appreciated :)

Ewout - Reply

anyone knows something about light and proximity sensors?

Gianluca Bertuzzo - Reply

which ram is right for 7plus ?2gb?3gb?

wei wang - Reply

Wow you guys are like display mate for tearing down phones.

rafaelbreban - Reply

"Hopefully Apple didn't remove anything important." haha

Dylan - Reply

Will you guys tear down the 3.5mm adapter?

rafaelgil2006 - Reply

Does anybody know if the 7 plus is using saphire glass? Or is it (like it was shown in a video earlier on the regular 7) only using Gorilla Glass.

han - Reply

You missed a third audio amplifier. Directly above the "A" in "A10" on the processor, there is a chip with 3 black blobs on it. It's the amplifier for the lightning port to headphone adapter.

spaceywilly - Reply

Yes, that third amp is a significant discovery implying a major change to Apple's MFi specs. In which case its a huge reversal of position, and will lead to a flood of cheap analogue audio products previously not possible, not to mention significant confusion as to just exactly what a "Lightning" equipped product means. My adapter didn't work on my SE until I updated to iOS 10. That shouldn't have been necessary as Apple already has published Lightning audio specs -- unless they changed something significant. So suddenly its not an inexpensive digital adapter with a DAC and amp, its a very expensive port connector changer.

Mac 128 -

Great job! Very interesting and informative! Like your lite hearted easy to read writing!

orion2000 - Reply

Nice teardown.... Looks like we have most of the tools available @RadioShack. Ah tri-wings... just like the McDonalds toys.

Radio Shack SLO - Reply

Can somebody help crack my iPhone 6S encryption?? I forgot my passcode and only 2 more attempts before lock out.

hdtv720p - Reply

what is the difference on the 1784 model?

I see everyone asking for a teardown. Is it better than the rest of them?

george allo - Reply

Any idea what the part is between the RF front-end (between the Skyworks part and Avago PAMs)?

Harold - Reply

The stereo speakers function in such a way, that if you do watch a video on your phone or if you tilt your phone sideways, there will be a left and right speaker, both working to create a stereo sound. Most people do use their iPhone sideways to view videos, so this will certainly be noticeable to them.

Jose Toscano - Reply

I'd love to see a review of this. I can't imagine how they are going to make two different speakers sound the same, much less where one faces the listener, and the other points of to the side.

Mac 128 -

What about reassembly? It looks like a lot of the waterproofing is either a) lost, or b) significantly disturbed from the teardown. With reassembly, do we have to completely remove the waterproofing and reapply? If not, does it go back together imperfectly, due to gobs of the waterproofing building up during disassembly?

I wonder if you couldn't spray the entire internals with waterproofing, after the fact? It would make future mods/repairs basically impossible, but would improve/restore the initial waterproofing.

To all the rocket surgeons and techies out there, what're your thoughts?

bsquirdoff - Reply

Can anyone explain why Apple keeps changing their screw heads? I'm genuinely curious to know how this is better than torx or pentalobe.

Ivy Wlrs - Reply

The homebutton is almost the same venkat from harithatech.com

venkatramt - Reply

I was wondering if phones get taken apart for repairability grading, do any of these phones get put back together? :)

Peter Shen - Reply

How about the flash lights? They claimed to be 4 LEDs.

WPG - Reply

why 4 different types of drivers? star for the bottom two screws, tri point for the new type and the obvious normal screw?

Krayzee - Reply

Hello there ,

I have a question , what size are the tri-points screws (Y000, 1 or 2)??

because i have the classic Pro tech toolkit and i just want to make sure if i have the right tools or not!

Thank you guys

Ibrahim - Reply

Did you specify the IMU package?

Is this the new IPS LCD panel from JDI? I have read it uses the second generation Low Temperature Polysilicon backplanes, which in another article fueled a rumor that a higher resolution panel was going to used due to the power savings.

Is the lightening port data throughput the same as the previous iPhone 6s Plus, or the updated standard used in the iPad Pro?

Have you confirmed that there is analog audio available now from the lightning port?

Michael Balzer - Reply

How about the flash lights? They claimed to be 4 LEDs. http://txlcd.com

txlcdsupplier - Reply

I have a question. Did Apple use any technology from printed electronics, like silver ink, in the latest iPhone?

lol - Reply

If history is any guide as ALL Apple products have InvenSense gyros then we will see an integrated single 6 Axis from InvenSense. The Apple Watch must use a single 6 axis for everything to reduce power.

The only question is did Apple use InveSense GPS navigation Software?

Apple obviously has reduced GPS run time and rides the 6 Axis to reduce power consumption by up to 80% off time. This is what InveSense software specializes in and it has to be in the iWatch.

Will Apple do their own dead reconning algorithms or use InveSense SW?

KrisCo - Reply

I found a write up on a Chinese site that shows the Invensense Chip. http://www.microsofttranslator.com/bv.as...

Also here is a pic of its location: http://img.mp.itc.cn/upload/20160919/734...

Geeky1 -

Can anyone confirm if the camera lens cover and Home button are still sapphire? A few people have said, well, that they aren't.

Chris Brighton - Reply

Can a 6+ or 7+ battery suitable on a 6s+

shrini23 - Reply

Porque vocês não me dar um iphone, ao invés de quebrar-lo

fabinhod500 - Reply

Porquê vocês não me dar um iphone ao invés de quebrar-lo

fabinhod500 - Reply

I never understand why it takes so long for folks to figure out the accelerometers / gyros... It's nice to see that others have already identified the InvenSense 773C but I wish iFixit had figured it out first. Is this a living document? Will additional chips and information be added as the rest of the world figures it out? Regardless, great teardown guys! Thank you for doing this year after year!

Bob Powers - Reply

It would be interesting to know who makes the microphone(s). That's a small but important piece that few ever take much notice of.

Bob Powers - Reply

Is the camera sensor same as on 6s plus? I'm asking about the pixel and resolution. Not just the 12 megapixel total resolution. I know there is a new image processor. That's not the question. I want to know if this new sensor resolves for a better image quality than the iPhone 6 s plus. Practically speaking, is it (the 7 plus camera image sensor) a better film? Better pixels? Knowing the optics are improved for better optical resolution.

gwwakim - Reply

Compared a 7+ Jet Black to and 7+ Black and find the lightning connector is not flush on the Jet Black. Has a sharp edge protruding past the phones surface. Is this normal?

Bubs - Reply

If your lightning port is not flush it is not IP67?

Bubs - Reply

is this phone still susceptible to touch IC disease?

Jeremy - Reply

Does anyone know if there is any place that sells the parts of the IPhone 7 plus? I am a new repairer so I want to know where I can find these parts and also the screws and screwdrivers that were used to assemble this. I tried searching this online but most online shops have only iPhone 6s plus parts at the most.

Thanks!!!

Gypsum Chen - Reply

You are so well on your own way

AbdelHadi - Reply

iPhone 7 and now Google Pixel...which smartphone is best for us?

Just purchased the iphone 7 recently from wantITbuyIT and now im waiting for google pixel. The battery life is good unless you are doing something that involves a lot of processing power.

Jenny Jonson - Reply

More importantly did apple FIX the problem that causes Touch Disease in the iphone 6Plus and 6sPlus? you guys never took close photos of the chips to show if they had the epoxy potting that they should have.

timgray1 - Reply

A question: the power button has the rubber around or something for the waterproofing, like the sim tray?

Michele - Reply

There are indeed gaskets in the buttons, you can see them in the iPhone 7 teardown!

Sam Lionheart -

感谢你们翻译成中文来点视频

Gaonan - Reply

Does anyone know what series of aluminum the iPhone 7 plus uses? Thanks.

Albert B. Lopez - Reply

after replacing the touch pad of the 7plus the gps seems to jump around when on google map?

Riaan - Reply

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