Power Macintosh G3 Blue and White Teardown

Teardown

Teardown

Teardowns provide a look inside a device and should not be used as disassembly instructions.

Student-Created Guide

Student-Created Guide

An awesome student from our education program made this guide. It is not managed by iFixit staff.

The Powermac G3, apple's G3 Powerhouse. This computer Introduced the design that stuck until the powermac G5, but this computer started the "Handle's" Trend, every powermac G3, G4, G5, and Mac Pro now has handles. This computer boasted a 350Mhz, 400Mhz, and 450Mhz PowerPC G3 CPU. This cpu is incredibly easy to overclock, due to it's "clock-config" jumper convienlently located next to the CPU(though i don't encourage overclocking). This computer had blue plastic, resembelent of the iMac G3's and the iBook G3 Clamshells. It would have been great if Apple had made this is other colors, like the imac, a lime green Powermac G3 would rock!

Edit Step 1 Power Macintosh G3 Blue and White Teardown  ¶ 

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Edit Step 1 Power Macintosh G3 Blue and White Teardown  ¶ 

  • The Powermac G3 Blue And White

Edit Step 2  ¶ 

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Edit Step 2  ¶ 

  • Start By Disconnecting the computer, and lifting the tab on the side of the computer, and lowering the side panel.

Edit Step 3  ¶ 

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Edit Step 3  ¶ 

  • RAM

  • The PowerMac G3 B&W supports up to 1GB of PC100 RAM.

  • It has 4 RAM slots for an optimal configuration of 4x 256MB DIMM's.

Edit Step 4  ¶ 

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Edit Step 4  ¶ 

  • Removing The CPU

  • Start by using a flathead to gently pry off the clip, remember you have to put it back on again!

  • Then, remove the heatsink.

  • This reveals the Motorola PowerPC G3 CPU, this is the 400Mhz Model.

Edit Step 5  ¶ 

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  • Then, lift the metal retaining lever.

  • Then, lift the CPU out of it's socket.

  • This is the Motorola MPC106 PCI bridge and memory controller.

Edit Step 6  ¶ 

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Edit Step 6  ¶ 

  • The CPU: A Motorola XPC750MIP400CM (400Mhz PowerPC 750/G3) With 1Mb Of Level 2 Cache.

  • This is another one of those unique apple connectors, it it is a 288 pin keyed PGA socket.

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  • Graphics Card:

  • The Powermac G3 Came Standard With A 16MB ATI 3D Rage PCI Mac Edition Card, there are only a few available upgrade cards.

  • Start By Removing this Screw.

  • Once that's done, pull the card out.

  • Sorry Guys, Regular PCI Cards Won't work here, only Mac Edition PCI-Compatible Cards, and this card won't work in a PC, Also, graphics cards only work in the first slot, the other 4 PCI Slots won't support graphics cards.

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  • Firewire Module:

  • Unplug the power cable from the logic board.

  • Then close the case and remove this screw.

  • Then open it again.

Edit Step 9  ¶ 

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  • Then remove this screw too.

  • Then lift the module out, there is a connector underneath it, to be careful while doing this.

  • Then we can move on.

Edit Step 10  ¶ 

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Edit Step 10  ¶ 

  • Removing the Optical Drive/ZIP Drive Caddy:

  • Start by pushing in these tabs, and pulling the blue drive bezel out.

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  • This will reveal 2 phillips screws.

  • Remove them.

  • Then push the back of the cage out the front of the case far enough to remove the ribbon and power cables, than slide the cage completly out, and set it aside.

Edit Step 12  ¶ 

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Edit Step 12  ¶ 

  • Removing the drive cage:

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Edit Step 13  ¶ 

  • Removing the power supply

  • Disconnect the power connector from the logic board (this looks alot like a standard ATX connector. The lone difference is that the wire which supplies -5V on an ATX supply [pin 18] becomes a ground wire in the B&W G3. If you just plug in an ATX supply without any modifications, you'll short out its -5V output. )

  • There is a 4-Pin Cable connected to the front panel box, remove it.

  • Disconnect the internal fan cable.

  • The Fan Connector

  • Then Route all of the cables up through the case to the level of the power supply.

Edit Step 14  ¶ 

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Edit Step 14  ¶ 

  • Remove these phillips screws.

  • Now, you can slide the power supply towards you, and remove it.

  • Sorry, but my camera battery died, I will post photos on how to remove the logic board after I take them

Required Tools

Phillips #0 Screwdriver

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Comments Comments are onturn off

I dub thee Chris Green, The Teardown Machine. Good work!

Miroslav Djuric, · Reply

The CPU socket looks identical to Intel's socket 478.

Honam1021, · Reply

Actually, I have to call you on your comment about the PCI slots. I used to run a dual monitor setup on my B&W G3. I had an ATI Xclaim VR 128 installed in the second slot, giving me a second graphics card, with a TV tuner/AV input. It worked perfectly. The Tuner's software never made the transition to Mac OS X, sadly, so i had to boot into OS 9 any time I wanted to do recording, but it most definitely worked.

richfiles, · Reply

Yep, the pci slots will absolutely run graphics cards. If they didn't they wouldn't be pci slots. I also ran graphics cards off of them. However, they run like crud compared to the 66mhz slot, since they are shared and 33mhz. You can also run standard PC graphics cards, as long as there is a mac compatible rom that you can flash onto it. Reflashed cards used to sell on ebay for real good prices.

khlae,

the b&w g3 supports up to 1gb pc100 ram.

khlae, · Reply

Quote from khlae:

the b&w g3 supports up to 1gb pc100 ram.

Khale's right- my G3 currently has 1GB.

Josh Calvetti, · Reply

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