Tools Featured in this Teardown

Introduction

A few months ago, we pre-ordered the MicroBot Push, and we’ve been itching to try it out. Due to some manufacturing hiccups, the Push was only shipped out recently – just on time for this month's teardown!

Read the full story on: https://novemberfive.co/blog/hardware-te...

This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your Microbot Push, use our service manual.

Image 1/3: Image 2/3: Image 3/3:
  • Removing the 4 Torx screws and 1 regular one beneath the black rubber pad shows us a gearbox, 2 PCBs and a battery

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Image 1/3: Battery charging circuit Image 2/3: Charging IC Image 3/3: Transistor to control the red and green LEDS next to the USB port, indicating whether or not the battery is fully charged
  • According to its specs, the MicroBot has a battery life of about one year. The battery is rechargeable, using a regular 5V charger with a micro USB connector.

  • Battery charging circuit

    • Charging IC

    • Transistor to control the red and green LEDS next to the USB port, indicating whether or not the battery is fully charged

  • Battery protection circuit

    • These types of ICs are used to “sense” the current

    • When the specified current limit has been reached they trigger a switch that will break the current path to the battery. The switch that is triggered in this case is a Dual N-Channel Enhancement Mode Power MOSFET, in this case the 8205A

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Image 1/2: The big gold circle you see in the middle of the PCB is a capacitive touch button. It’s simply an exposed piece of copper Image 2/2: The TTP223B chip, this chip is a one-key touch pad detector that can detect the touch of a human finger on the touch pad. It does this by using the “Frequency Change” method
  • The capacitive touch button and matching circuitry (marked in red)

  • The big gold circle you see in the middle of the PCB is a capacitive touch button. It’s simply an exposed piece of copper

  • The TTP223B chip, this chip is a one-key touch pad detector that can detect the touch of a human finger on the touch pad. It does this by using the “Frequency Change” method

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Image 1/2: The bluetooth chip, in this case the nRF51822 Nordic Semiconductors (It’s a 2.4GHz ultra low-power bluetooth chip built around a 32-bit ARM® Cortex™ M0 CPU) Image 2/2: To the right of the nRF51822, you can see two oscillators, one 16MHz and one 32.768kHz (marked in orange), which generate the clock waveforms for the CPU
  • The bluetooth chip and antenna (I had to remove a metal shield to reveal the chip;)

  • The bluetooth chip, in this case the nRF51822 Nordic Semiconductors (It’s a 2.4GHz ultra low-power bluetooth chip built around a 32-bit ARM® Cortex™ M0 CPU)

  • To the right of the nRF51822, you can see two oscillators, one 16MHz and one 32.768kHz (marked in orange), which generate the clock waveforms for the CPU

  • On the bottom (marked in yellow) you see the antenna circuitry and the PCB antenna itself. As you can see, they did not use a balun chip, but instead created a matching network using some capacitors and inductors.

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Image 1/1: I could not trace back the datasheets of the actual components used, but after probing the upper IC with an oscilloscope I noticed that this is also a voltage regulator. This one boosts the voltage from 2.5 volts back to 4 volts to power the motor and the motor controller
  • This circuit is located on the back of the PCB

  • I could not trace back the datasheets of the actual components used, but after probing the upper IC with an oscilloscope I noticed that this is also a voltage regulator. This one boosts the voltage from 2.5 volts back to 4 volts to power the motor and the motor controller

  • Motor driver

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Image 1/3: If we count all teeth of the gears we come up with a speed reduction of 948.41 Image 2/3: If we count all teeth of the gears we come up with a speed reduction of 948.41 Image 3/3: If we count all teeth of the gears we come up with a speed reduction of 948.41
  • Opening up the gearbox was fairly simple: I just had to remove two screws to expose the gears and the motor

  • If we count all teeth of the gears we come up with a speed reduction of 948.41

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November Five

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