iPod nano Gen 2 Replacement Battery

$13.95

Product code: IF199-003

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iPod nano Gen 2 Replacement Battery

$13.95

Product code: IF199-003

Product Overview

Installation requires soldering of battery to logic board.

Compatibility

Identify your iPod

  • All 2nd Generation iPod Nanos

Product Details

  • Model #: 616-0283
  • Capacity: 400 mAh

$15.95 Fix Kit

 
 

Condition:

New

Notes:

Fix Kit Contents:

  • New 400 mAh Replacement Battery
  • Small Phillips #00 Screwdriver
  • Plastic Opening Tool
  • Spudger

Additional Required Tools:

$13.95 Part Only

 
 

Condition:

New

Notes:

This option includes the battery only, no tools.

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Compatibility

iPod Nano 2nd Generation
2 GB
4 GB
8 GB
 

Stories

My Problem

This iPod had been washed long ago, and the battery was dead

My Fix

Unfortunately this iPod had been heavily used an abused by my son, such that the back of the case was a bit dented in a few spots (and the corners were a bit rounded in). The main problem seems to be that the back dents decreased the internal space to the point that the logic board couldn't slide out. I eventually put enough pressure on it to break other parts but the logic board never moved more then about 5mm.

My Advice

If your iPod is too dented up, it may not be possible to slide the logic board out. It has to slide past the click wheel and it's components, and if you've lost just a little free space, it may not be possible.

My Problem

The battery after several years did not work anymore....

My Fix

I used the Guide to remove the battery and put a new one

My Advice

Everything works fine!

My Problem

My iPod Nano is 6 years old and will not hold a charge for about a year now. Decided to replace the battery so I don't have to have it plugged in to use it.

My Fix

Received the new battery and tools. The screwdriver is fine but the plastic tool to remove the ends broke right away. I used a small screw driver it worked fine. The hardest part of the job was trying to get the solder out of the holes to put in the new wires. I finally heated the solder and inserted a needle to leave a hole. All went fine from there. I have charged it overnight and will play it today non stop to see how long it lasts.

My Advice

Hopefully the plastic tools are stronger. I saw one video that showed to use what I think is called desoldering strip. This sucks up the solder and if it clears the holes it would sure make it easier. Other than that it is pretty straight forward. I replaced the battery in my 20 Gig iPod and it went lots smoother.

Trevor Bugera's Story Photo #153784
Trevor Bugera's Story Photo #153785
Trevor Bugera's Story Photo #153786

My Problem

Both my wife's iPod Mini and her friend's iPod Nano had terrible battery life, and recently the Mini started showing the "Sad iPod" icon. I thought if I replaced the battery, the Mini might get a proper charge, and I could also check the hard drive's connection.

My Fix

Overall, the repair was 50/50. The Nano change over went well, other than the control wheel's connection coming apart just as I fed the rest of the ribbon cable in. The spudger made getting the connection together easier. The Mini's battery was faster to change, but the Sad iPod is still there. The iSesamo made taking off the covers easier; my experience with the plastic tools is iffy, but the iSesamo worked like a breeze over and over.

My Advice

Desoldering the battery wires from the Nano really needed a vice to hold the board so it wouldn't move. I had to use my 7-year old's hands instead.

My Problem

battery was running down. I was disappointed that the battery that once lasted nearly a day was only giving me 3 hours.

My Fix

It took 3 hours. It was kind of hard getting the case open and the battery was held in with strong tape. The battery wires were covered in hard to remove silicone and I didn't have any desoldering equipment. Also, I stripped one screw and lost another. I decided to put the remaining screws into areas that were easily accessible and forget about the others.

My Advice

Make sure you have good desoldering equipment and a proper screwdriver. The one included was not quite the right fit; that's why I stripped a screw. It would have been nice if some desoldering braid was included with the kit

My Problem

Exausted battery

My Fix

Well, almost exactly how explained in the guide. We fixed the battery cables instead of removing them.

My Advice

Be really careful with step 11 when reassembling!

My Problem

The Nano had stopped holding a charge.

My Fix

Fairly well given the very high difficulty of the repair. The end result was success.

My Advice

Desoldering the old battery was definitely the hardest part. Desoldering braid is a must, however it was impossible to remove every last bit of solder necessary to free the wires. I had success placing the shaft of a small screwdriver through the loops of battery wire on the backside of the board and using it to apply tension to the wire while heating the front side with the iron. With tension on the wire, it would pop free from the board once the solder pad was heated. I also needed to use a pin to ream out the holes in the board just a bit to get the new battery wires through. A hands-free magnifier was also very helpful in making the repair.

My Problem

Original battery only held charge for 10 minutes.

My Fix

Repair went ok for first time ipod repair. Taking it apart wasn't bad. A bit more of a challenge putting it back together.

My Advice

After repair, appeared that iPod was not working. Required reset after installing new battery. Flip Hold switch back and forth a couple times then press and hold Menu and Center button down at the same time for about 10 seconds.

thitipongtanprasert's Story Photo #133933
thitipongtanprasert's Story Photo #133935

My Problem

Three main problems for me :

1. The plastic pryer (green) didn't work well for me. It was finally crumpled. So I used a small flat-head screw-driver instead. Slightly scratched the nano but not significant.

2. I have no lead-removing strip. But a rather big vacuum one. Successfully cleaned up one hole. The other two holes, I melted the lead and quickly inserted the wire in. Not too difficult with proper clamping. What's quite nervous was I was afraid that I would've heated the hole for too long.

3. Sliding the inner parts back into the shell left some glue residue on the inside of display cover. I had to slide things back off, cleaned the inside of the display cover with alcohol, placed a long sheet of thin paper to shield the inside of the display cover, slid the whole things in, and pulled the thin paper out. Quite messed up in practice, but it's OK overall.

My Fix

Work perfectly. Can't be happier. The battery is charged faster and holds the energy longer. Seems even better than when I first had the nano.

My Advice

The delivery was much faster than the expected.

I'm an experienced electronic/digital DIYer. I still faced some situations that I had to decide and develop my own way to get things proceed. A little more detailed steps and some explanation of parts may help people develop their alternative solution, if they need to.