iMac Intel 27" Mid 2011 Dual Hard Drive Kit

$29.95

Product code: IF174-002

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iMac Intel 27" Mid 2011 Dual Hard Drive Kit

$29.95

Product code: IF174-002

Product Overview

Dual drive power in your 27" iMac.

  • The complete kit includes all the tools and cables you need to install a second drive. Just add an iMac and new hard drive or SSD of your choice.
  • This kit is compatible with all processor speeds, regardless of whether or not Apple offers the additional SSD option for your machine.
  • This kit does not require permanently removing your optical drive.
  • We recommend installing an SSD and using it as your boot drive or a 1 TB hard drive for more storage space.

Note: this kit will only work in Mid 2011 27" iMacs. We also offer an equivalent dual hard drive kit for the Mid 2011 21.5" iMac.

Compatibility

Identify your Mac

  • All Mid 2011 27" iMacs

Product Details

$29.95 Complete Kit

 

Condition:

New

Notes:

Complete Kit includes:

$19.95 No Tools

 

Condition:

New

Notes:

No Tools Kit includes:

  • Custom SATA power & data cable
  • Custom-cut 3M mounting tape
Add to Cart
 

Compatibility

iMac Intel 27"
2.7 GHz (Core i5)
3.1 GHz (Core i5)
3.4 GHz (Core i7)
 

Stories

Sebastian's Story Photo #872819
Sebastian's Story Photo #872820
Sebastian's Story Photo #872821

My Problem

My iMac first started showing symptoms by rebooting intermittently. A few days later, the infamous thick bars would appear on the display, at which point the iMac would reboot. The computer would boot back to the desktop and would be usable for a very short period of time before repeating the cycle.

A replacement graphics card for this model (directly from Apple) will run you about $400, plus labor. For that price, you’re better off getting a re-balled 2GB version of the card on eBay for about $300. I work as a repair tech, so I’m used to digging through the innards of Apple machines. I had heard/read of people bringing their graphics cards back to life by simply baking them before I began this whole repair. Considering the price for a replacement/repair, I figured what the !&&*, in the oven you go!

My Fix

I preheated the oven and baked the graphics card for about 10-12 minutes @ ~380-390°F (about 200°C). I then let the card cool down for about 30 minutes. In the meantime, I thoroughly cleaned the graphics card heat sink using alcohol pads and also took the time to clean out the rest of iMac. Once the card cooled down, I cleaned the GPU chip and memory modules again (they were cleaned before the card went in the oven) and reapplied the thermal paste/pads. I used Arctic Silver 5- people might say it’s overrated, but it’s always given me the lowest temps on all of my builds. Once all the new thermal material was applied, I reinstalled the graphics card heatsink & reassembled the rest of the machine.

I plugged the iMac in and powered it on. As soon as I heard the chime and the display turned on (joy!), I reset the PRAM/NVRAM. The iMac power-cycled and then booted successfully to the desktop. So far so good. I let the computer run for a minute or two, rebooted, and ran diagnostics- every component passed except for the HDD temperature sensor. I was already aware of this, as I had upgraded to a 3TB HDD which did not include the port for the temp. cable (this is the case with the majority of non-Apple branded HDDs). This issue can be solved by using fan control/monitoring software, such as HDD/SSD Fan Control. Otherwise, I highly recommend OWC’s In-line Digital Thermal Sensor, which easily attaches to the HDDs current power cable. You can then peel the adhesive on the included thermal sensor and place it directly on the HDD. Regardless of whether you choose the software or hardware fix, they both remedy the sensor issue- or rather, the fan issue (HDD fan spinning at over 4000rpm).

My Advice

Post-repair, my average GPU Die temperature is posting at about 45°C during normal use. I ran Unigine Valley Benchmark using all of the “basic” presets, with the exception of selecting 1920×1080 instead of 1280×720 as the resolution. I ran the GPU stress test under these conditions for about 15 minutes. The GPU Die temp slowly began to rise, peaking at around 90°C (I later ran an extended test for about 8 hours and the log indicates that the temperature never exceeded 93°C). Comparing those numbers to my pre-repair temperatures: ~60°C during normal use, 100-105°C during heavy use, I’d say the new thermal compound is working its magic! Although 90°C is on the higher side when it comes to graphics card temperatures, these cards can safely operate up to 100°C under heavy load. I should also mention that the iMac did not crash at any point during the GPU stress testing.

Judging by the overall temps of the machine, I can definitely see that the repair helped. I’m pretty happy with these temperatures- running the GPU stress test is probably the most… stress… the iMac will experience. The computer is primarily used for day-to-day tasks (email, web, etc.) as well as photo editing using Adobe Photoshop & Lightroom, with some occasional video editing/encoding. I don’t expect to see the GPU temp go above 80°C. If I ever feel uneasy about the GPU temp, I can always get the fans to kick in using iStat Menus (or any other fan control software).

The iMac has been powered on for exactly 1 week now with no issues! I just installed a Samsung 850 Pro SSD underneath the ODD, while keeping the 3TB HDD in the main bay for storage. Speed-wise, the iMac is giving some of the new models a good run for their money!

My Problem

Adding a new SSD drive to my iMac

My Fix

The instructions are great and easy to follow. It went really well and fired right up after putting everything back together.

My Advice

Practice putting the connectors back together as soon as you disconnect them. The first couple are hard to figure out when you've been doing other things for a while.

Corey's Story Photo #860759
Corey's Story Photo #860763
Corey's Story Photo #860762

My Problem

The problem - Slower startup and overall performance.

My Fix

The repair went well ! It did take longer than i thought about 1 and a half hours. I think that was because i was being overly cautious. I ended up installing a Crucial MX200 500GB SSD behind the DVD drive and then replaced the internal Drive with a 3TB Seagate Drive.

My Advice

This was totally worth it ! The speed and perfermance of the new drive has brought new life into my machine. It boots so much faster, in the images above you will see boot time before the upgrade and boot time after the upgrade. This is from turning on the power to logged in. It runs games and just about every thing i do so much faster now.

One thing i also did was set the 3TB drive to be the home folder of the user account this way I'm not messing up the SSD with files I'm working on and can leave the SSD to run Apps or games and the system. I will say you probably want a little understanding of how the terminal works to get the 2nd Drive to be the home folder drive. Some goggling will tell you how to set it up. Im getting 550MBs read speed and 535MBs write speed on the SSD and then 250MBs read and 225MBs write to the new Hard drive. I will say that the tweezers that came in the repair toolkit are kinda weak so i went to a local computer store and bought some higher quality ones. The Suction cups are great and the bag every thing comes in works great as a way to store them so they don't get dusty. The build information was good on the site and i also looked for a few videos just to see what others had done.

My Problem

The iMac got very slow lately. There seems to be a problem with the newer OSX releases running on magnetic disk only. A dual HD solution with an SSD boot and OS disk and a magnetic storage disk for the rest fixes this.

My Fix

The repair went very well. It was not an easy fix, but I managed to do it in one evening.

My Advice

Putting the logic board back in place can be difficult. I used some painters tape to keep all the cables back, so they could not get stuck under the logic board.

Watch out for the location of the SATA connector for the optical drive, I accidentally let it come out at the wrong position, so I had to redo the logic board removal.

blackphantomllt's Story Photo #772624

My Problem

After upgrading to el capitan, imac was extremely slow no matter how I tried to resolve it. Suggested to my old man "lets turn it into a rocket ship"...... and here we are.

My Fix

Smooth, took about 2 hours to do. After installing the SSD, I did a clean El capitan install on it, leaving the SSD for the OS to make it nice and snappy. The old 1TB Mechanical HDD is now just for storage :)

My Advice

Make sure you have plenty of room so you can turn the imac in the direction you feel most comfortable working! You also need a good sized flat surface to place the glass and screen down. When moving the logic board out of the way to put the SATA cable in, its best to stand the iMac up.

My Problem

iMac was slowed to a molasses pace starting with Mavericks and degrading with Yosemite to intolerable with el capitan

My Fix

Took me about 5 hours with snl and infomercials playing through the wee hours but once done it worked like a charm without a hitch throughout the upgrade.

My Advice

Perhaps one final reminder to put all the screws back in that hold the display attached to the stand BEFORE putting the glass covering back on.

My bad, but frustrating after such a long repair.

My Problem

Last year I bought a new SSD. My first intention was to put it in my iMac but at the time I was lack the tool and necessary motivation to do it. So instead, I put the SSD in my work MBP 13". The performance I got is amazing, especially when it comes to using VMWare. The lag every time the VM write to disk is gone completely despite the significantly less memory compare to iMac (32GB).

So, I simply want that kind of performance on my iMac.

My Fix

The upgrade is pretty much straight forward according to the guide. However, putting back the circuit board is a lot more difficult than expected, especially when I try not to break it into pieces. After putting it back and reconnect all the cable, everything work great! (Although the first time I boot up, I forgot to put the ram back so it beeps!)

I also replacing the 1TB drive with the new 4TB drive. Install the OS on the SSD. Here's come the best part about this upgrade. I create symbolic link on home folder (of SSD) for some of the data residing on the 4TB. Which data to do is totally base on each individual's desire and preferences. I try my best to balance out the performance I will get for storing data on SSD and storing data on 4TB HDD to not overly stress out the SSD IO. This technique is the best thing I learned since I switch from Windows.

My Advice

I don't have any thing to add except be careful when pulling out the placing the circuit board. Apple make it pretty much perfect fit! There is one angle in and out. So, remember that feeling when you pull it out.

rpelec1's Story Photo #604759
rpelec1's Story Photo #604760
rpelec1's Story Photo #604761

My Problem

The 1Tb Seagate in my Mid-2011 looked like it was developing bad sectors and caused some unrecoverable boot issues. I think the machine would have qualified for the 1tb replacement programme but the programme was already closed...time for some DIY and an opportunity to upgrade too :)

My Fix

Taking apart my baby wasn't a decision I took lightly but the iFixit guide was comprehensive and very easy to follow using my iPad as a companion. Also the iFixit Dual Drive kit and toolset was good quality and easy to use. Disassembly and reassembly took maybe 1.25hrs and the iMac booted back up first time no trouble :)

My Advice

I took the opportunity to replace the 1Tb for a 3Tb (Seagate again, to avoid fan issues) and also added a 250Gb Samsung SSD as my OS boot drive. I put 'Yosemite' onto the SSD before starting using CMD-R and a SATA/USB Dock. I also formatted the 3Tb so it was ready for immediate use in the same way too.

There are a couple of recommendations :-

a) A can of air duster would be a great addition your 'arsenal' of tools - it's surprising how much dust the fans had drawn into my machine....and a handy can of air duster would have been much more wieldy than a hoover nozzle.

b) Get the screen cleaner before you start - I was too eager once the iFixit kit and the new drives arrived. I ended up leaving my glass off overnight so I could make a shopping trip for screen cleaner in the morning.

c) When you get to the end of disassembly and are ready to rebuild, re-read ALL the steps backwards. The guide says something like start reassembly at step 27 but if you miss 28 + etc you risk missing a vital process such as screwing the logic board back in. I worked my way backwards one step at a time and am glad I did...It's hairy enough taking your machine apart once, you don't want to be experiencing the panic of a 'dead machine' because something in the later steps has been inadvertently skipped and then have to disassemble the machine again ...this time in a (slight) panic.

My Problem

Wanted to change my old and veeery slow 1 TB hard disk with a 1 TB quick Samsung SSD

My Fix

Much easier than I thought - note that I'm a first timer in opening a 27" iMac!! After reading everything related and watching the video it only took me astonishing twenty (20 !) minutes to perform this change.

My Advice

No advice - it simply works as described... It is a pleasure to not hear my hard disk make noise all the time anymore - just faaantastic !!!

My Problem

Wanted to change my old and veeery slow 1 GB hard disk with a 1 TB quick Samsung SSD

My Fix

Much easier than I thought - note that I'm a first timer in opening a 27" iMac!! After reading everything related and watching the video it only took me astonishing twenty (20 !) minutes to perform this change.

My Advice

No advice - it simply works as described... It is a pleasure to not hear my hard disk make noise all the time anymore - just faaantastic !!!