MacBook Pro 13" Unibody (Mid 2009 through Mid 2012) Trackpad

$89.95

Product code: IF163-025
Apple Part #: 922-9063, 922-9525, 922-9773

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MacBook Pro 13" Unibody (Mid 2009 through Mid 2012) Trackpad

$89.95

Product code: IF163-025
Apple Part #: 922-9063, 922-9525, 922-9773

Product Overview

Trackpad problems getting you down?

Wrangle your unruly cursor with a well behaved trackpad! No more more random mouse jumping, missed clicks, or erratic tracking - regain control of your computer and point and click that cursor to wherever your heart desires.

Feel confident in your purchase - all of our Used Trackpads are cosmetically inspected and functionally tested in house and come with a 1 year warranty. Help extend the life of your computer with a used trackpad and feel good knowing that you've part of a sustainable economy and have kept a functional part out of the landfill.

Compatibility

Identify your Mac

  • All Mid 2009 13" Unibody MacBook Pros
  • All Mid 2010 13" Unibody MacBook Pros
  • All Early 2011 13" Unibody MacBook Pros
  • All Late 2011 13" Unibody MacBook Pros
  • All Mid 2012 13" Unibody MacBook Pros

Product Details

  • Model: A1278

$89.95 With Screws / New

 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

One year warranty

Notes:

Includes the 4 mounting screws and the set screw.

$69.95 With Screws / A-Stock

 
 
 

Condition:

Used, fully tested

Warranty:

One year warranty

Notes:

Includes 4 mounting screws but not the set screw.

$54.95 Without Screws / A-Stock

 
 
 

Condition:

Used, fully tested

Warranty:

One year warranty

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Replacement Guides

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Early 2011

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Late 2011

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2009

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2010

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Compatibility

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Early 2011
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
2.7 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Late 2011
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.8 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2009
2.26 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.53 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2010
2.4 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012
2.5 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.9 GHz (Mid 2012)
 

Stories

Matt Meola's Story Photo #480139

My Problem

Trackpad was acting cray-zay - cursor would jitter and jump around, open mission control (3 finger swipe gesture), randomly scroll (2 finger gesture) etc.

Confirmed it was only the trackpad by using a mouse and turning the trackpad off. No known spills and the battery wasn't bloated.

My Fix

Easy peasy. Took ~30-40 minutes to replace the trackpad, dust out the inside, swap in a SSD, and pop some new ram in. Machine is like new.

My Advice

Check the clicking action on your trackpad once you have it screwed in place and before you reassemble anything. There's an adjustment torx screw on the front facing underside of the trackpad. In my case, the trackpad was just flopping around not clicking and I had to tigten the adjustment screw a bit.

My Problem

Spilled orange juice on my Macbook Pro a while ago, and recently the mouse had started acting crazy and erratic, jumping around and not going where I wanted it to.

My Fix

Replaced the trackpad and battery, since it seemed like trackpad issues were often battery expansion issues. Took about 15 minutes. The online guide was really helpful, especially the color-coded guide to screw size and placement.

My Advice

I bought my new battery from Amazon, and it came with a tip for SMC reset: shut down the computer, plug in the power cord, and press shift-control-option (left side) and the power button at the same time. Then let go of all four and turn on the computer!

My Problem

My son's five year old college MacBook Pro's trackpad stopped working. The click function no longer worked. I bought him a new MacBook Air and asked to repurpose his old one.

My Fix

The repair went smoothly except for the teeny tiny screws were very hard to get back into the holes with the computer standing up on edge. I finally padded the space between the screen and trackpad a bit with some soft tissue and was able to place the computer face down so that I could get a gravity assist in dropping the screws into the holes.

My Advice

I should have purchased an magnetic tipped screwdriver for the task. This would have helped a ton.

Trackpad now works perfect.

My Problem

Battery had popped a huge bulge and ruined the track pad.

My Fix

Very smooth and simple to do. Great toolkit!

My Advice

Make sure you have the right tools!

My Problem

My trackpad wasn't working fine, sometimes the cursor stopped and then started moving alone.

My Fix

I changed the trackpad in about 15 minutes .

My Advice

Save the screws position after you remove it.

My Problem

My battery not only wore out it swelled in my laptop which cracked my trackpad. The trackpad could no longer click and my laptop wouldn't close all the way.

My Fix

Replacing the battery and trackpad was super easy. The only hard part is threading the trackpad connector to the motherboard. It took me a couple of tries. With the bloated battery out and the new trackpad and battery my computer is like new again.

My Advice

Make sure you have the tri-wing screwdriver.

My Problem

The trackpad on my trusty ol' mid-2009 MBP had started to act bizarro: It was occasionally non-responsive, and sometimes, it'd go totally mental and register multiple inputs (sometimes multi-touch inputs) simultaneously.

I'd originally thought that there might be some sort of software issue, as the Trackpad System Preferences pane had gone non-functional ("Could not load Trackpad Preference Pane"), and when I Airdropped a working file from another computer, it worked for a moment, but then it would crash System Preferences.

More time spent searching suggested that it was hardware related — spoiler alert: It was.

My Fix

The repair was incredibly straightforward with the help of the step-by-step guide, and the tools from iFixit were perfect. Note: even if you don't think you need a Spudger, you do — I've been living without one and making due for a while, but holy crap, is it a great little tool.

My Advice

There seemed to be a small amount of adhesive on my battery so getting it out of the case was by far the most difficult part of the procedure. I don't know if that's standard procedure these days (my battery was replaced at the Apple Store about a year ago — sidebar: if I had that to do over again, I'd DIY it... so easy).

I ordered a used trackpad with screws from iFixit, and though the trackpad is great, the screws were the wrong size. To be honest, I don't know why you'd need replacement screws unless you were to over-torque and break the ones that are already there. I'd recommend saving the dollars and reusing the ones that are currently in your machine.

My Problem

My daughter mentioned coffee...

My Fix

Very well although my fingers are way too big for those tiny screws.

My Advice

Just do it.

My Problem

Trackpad was not working. After seeing some bad advice on YouTube about how to fix it by "pushing on it", it just got worse and cracked the trackpad ...

My Fix

Replacement was quick and iFixit instructions were spot on. The tools etc. + spudger, were essential. Only thing was that after install, the clicking action was not sensitive enough. I ended up adjusting the torx screw that is associated with trackpad (beneath the battery) to get the clicking action fixed.

My Advice

I didn't see anything in the iFixit guides that talks about the torx screw that adjusts the sensitivity of the trackpad. Its worth googling and checking. It might be all you need instead of replacing the trackpad.

My Problem

my trackpad was giving me problems and I didn't have the tools to fix it.

My Fix

Considering I have never worked on a computer or taken one apart, it went very well. only took about 10 minutes.

My Advice

Youtube is your friend. You can save a lot of money by putting in a little research and fixing the issue yourself.