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Edit by Andrew Optimus Goldheart

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[* black] Let's just remove the camera bar. Oh wait.
[* black] There are tons of connectorsseveral cables leading into the LCD in orderside of the display assembly. Our bet is that these control the parallax barrier, used to generate that sweet, sweetawesome glasses-less 3D action. Unfortunately, all the cables are routed through oneeffect.
[* black] What's a [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallax_barrier|parallax barrier|new_window=true]? Imagine placing a very small picket fence in front
of your screen, so that when you look at the hingesdisplay, each eye sees different pixels while they peer around the fence boards.
[* black] ButThen, with a bitcombination of good news: the LCD assembly is only mildly adhered tomagic of geometry, and the framenew face-tracking "Super Stable 3D", the 3DS knows which pixels each eye can see, and pops out easilydraws two overlapping versions of the same scene—one for each eye. The combination of these two versions gets slapped together in your thinkpan as a sweet, sweet stereoscopic 3D image.
[* black] There are tons of connectorsseveral cables leading into the LCD in orderside of the display assembly. Our bet is that these control the parallax barrier, used to generate that sweet, sweetawesome glasses-less 3D action. Unfortunately, all the cables are routed through oneeffect.
[* black] What's a [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallax_barrier|parallax barrier|new_window=true]? Imagine placing a very small picket fence in front
of your screen, so that when you look at the hingesdisplay, each eye sees different pixels while they peer around the fence boards.
[* black] ButThen, with a bitcombination of good news: the LCD assembly is only mildly adhered tomagic of geometry, and the framenew face-tracking "Super Stable 3D", the 3DS knows which pixels each eye can see, and pops out easilydraws two overlapping versions of the same scene—one for each eye. The combination of these two versions gets slapped together in your thinkpan as a sweet, sweet stereoscopic 3D image.

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