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Edit by Miroslav Djuric

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[* black] Chipworks has confirmed that the MEMS gyroscope found inside the iPhone 4 is nearly identical to an off-the-shelf STMicroelectronics [link|http://www.st.com/stonline/products/families/sensors/l3g4200d.htm|L3G4200D] gyroscope.
[* black] The picture of the die you see on the left is that of the GK10A MEMS die, found in the L3G4200D.
[* black] The GK10A is comprised of a plate, called the "proof mass," that vibrates ([link|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscillate|oscillates]) when a drive signal is applied to set of drive capacitor plates.
[* black] When a user rotates the phone, the proof mass gets displaced in the X, Y, and Z directionsdirections by [link|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coriolis_effect|coriolis] forces. An [link|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application-specific_integrated_circuit|ASIC] processor senses the proof mass' displacement through capacitor plates located underneath the proof mass, as well as finger capacitors at the edges of the package.
[* black] When a user rotates the phone, the proof mass gets displaced in the X, Y, and Z directionsdirections by [link|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coriolis_effect|coriolis] forces. An [link|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application-specific_integrated_circuit|ASIC] processor senses the proof mass' displacement through capacitor plates located underneath the proof mass, as well as finger capacitors at the edges of the package.