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Changes to Recalibrating laptop batteries Introduction

Edit by Sam Goldheart

Edit approved by Sam Goldheart

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Introduction
If your laptop battery is a couple of years old and is beginning to fail or you suspect the reported information is incorrect, one thing you can do (outside of replacing the battery) is to recalibrate the battery. This process does not restore lost capacity, but is useful to give you an idea of how much life actually remains on the battery. ++ '''Guide notes''' ++ * It is very unlikely you will see a capacity increase through recalibration. It is far more likely your battery has unaccounted wear that was never logged and recalibration will simply force the battery to take this wear into account. This is NOT a bad thing. * If your laptop does not allow you to use it when the battery hits a certain percentage (notably HP), you will need to find a workaround to calibrate the battery properly. The workaround for this will vary based on what type of BIOS is used (or in some cases, per series), so you will need to figure out what "works" for your specific laptop. * '''WARNING: If your laptop's battery gets hot to the touch and is beyond warm, measure the temperature of the battery. If the battery is running hot (~70-80 degrees Celsius), the battery should be considered damaged and be replaced!''' * Once the battery is charging, it is best to let your laptop do it's thing and avoid using it. Using it is unlikely to harm anything, but this can affect the accuracy of the recalibration. * Batteries with a high wear percentage may be damaged by doing this. Be prepared to replace your battery if this happens. [ … ] battery today to 100%. Use the laptop until the battery hits 0% and shuts off. Immediately charge the laptop until it is fully charged.
If your laptop battery is a couple of years old and is beginning to fail or you suspect the reported information is incorrect, one thing you can do (outside of replacing the battery) is to recalibrate the battery. This process does not restore lost capacity, but is useful to give you an idea of how much life actually remains on the battery. ++ '''Guide notes''' ++ * It is very unlikely you will see a capacity increase through recalibration. It is far more likely your battery has unaccounted wear that was never logged and recalibration will simply force the battery to take this wear into account. This is NOT a bad thing. * If your laptop does not allow you to use it when the battery hits a certain percentage (notably HP), you will need to find a workaround to calibrate the battery properly. The workaround for this will vary based on what type of BIOS is used (or in some cases, per series), so you will need to figure out what "works" for your specific laptop. * '''WARNING: If your laptop's battery gets hot to the touch and is beyond warm, measure the temperature of the battery. If the battery is running hot (~70-80 degrees Celsius), the battery should be considered damaged and be replaced!''' * Once the battery is charging, it is best to let your laptop do it's thing and avoid using it. Using it is unlikely to harm anything, but this can affect the accuracy of the recalibration. * Batteries with a high wear percentage may be damaged by doing this. Be prepared to replace your battery if this happens. [ … ] battery today to 100%. Use the laptop until the battery hits 0% and shuts off. Immediately charge the laptop until it is fully charged.