Introduction

This is a great design but with a crucial flaw. If you go to the Rubbermaid website and look at the Reveal's user reviews mostly everyone loves the mop but has the same complaint - the unit stops spraying. It's often blamed on the handle/trigger but it's actually the pump plunger/piston that binds and gets stuck in it's cylinder. You will need to open the pump case and pull the assembly out. Once you get it out you'll see it's actually pretty simple with not many parts to worry about. It is a bit fussy to reassemble but not at all complicated.

Image 1/2: Notice in photo 2 the red pump casing sleeve and the tiny spray nozzle hole. Image 2/2: Notice in photo 2 the red pump casing sleeve and the tiny spray nozzle hole.
  • Trigger starts having problems - it sticks, returns slowly or won't return at all. No spray comes out of mop dispensing nozzle at base of pump chamber.

  • Notice in photo 2 the red pump casing sleeve and the tiny spray nozzle hole.

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Image 1/1:
  • You will need a long, thin, Phillips (star head) screw driver. The Reveal has 3 screws holding the main pump body. You can easily see the 2 on the body and 1 right where the stem meets the mop swivel head.

UPDATE: The second mop repaired had 4 screws. Unscrew all of them and move the red sleeve down so you can open the main pump body.

Leonard - Reply

One of the 4 screws may not be visible until the nozzle casing sleeve (red) is slide down.

alanhaddow - Reply

Image 1/1: NOTE! You do not need to separate the pump case all the way down to the bottom where the stem meets the red swivel for the mop head. The screw here needs to be losened off enough for you to be able to separate the main body above it.
  • Once the screws are removed the pump body can be split open. Use a thin flat head screw driver and do this slowly - do not just bust it open as you may damage parts. Pay close attention to the inside parts. You will need to wiggle down the spray pump nozzle casing sleeve (red) that also acts to hold the 2 pump body panels in place.

  • NOTE! You do not need to separate the pump case all the way down to the bottom where the stem meets the red swivel for the mop head. The screw here needs to be losened off enough for you to be able to separate the main body above it.

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Image 1/1: It is helpful to know that the red cone shape attaches to the outside liquid container (where you put in your cleaning solution).
  • Lay out the parts just as you see here. It is important to understand how these simple parts work together. You don't need to completely take apart every little piece.

  • It is helpful to know that the red cone shape attaches to the outside liquid container (where you put in your cleaning solution).

  • The silver rod with 2 holes is the mop handle. It attaches to the pump plunger/piston. Keep this in mind for later assembly.

UPDATE: Be sure to not pull the rod inside the handle out too far (thx to J.Hill for the tip)

Leonard - Reply

Image 1/2: Photo 2 shows the plunger/piston sanded so it works nicely in the cylinder without having taken off too much material - you do not want to take off too much. It doesn't need to be super pretty smooth but sanding too rough and uneven will not keep suction. Sand a little at a time and test it at each and every attempt. Image 2/2: When you are satisfied put a small amount of petrolium jelly (Vaseline) around the plunger/pistons head and ribs.
  • The problem is that the plastic pump plunger/piston sticks in the cylinder. Use 120 grit sandpaper and EVENLY sand the circumference of the plunger head and the 2 ribs below it. Test. Repeat until there is better movement but NO loss of suction.

  • Photo 2 shows the plunger/piston sanded so it works nicely in the cylinder without having taken off too much material - you do not want to take off too much. It doesn't need to be super pretty smooth but sanding too rough and uneven will not keep suction. Sand a little at a time and test it at each and every attempt.

  • When you are satisfied put a small amount of petrolium jelly (Vaseline) around the plunger/pistons head and ribs.

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Image 1/3: Notice in the 2nd and 3rd photos the mop rod (that connects the handle to the pump body). It has another rod inside that attaches to the plunger/pistion to make it go up/down in the cylinder. This needs to connect properly to the top of the plunger/piston AND be properly seated into the pump casing. Image 2/3: Test your assembly by simply placing the 2 pump body casings together - they should fit tightly and the trigger should work the pump smoothly. Image 3/3: Once you are satisfied everything inside fits properly put the pump case back together, careful to line it up so it fits perfectly snug with no gaps and the entire pump assembly is seated and secure. Ttighten up the screws.
  • Hold open the pump body casing and align the pump parts into the grooves supplied inside. This isn't hard and makes sense as you move them into place ... take your time.

  • Notice in the 2nd and 3rd photos the mop rod (that connects the handle to the pump body). It has another rod inside that attaches to the plunger/pistion to make it go up/down in the cylinder. This needs to connect properly to the top of the plunger/piston AND be properly seated into the pump casing.

  • Test your assembly by simply placing the 2 pump body casings together - they should fit tightly and the trigger should work the pump smoothly.

  • Once you are satisfied everything inside fits properly put the pump case back together, careful to line it up so it fits perfectly snug with no gaps and the entire pump assembly is seated and secure. Ttighten up the screws.

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Conclusion

Your mop has been saved from the garbage. I've tested this for about 6 months and still going strong no problems. Happy mopping!

10 other people completed this guide.

Len

Member since: 04/24/2015

403 Reputation

1 Guide authored

23 Comments

the phillips head does not work, there is some specialty screw head in there. My unit only has one screw, not two. I am stuck and cannot dissassemble this pos.

Fred - Reply

Can I drill the screw hole bigger so that I can use my drill to try different drill bits to get this taken apart? I dan't return it because of the model change. I hate products like this that are a good idea with lousy execution.

Fred - Reply

Hi Fred. Sounds your model, with one screw, is designed different than the one I repaired. At this point, if I were you I'd go for it as it's garbage otherwise. Also, if your model is different than the one I've provided instructions for you may find they don't exactly work once you've cracked it open .... but the idea/design/function might be the similar? And yeah I agree ... good idea lousy execution (that way we'll have to buy more mops?) .... too bad. Good luck Fred.

Leonard -

Thank you for getting back to me - I really appreciate your follow through! Fred

Fred - Reply

Worked like a charm! Thank you so much!!

iwannabnvegas - Reply

awesome! Mine is still working fine, no problems.

Leonard -

I‘m so thankful for this fix post, it works great now. I love my rubbermaid reveal mop.

Susie Henline - Reply

another mop saved from the garbage! still working fine at this end. Glad it worked for you Susie.

Leonard -

Worked like a charm, thanks. My model had another screw located under the red cone shaped sleeve that needed to be removed.

rlstraughn - Reply

Mine had that extra screw, too, but I found it by forcing it open. No harm, though! Still repaired, reassembled , and working!

mfhowl -

So happy super ☺ thank you so much it worked I fixed 2 mop..

Afsana Rahman - Reply

awesome Afsana .... reminds me I still have one to fix. The original one (featured here) is still working great.

Leonard -

Just finished fixing my mop, SO grateful that you saved it from the landfill! Thanks for your clear instructions and very helpful pictures. One comment: When making sure the rod that is in the handle is seated properly, also try not to let the rod fall out of the handle. It's a bit of a hassle to get it lined up correctly with the trigger again.

J. Hill - Reply

Removed 4 screws from mine. Removed the right side without dislodging anything. Held pump body in place while operating the spray lever, the plunger moved freely. Disassembled it further by taking all the little valve parts loose from the main body, found no obstructions. Put Vaseline in the pump body and reassembled, still not working. Doesn't seem like the water from the bottle is getting past the little spring valve in the bottle? Anybody have any ideas about that?

slavens001 - Reply

Is the bottle collapsing as you spray? There is a small silicone rubber valve in the cap next to the outlet valve that sometimes gets stuck shut due to dried out detergent. It pops out and can be cleaned with hot water, then popped back on. The main valve has a center post that is pushed in by a corresponding post in the pump body to allow the cleaning solution to flow. Good luck!

Martha Chinery -

Hi slaven001. Also, if you can clean the plastic water feed-line (that takes a 90 degree bend towards the parts repaired in Step 5) as well as the delivery spray line (after the plunger/piston/cylinder) you've eliminated those as possible problems. Stick with it as it is abit fussy and can be frustrating taking it apart a few times to get it right. Good luck :)

Leonard -

Thanks for excellent write up. I have been bothered by this for some time now. I have the 2-screw model. Comparing your solution to mine I'm going to presume our mops have different revision and/or problem.

I didn’t have a Philips long enough to reach both screws. So eventually I sprayed a generous amount of silicon lubricant down the top from the top and bottom of the handle. Waited about 1-2 hours and squeezed the handle a few times to work the lubricant in. This worked surprisingly well and my mop is back in action. No additional tools needed. I chose not to use the standard 10w-d40 as it might hurt the plastic and other materials inside.

Good luck. hope this helps others.

Edward Wagner - Reply

Good idea. I have a model with only one phillips screw and it's really difficult to take apart. Rather than just break it apart, I put silicone down the small hole in the bottle holder using the small straw that comes with the lubricant. Works better than new. Took about 2 minutes to fix. Thanks for the idea!

James B. -

Thanks for your kind words :)

I've noticed that Vidal, Velida (?) ... some other brand in Canada makes a similar product that looks exactly the same as the Rubbermaid ones I have. I know this as we looked for the Rubbermaid recently for mother-in-law and almost bought the look-alike by mistake. I confirmed the screw situation and we bought the Rubbermaid one (Canada) which is identical to the one in this repair.

That said I still have another one to fix!

Leonard -

UPDATE: I repaired another of these recently and all went as outlined above, yeah!

Leonard - Reply

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!! I went through 3 of these before I'm like, "There's gotta be a way to fix it instead of replace it." Your pictures were extremely helpful and your step-by+step was excellent. Mine works like new! THANK YOU!!!

laday2727 - Reply

Hey, thanks for the primer! The unit is actually pretty well thought out, and constructed.

Mine actually had clogged spray nozzle. Just popped the nozzle out, gave it a soak in warm water & put some compressed air to it. Took a while to loosen up, but finally freed it. Saved me $50, what the heck.

I would suggest keeping it loaded with fluid to keep it from clogging.

C Wakula - Reply

I liked my first one so much I bought a bunch of extra bottles and cleaning pads. When the handle broke after a year, I got another one that stopped working after a few months. I didn't want to buy a 3rd one and didn't want to start over with a new product and useless bottles and pads. Thank you so much! Saved time, money, and I feel accomplished.

cindyjedias - Reply

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