Introduction

When replacing your hard drive, you must transfer the Torx screws from the old drive to the new one.

Remove the eight 4 mm Phillips screws securing the lower case to the MacBook.
  • Remove the eight 4 mm Phillips screws securing the lower case to the MacBook.

According to this page http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1651?viewl..., the 8 screws are not identical.

Can anybody tell me where each kind of screw is supposed to go?

Gregoire - Reply

They are all 100% Identical. You were probably looking at a different model, or Apple has entered the wrong information... Hey, It happens...

weeowey weeowey -

The screws on the Late 2009 are identical. The blue lock compound might make tightening some require a little more effort.

svenaustx - Reply

Can I replace it with a SATA 3 cable?

nm - Reply

A1342 macbook does not have the right controller to support sata III

weeowey weeowey -

hi, i just got back from the apple store and they are really keen for me to upgrade to a new laptop since my battery is old and the screen is cracked, so glad i found ifixit i would love to upgrade this puppy! gonna make it a real sleeper! styler hall wrote about sticking 16 gb of ram in his a 1342 ? is this a simply mather of ordering 3 4gb sticks ?aslo i currently have 4 gb and would like to upgrade to 8 ( or indeed 16) does that mean i need to buy all new sticks or can i continue to use the old one and stick a new one next to it ?

thanks again mick van aar, perth western aus.

michelvanaar - Reply

The A1342 will take up to 16 GB of RAM, however, there are only two RAM slots, so use two 8-GB RAM modules. Other World Computing (OWC) is a great reference source for info on exactly which RAM to use with which model; prices are usually much better on EBay though. Add an SSD from OWC and your machine will really scream!

I hope that helps!

gdesbrisay -

The lower case is constructed of rubber-coated aluminum. Do not excessively bend the aluminum during removal, as any permanent deformation will cause tolerance issues after reassembly. Slightly lift the lower case near the vent opening. Continue running your fingers between the lower and upper cases until the upper case pops off its retaining clips.
  • The lower case is constructed of rubber-coated aluminum. Do not excessively bend the aluminum during removal, as any permanent deformation will cause tolerance issues after reassembly.

  • Slightly lift the lower case near the vent opening.

  • Continue running your fingers between the lower and upper cases until the upper case pops off its retaining clips.

  • The location of these three clips is shown in the third picture.

Do the retaining clips have to be re-engaged when replacing the lower case?

John Morley - Reply

Answering my own question, the clips re-engage when the lower case is correctly positioned. You can help them by gently pressing the lower case with your thumbs midway along the two short sides. When everything is correctly aligned the eight screw holes line up.

John Morley -

For precautionary purposes, we advise that you disconnect the battery connector from the logic board to avoid any electrical discharge. This step is optional and is not required.
  • For precautionary purposes, we advise that you disconnect the battery connector from the logic board to avoid any electrical discharge. This step is optional and is not required.

  • Use the flat end of a spudger to lift the battery connector up out of its socket on the logic board.

  • It may be easier to use your fingernails to lift up on both sides of the connector.

you do not need to remove the battery when replacing the hard drive or ram

brilldoctor - Reply

beware not to lift the connector to close of the angle, as the picture suggest it. It might broke the angle. Attack by the middle.

naamol - Reply

Not necessary?

hikkymemo - Reply

Be careful of the corner of the battery cable connector when trying to pry it off with the spudge. I knocked the corner of mine. No operational impact but was not very pleasing!

jljordanweb - Reply

Not necessary, but a good idea, so as to avoid any spurious charges going through the boards...

svenaustx - Reply

@Svenaustx - What could happen if not removing this battery? Worst case? Not a geek on this but did change RAM on my Macbook Pro "15. Can't remember disconneting the battery back then. Shouldn't it be sufficient shutting the Mac off and ensure it has been used for an hour or so before replacing RAM?

Allan Clarke -

Deck the Halls
With tools and Fix Kits
Remove two 11 mm Phillips screws securing the hard drive bracket to the upper case.
  • Remove two 11 mm Phillips screws securing the hard drive bracket to the upper case.

  • These screws are captive in the hard drive bracket.

Which screwdriver do I need for this? I can't seem to get them moving with the Philips one I used for removing the case of my Macbook.

xyasjah - Reply

You´ll need a Phillips 00 and a Torx T6 Screwdriver

nm -

Lift the retaining bracket out of the upper case.
  • Lift the retaining bracket out of the upper case.

  • When putting the bracket back after replacing the drive, it is easy to put in backwards. If it doesn't seat smoothly, then reverse it and try again.

Add Comment

Lift the hard drive by its pull tab and pull it away from the upper case, minding the cable still attaching it to the logic board. In some revisions of the MacBook A1342, the hard drive bracket may include two rubber brackets (as highlighted in the second picture.) The correct orientation of the rubber brackets is shown in the third picture. In some revisions of the MacBook A1342, the hard drive bracket may include two rubber brackets (as highlighted in the second picture.) The correct orientation of the rubber brackets is shown in the third picture.
  • Lift the hard drive by its pull tab and pull it away from the upper case, minding the cable still attaching it to the logic board.

  • In some revisions of the MacBook A1342, the hard drive bracket may include two rubber brackets (as highlighted in the second picture.) The correct orientation of the rubber brackets is shown in the third picture.

Add Comment

Remove the hard drive cable by pulling its connector straight away from the hard drive. Remove the hard drive cable by pulling its connector straight away from the hard drive.
  • Remove the hard drive cable by pulling its connector straight away from the hard drive.

Add Comment

Remove the two T6 Torx screws from each side of the hard drive (four screws total).
  • Remove the two T6 Torx screws from each side of the hard drive (four screws total).

  • You'll need to transfer these screws to your new hard drive if you're changing drives.

  • If you are installing a new hard drive, we have an OS X install guide to get you up and running.

If you don't have a T6 Torx screwdriver, you can use snub nose pliers to unscrew them by clamping on the screws and turning them out.

Mehron Kugler - Reply

Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

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18 Comments

awesome guide! This really made it so easy to figure out exactly what I was doing. The large, sharp pictures really made me feel confident that I was doing everything properly. Thanks!

dcmcnyy - Reply

can i install an ssd instead of a normal hd?

brian ramdhan - Reply

Yes, absolutely. I switched mine out with a Kingston 120GB SSD.

qosmioamit -

can this model A1342 take an SSD with SATA3 instead of SATA2?

Nikhil M - Reply

By the looks of it. The Crucial MX100 is explicitly said to be compatible and has SATA III:

http://www.ramcity.com.au/buy/crucial-mx...

Albert -

I replaced the original 250GB Hitachi hard drive with a 1TB Samsung HN-M101MBB. Everything worked fine, but now the fan is always running. Maybe the temeprature sensor of the hard drive doesn't connect with the computer?

Ralf Steikert - Reply

Excellent guide. I'm a complete n00b when it comes to HD/SSD install so this guide was magic. With the right tools, its just so easy. After also replacing RAM, I'm looking forward to a much more pleasant and productive time with my new old 2010 Macbook :) Thanks, iFixit!

kyteflyer - Reply

Thank you! I was able to easily change the hard drive of my daughter's Macbook. Didn't need the spudger at any point though, which is good as only had makeshift options available for that.

(Wasn't able to update the OS on same drive as it didn't show as an option in OS installation even after trying Erase/Partition steps using the Utility, as mentioned at several places online. But did finally manage to clone from Time Machine backup and then update the OS onto that.)

maighaa - Reply

Can I use/nstall a 7mm thick 2.5-inch SSD (solid state drive)?

Eric Stealth - Reply

Hey I have a 2011 13" that needs a new hard drive , would this work ? Also any other options ? Plz help!!

Juan marin - Reply

Hey I need to know what hard drive I could use for my 2011 MacBook Pro. Also is there other options ? Thanks !!

Juan marin - Reply

No Torx screwdriver? No problem! You can easily remove and replace the Torx screws with some good pliers or vice grips.

Scott Rollans - Reply

I had to use a pair of crimpers to get a good grip on one of my torx screws that was stripped. I'm gonna be investing in a small pair of those adjustable pliers(with the crew thing on one of the handles) for my tinker toolbox.

Sarah Haggerty -

No problem with replacing the drive, but when I rebooted, some keys on the right hand side of the keyboard, including L and the Return key, had stopped working. What could it be?

Vaktmesteren - Reply

I just swapped the original 250 Gb HD with a 275Gb Crucial MX300 2.5-inch SSD on my sister's MacBook and the speed is just amazing !

Thanks a lot for this guide, you saved my sister's mac :)

davbouchard - Reply

The only hiccups i came across was that the Phillips #00 screwdriver didn't really want to fit the 11mm screws in step 4. So i striped one of the screws a little bit. Maybe it requires a different size. Also i wish that there was a link to show the process in reverse but it's easy enough to figure out. Overall the process was painless, the instructions are short and simple and the pictures are an amazing aid. I took it at an easy pace with music playing in the background on my iPhone. So I have just finished installing a Samsung 500gb Solid State Drive (pre loaded with El Capitan) into my little MacBook. She booted right up and now with an upgraded hard drive, a little extra Ram, and a updated OSX, i have just extended the life of my little old Macbook. It's now the perfect travel/school laptop with out having to risk loosing, damaging or getting my new MacBookPro stolen.

smartparts000 - Reply

This was a pretty easy fix. The longest part was waiting for the Time Machine restore to complete. I was worried for a bit tho because I didn't have the original install disks, I bought my MacBook used off of Amazon for pretty cheap. Now that I have a new 1Tb SSD, I'm thinking of boosting my RAM up to 8Gb even though I just installed 4Gb a few months ago from the 1Gb that it came with. I'm so glad that my friend told me about this site!

Sarah Haggerty - Reply

Hi, I switched to a 480 GB OCZ TR150 SSD from the list of spare parts but my MacBook does not recognize the SSD. Back to the original HDD everything works fine. What can I do to get the SSD working?

sweitenberg - Reply

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