Introduction

Many users of the BCG800XL SmartGrinder experience jamming or clogging and a horrible gear-stripping, clacking sort of sound during use at some point. This is usually due to a worn out impeller or -less commonly- a stripped drive gear. This guide will show you how to inspect the and replace the impeller when it is bad.

Please review the Breville Troubleshooting page first to be sure your grinder does indeed need an impeller replacement.

Breville, unfortunately, doesn't sell replacement parts, so this tutorial has been made possible only recently by 3D printer technology. I've designed an improved impeller for the BCG800XL and made it available here: Shapeways Impeller Source

Here's a quick two-minute overview of this replacement part.

This guide is for the BCG800. If you have a BCG600SIL or BCG400SIL then go here instead.

Parts

Video Overview

Unplug your grinder before completing this repair to avoid electric shock. Remove the hopper and take the upper burrs out. Empty out any coffee grounds (An air gun or vacuum helps) and then inspect the impeller blades.
  • Unplug your grinder before completing this repair to avoid electric shock.

  • Remove the hopper and take the upper burrs out. Empty out any coffee grounds (An air gun or vacuum helps) and then inspect the impeller blades.

  • If the impeller can fit through the hole (ie: be removed just by taking out the lower burr) then it definitely needs replacement.

  • A good impeller should not be removable without dis-assembly and the tips of the impeller blades should not be visible.

  • If your impeller is made of stainless steel rather than plastic you likely have a newer model with significant design changes (eg: BCG820). Stainless steel should not wear out and so your problem is elsewhere.

Hi, my stainless steel grinder impeller is not pushing out the grinds either, just wondering if you have any ideas why?

J M - Reply

It could be that the beans are just too dark for this grinder. See Step 21 for example. When roasts are ultra dark, they tend to make a paste that clogs everything and a lot of grinders cannot handle it. If that’s not it, the ShapeWays impeller does do a better job expelling grounds since the blades go all the way to the edge of the cylinder. In that case, you are more or less doing an upgrade rather than a repair. Changing beans is still probably easier.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I modeled and 3D printed this replacement part it several times at the local library. I've made the final design available for printing at www.shapeways.com (See link below). Of course, you can also model your own design if you wish to spend the time. Shapeways BCG800XL Impeller Shop Here's a video with some background on the Shapeways part.
  • I modeled and 3D printed this replacement part it several times at the local library. I've made the final design available for printing at www.shapeways.com (See link below). Of course, you can also model your own design if you wish to spend the time.

  • Shapeways BCG800XL Impeller Shop

  • Here's a video with some background on the Shapeways part.

    • After nearly a year at roughly 3-double shots per day (~54 grams per day) , I did a full teardown to see how the design was holding up. I am very happy with the results, and you can see the full details here.

Add Comment

You'll need either a 10mm socket with ratchet or a 10mm wrench.
  • You'll need either a 10mm socket with ratchet or a 10mm wrench.

  • A #2 Phillips screwdriver with 8 inches of shaft or longer, and preferably with magnetic tip.

    • You can rub a magnet against the tip to temporarily magnetize it.

  • The sandpaper and file are only necessary if the 3D printed impeller isn't a perfect fit.

Where in the heck do I find a screwdriver like that?? I went to Lowe's and all they have are #2 gauge regular screwdrivers and I need a #1 gauge. Plus, is yours magnetically tipped? Did you lose the screws in there once you removed them?

I'm not the handiest person, so I'm having difficulty with those screws in particular.

Thanks!

notetoself7x3 - Reply

Amazon has it. It's a #2 and just needs to be longer than 12 inches. Just touch it to a magnet if you want to magnetize it. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0037G...

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC - Reply

I previously stated based on a rough guess that the minimum screwdriver length was 12 inches. After recent disassembly and measurement, it is clear that 8 inches of length (not including the handle) is actually enough.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC - Reply

Remove the hopper and upper burrs. Use a 10mm socket to remove the nut for the lower burrs.
  • Remove the hopper and upper burrs.

  • Use a 10mm socket to remove the nut for the lower burrs.

    • The nut for the lower burrs is reverse threaded. Rotate clockwise to loosen.

  • Turn the grind-adjustment knob to the finest setting.

    • Remember what order in which the washers were removed for proper reassembly.

Add Comment

Unwrap the power cord and remove the 4 screws from the base. Remove the four rubber pads
  • Unwrap the power cord and remove the 4 screws from the base.

  • Remove the four rubber pads

  • Slide the power cord through the hole in the base while lifting the base away from the grinder.

Add Comment

Use the long Phillips #2 driver to remove the 4 screws holding the top in place. Flip the grinder over and slowly lift away the top.
  • Use the long Phillips #2 driver to remove the 4 screws holding the top in place.

  • Flip the grinder over and slowly lift away the top.

    • The top is still attached to a wire so the lid will hang off to the side.

Add Comment

Remove the two screws from the top of the display. Lift the display up and out of the frame.
  • Remove the two screws from the top of the display.

  • Lift the display up and out of the frame.

Add Comment

Be sure the grind knob is turned to the finest setting. It's critical that the alignment be preserved when removing the gear assembly.  The small gear in the picture is an encoder. Its purpose is to track the position of the grind adjustment level so it can be displayed on the digital readout. If it gets out of alignment the display will end up reading wrong.
  • Be sure the grind knob is turned to the finest setting.

    • It's critical that the alignment be preserved when removing the gear assembly. The small gear in the picture is an encoder. Its purpose is to track the position of the grind adjustment level so it can be displayed on the digital readout. If it gets out of alignment the display will end up reading wrong.

  • Use a permanent marker to make alignment marks on the three parts of the gear assembly. The marks should line up during reassembly.

  • There are 4 plastic tabs radially holding the big white gear assembly in place. I used both hands, placing my finger tips under each side of the big gear and pulled straight up to remove it.

  • If pulling straight up isn't working, try curling your fingers under just one side of the white gear, and prying upwards until that side pops free a little. Then do the other side.

Really frustrated. Had to go buy a 12 inch philips screwdriver to get this far but the white wheel will not budge with considerable upward pressure - feels like something else needs to be loosened.

Ed Nardell - Reply

The white gear as well as the grey plastic cylindrical part inside of it, come off as a single piece. If pulling straight up isn't working, try curling your fingers under just one side of the white gear, and prying upwards until that side pops free a little. Then do the other side. On the BCG800XL it is held on by 4 grey plastic snaps, placed radially every 90 degrees. Here's an example of the type of snap joint: https://patentimages.storage.googleapis....

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC - Reply

Help! What to do if alignment gets off? Have marked spots as shown, the gear assembly on/off in correct spot, but when putting back together only get a small option of grind choice. The grind dial on right has no stopping point to make sure in fine grind position when apart. Missing some component here now.

Diane - Reply

Hi Diane, watch the video here: https://youtu.be/1lL8BInrki8?t=15m41s It sounds like the screws on your large gear ended up south of the 'plastic stop' referred to in the video. Watch this part too, to get a feel for how the mechanism works: https://youtu.be/1lL8BInrki8?t=10m15s The pics in Step #12 further down also illustrates this better.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Black Friday
Broken doesn't stand a chance.
Lift out the old impeller making sure the steel washer underneath the impeller doesn't fall out. Discard the fibrous felt washer below the metal washer. This is no longer needed as the new impeller design hugs the bushing pedestal more closely and does a good enough job keeping grounds away from the bushing anyway. Optional Modding Tip: Replace the metal washer with a washer that's about 0.1 to 0.2 mm thicker if you'd like your grinder to grind even finer than it did before.
  • Lift out the old impeller making sure the steel washer underneath the impeller doesn't fall out.

  • Discard the fibrous felt washer below the metal washer. This is no longer needed as the new impeller design hugs the bushing pedestal more closely and does a good enough job keeping grounds away from the bushing anyway.

    • Optional Modding Tip: Replace the metal washer with a washer that's about 0.1 to 0.2 mm thicker if you'd like your grinder to grind even finer than it did before.

Add Comment

While it's accessible, use compressed air or toothpick to clean out the exit chute so it's free of any compacted coffee. Give your new replacement impeller a quick rinse and pat down with a towel to prevent static charge during first grinding.
  • While it's accessible, use compressed air or toothpick to clean out the exit chute so it's free of any compacted coffee.

  • Give your new replacement impeller a quick rinse and pat down with a towel to prevent static charge during first grinding.

Add Comment

It is important for the 3D printed part to fit properly. Tolerances of the design error on the tight side. Check that the burr drive pegs fit the holes of the conical burrs.  If it’s too tight, apply a small amount of sanding to the impeller and you’ll be in good shape.
  • It is important for the 3D printed part to fit properly. Tolerances of the design error on the tight side.

  • Check that the burr drive pegs fit the holes of the conical burrs. If it’s too tight, apply a small amount of sanding to the impeller and you’ll be in good shape.

  • Do not sand the flat part of the center hole. Only sand the curved part slightly if needed. The flat part takes the most stress from the drive shaft.

  • The gap here should be small with the new part. If it's too tight, you can sand the edges slightly.

  • Here's a video of the fit-up with the Shapeways printed part.

Add Comment

Before reassembly, check that the conical lower burr and impeller fit well onto the driveshaft with the steel washer underneath. The lip on the drive shaft should be within about 0.5mm of the top surface of the conical burr. When the nut is tightened it will squish to about flush.
  • Before reassembly, check that the conical lower burr and impeller fit well onto the driveshaft with the steel washer underneath. The lip on the drive shaft should be within about 0.5mm of the top surface of the conical burr. When the nut is tightened it will squish to about flush.

  • The lip on the drive shaft should be within about 0.5mm of the top surface of the conical burr. When the nut is tightened it will squish to about flush.

  • If the burr is too high above the lip on the shaft (higher than in the pic), try putting the nut+washer on, tightening hard, and then taking it back off.

  • If the lower burr is still sitting too high on the shaft, take a quick detour to Step 20 and then come back.

Add Comment

With the following pieces aligned carefully set the gear assembly into place: Avoid rotating these pieces to maintain alignment.
  • With the following pieces aligned carefully set the gear assembly into place:

    • Avoid rotating these pieces to maintain alignment.

    • As you set the assembly into place, make sure the two stop-screws are on the left side of the black plastic stop.

    • Align the large peg with the wide slot.

    • Align and the small peg with the small slot.

  • Press down on the gear assembly to snap it into place.

  • Once in place, rotate the coarseness knob through the full range to make sure it's all working.

  • Watch the reinstallation video here for clarification.

Add Comment

Advanced Modding Tip: If you want greater grind-control range, you can back out the two screws in the big gear in the photo. You will then be able to adjust the grind much beyond the normal range. Caveats: Go too fine and the grounds become like paste and it will certainly jam. Also, you must not adjust too fine or the burrs will hit!
  • Advanced Modding Tip: If you want greater grind-control range, you can back out the two screws in the big gear in the photo. You will then be able to adjust the grind much beyond the normal range. Caveats: Go too fine and the grounds become like paste and it will certainly jam. Also, you must not adjust too fine or the burrs will hit!

  • Note: The encoder driven by the little gear also has a hard stop built into it. You will still run into this stop if you keep turning the adjustment knob.

  • DISCLAIMER: This step is completely optional. It is up to you and ultimately your responsibility if you choose to do it. Understand the risks of jamming and burrs hitting. Also be aware of the possibility that others may use your grinder and need to be informed of the modification. You do this unnecessary and optional step at your own risk.

Add Comment

Place the display back into the frame and screw in the two screws that hold it in place.
  • Place the display back into the frame and screw in the two screws that hold it in place.

  • Put the conical burr in place making sure it sets on the pegs of the impeller properly.

  • Place the washers on while maintaining their original order.

  • Tighten the reverse threaded 10mm nut.

    • Tighten the nut as hard as you can. The impeller, being plastic, has a small amount of springiness to it and must be squashed hard so that the height of the lower burr does not vary. If you find that the burrs are too close after you're all done, then this is the reason. Tighten until the motor begins to move, and then give it an extra wack.

  • Check the grind knob to be sure it has full range of motion.

Add Comment

Put the plastic top back on. Flip the grinder over and use the long Phillips #2 screwdriver to reinstall the 4 screws that hold the top in place.
  • Put the plastic top back on.

  • Flip the grinder over and use the long Phillips #2 screwdriver to reinstall the 4 screws that hold the top in place.

  • If the screwdriver is not already magnetized, it'll be worth rubbing a magnet on it to do so prior to this step.

Add Comment

Put the four rubber feet back in place.
  • Put the four rubber feet back in place.

  • Screw back in the four base screws.

  • Re-wrap the cord.

Add Comment

Put the upper burr back on and reinstall the hopper (without coffee beans yet). Run the (empty) grinder briefly to make sure it all sounds OK. Try both coarse and fine grind settings. If all sounds well, add some coffee to the hopper. Dial in the grind and try it out! If something seems off, see the troubleshooting steps below or refer to the troubleshooting page here.
  • Put the upper burr back on and reinstall the hopper (without coffee beans yet).

  • Run the (empty) grinder briefly to make sure it all sounds OK. Try both coarse and fine grind settings.

  • If all sounds well, add some coffee to the hopper. Dial in the grind and try it out! If something seems off, see the troubleshooting steps below or refer to the troubleshooting page here.

  • Congrats on using 3D printing to repair something! Enjoy your coffee! Godspeed! Deus tecum.

  • If you thought this guide was thorough, you should see our primary work. SteadyMouse LLC helps folks with Parkinson's disease use their mouse again. Come check us out anytime at https://www.steadymouse.com and perhaps help us spread awareness. Cheers!

Add Comment

If you encounter ground coffee escaping the chute and getting on the counter, it may mean your coffee is too dry, humidity is too low (static charge), or even that the grinder chute is too clean.
  • If you encounter ground coffee escaping the chute and getting on the counter, it may mean your coffee is too dry, humidity is too low (static charge), or even that the grinder chute is too clean.

  • To fix this, try placing a tiny dab of cooking oil on your finger and rubbing it high up inside of the coffee chute. This will allow a fine layer of grounds to coat the walls of the chute.

  • The added friction of the grounds on the wall of the chute should slow the velocity of the grounds down enough that the overspray stops.

  • FYI: This whole step happens naturally with oily coffee beans, but takes a little longer than with the vegetable oil trick.

I am afraid I have the static electricity problem as the oil trick did not help much. The ground coffee not only speeds up, but it goes up in the air and sticks to the machine (on the metal piece around the chute) and spills around the grinder pretty bad. The former impeller has never suffered the static problem. Could it be that the metal insert inside the original part sort of "grounds" the impeller to the machine? Honestly this is a major drawback as cleaning the countertop every time is annoying, to say the least. I use fresh roasted beans from a coffee shop so I doubt the beans are the problem. The problem seems to worsen over the grinding, at first the ground coffee will drop in the portafilter all right, but the more you grind the more static appears to be generated and the spraying starts, to get worst at the end. Too bad cause the whole process (apart from Breville putting screws in a deep and cavernous cave) was very straightforward and I was very excited to fix a product with a printed part.

vincent blouin demers - Reply

Hi Vincent! Interesting. I can vouch that the problem can be fixed. Usually the oil does the trick, however there may be some factor that isn't understood yet. I roast my own beans, and when I first installed the ShapeWays impeller static was indeed a problem. Then, after a few days of use, the problem went away and never returned. This, along with some feedback from others, led to the oil trick discovery which seems to have helped most folks. There must be some other factor in your case. If it keeps up, or if you find any other "knobs to turn" in your experimenting, report back and I'm happy to investigate further down the rabbit hole with you. Perhaps it's something like a rather dry roast in combination with low humidity weather.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Maybe as the impeller itself gets coated with coffee bean oils it stops generating as much static charge. I'm curious, if you grind some really oily beans, does the problem go away? Then, does it stay gone when returning to dry beans? Might be a good experiment.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC - Reply

Thanks for getting back to me. I did add oil deep in the hole, it seemed to diminish the problem but did not stop it. I could try oilier beans, I usually drink black / heavily roasted beans and this could be an explanation. I'll let you know if the problem solves itself along the way, I'll give the fix time to set in :-).

vincent blouin demers - Reply

Tried a few different beans with no success. I added more oil in despair, it clogged and the keyway on the impeller stripped. Grinder is useless again after MUCH trouble. Too bad I was super stocked I could fix it. Apparently the metal insert in the original impeller was no decoration...

vincent blouin demers - Reply

I'm bummed too Vincent. I was rooting for you and I'm really sorry to hear that the issue didn't resolve. This is the first I've learned of an impeller keyway failing too. I wonder if too much oil, rather than just a fine coating, made the grounds clump together into a paste causing significant resistance. I would expect it to take significant back pressure to damage the keyway. :-(

-

NOTE to any others: Hindsight is 20/20 they say, but future users should stick to just oiling the chute and not the chamber. The oil in the chute fixes overspray well, but static electricity it seems is still a mystery. It makes sense why the plastic of the impeller, rubbing against coffee grounds could generate a charge. What is unclear, is why it only affects some units and what change results in it going away. If anyone finds a fix, please post to let us know.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

By the way Vincent, if you are open to trying again, the next impeller is "on the house" courtesy of SteadyMouse, LLC. Send me an email at coffeegrinderhelp[at]steadymouse[dot]com if you are interested.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I just switched out my impeller today for the shape ways one, and immediately got this problem, going to try the oil trick, luckily for me I have some old bad beans I can afford to just run through the grinder but I want to make sure I do the right thing when I try and fix. When you say oil the chute that just means the part where they grinds are actually falling out of the grinder, not the passage that the impeller pushes the grounds through, right?

garretta4987 - Reply

Yes, we've learned through some unfortunate trial and error (See above) not to oil the chamber with the impeller. Let that part get coated by coffee naturally. A small dab of oil applied to the chute where the grinds fall out is all that is necessary to stop overspray. Static charge is a separate issue still being investigated.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I am also experiencing the static issue. Applying oil helped for about half of the first grind with it applied. I would be very interested in any new findings, as I've been dealing with this for months.

Beau Bush - Reply

It's still not well understood. There must be some variables that make the problem appear only for some. Jump over to the old Amazon reviews of the BCG800XL at this link here and search 'static':

https://www.amazon.com/Breville-BCG800XL...

You will see many comments mentioning static charge. Some folks comment that there's hardly any. Others comment that there's way too much, especially when grinding into the plastic cup. In light of this, I think there are multiple factors at play, and some are intrinsic to Breville's design. The impeller may influence static levels, however it's only part of the equation. Steps 22 and 23 of the ifixit article offer a few more ideas to try.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

My own grinder with the impeller, has hardly any static cling at all and grinds into the portafilter well.

This is an espresso grind nearly every time and I roast my own stuff to a medium level. One day though I tried a very very dark oily roast (Starbucks Columbia IIRC) and the static cling problem did happen! It was so bad that grounds stuck to the outside of the unit. That seems like a strong clue, although I still don't understand it well. So, in Step 19 I recommend a film of oil on the chute to reduce centrifugal momentum, and yet in Step 23 I recommend not using oily ultra dark roasts.

Lastly, grinding into the plastic cup seems to have static issues for everyone. I recommend switching to a glass or metal cup for coarser grinds.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

TOO CLOSE (ie: grinding too fine): If the burrs are too close, or even touching (but centered), the nut on the lower burr may not be tight enough. With the ratchet and 10mm socket, give it a quick counter-clockwise jerk. If that fails, recheck your fit-up against the second photo to make sure the lower conical burr is the proper height. If it's clear that the lower burr is sitting too high on the impeller, see the 3rd picture and sand the area highlighted in RED. While doing this, periodically install and re-check the lower burr height until it matches photo #2. Careful not to sand off too much as it's easy to remove thickness but hard to add it back. TOO FAR: If the burrs are too far apart such that the grind isn't fine enough, it could be that the steel washer underneath the impeller got left out. See step #9. Additionally, you can try removing *one* of the two washers above the lower burr and not tightening the nut as much. There's also a shim kit offered by Breville if you contact them.
  • TOO CLOSE (ie: grinding too fine): If the burrs are too close, or even touching (but centered), the nut on the lower burr may not be tight enough. With the ratchet and 10mm socket, give it a quick counter-clockwise jerk. If that fails, recheck your fit-up against the second photo to make sure the lower conical burr is the proper height.

  • If it's clear that the lower burr is sitting too high on the impeller, see the 3rd picture and sand the area highlighted in RED. While doing this, periodically install and re-check the lower burr height until it matches photo #2. Careful not to sand off too much as it's easy to remove thickness but hard to add it back.

  • TOO FAR: If the burrs are too far apart such that the grind isn't fine enough, it could be that the steel washer underneath the impeller got left out. See step #9. Additionally, you can try removing *one* of the two washers above the lower burr and not tightening the nut as much. There's also a shim kit offered by Breville if you contact them.

  • Lastly, both of the above issues can happen if the alignment in "Step 12" got shifted. If so, you may need to pop-off and adjust the rotation of the upper-burr holder assembly. This is tricky, but doable. I suggest marking the existing alignment with permanent marker before experimenting.

Add Comment

If it sounds horrible when running (even without coffee beans) like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcQcbHIP... then it's probably either a damaged torque limiter or a stripped drive gear. FYI: The situation in the video was the aftermath of a rock getting jammed in the burrs.
  • If it sounds horrible when running (even without coffee beans) like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcQcbHIP... then it's probably either a damaged torque limiter or a stripped drive gear. FYI: The situation in the video was the aftermath of a rock getting jammed in the burrs.

  • I don't cover tear down all the way to the gear box. Step #9 is as close as I go. In the photo though there are 4 washer screws and 2 screws on the encoder. If you remove those you'll be well on your way to investigating the gear box.

  • The options to fix either of these are not as well explored, so if there is damage here and you fix it successfully, post a comment below. FYI: Breville has a repair service for about $90 and that may still be the best option in this situation.

  • The torque limiter may be "fixable" by stretching each of the radially-distributed springs about 2mm each. This should increase the torque at which it slips.

  • The drive gear on the right has a potential source found by a user below (Thanks Dave Gordon!): http://www.forumappliances.com/breville-... This is not yet verified to work, but the price is reasonable, so if you try it out and it works, post below so we can know!

Just bumbled my way through this repair including the forumappliances replacemnt gear, and a video would help a great deal. Removing the whole motor assembly is challenging as the wires are short and permanently connected. Patience and a steady hand are needed. A guide to reassembling the torque release gear would have helped a lot. But once you swap out the damaged gear and reassemble everything, it works like new. Hope it lasts long enough to save up for a Mazzer.

Harris Kirshenbaum - Reply

Nice work! Yes, I consider changing out the gear to be "hard mode". The replacement gear is unfortunately so hard to come by, and not robust when 3D printed, that I haven't attempted a write-up yet. Glad you got everything back in ship-shape however, and can enjoy your coffee!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

wow. so I am in to Shapeways for $28 for the new impeller, and $15 for a monster long screwdriver. the impeller was in rough shape and would have needed to be replaced. that is all good now. However the nasty sound is still there. Thinking a rock (and I know there was one at one point) was the culprit. I am assuming that a gear is stripped. Please help if you can! You can DM me at jaynalbach@gmail.com I can’t imagine paying Breville anything after all this time and investment, so i gotta finish this up. caffeine deprived! cheers Jay

Jay Nalbach - Reply

Oh no, not the gear-box too! That’s terrible luck. Well, two paths: You can either cut your losses and request a refund from ShapeWays or tear down to the gearbox if you are a brave soul. If the gear is stripped, the forumappliances link above sometimes has it in stock. If the gears are good, you can likely just tighten the nut hard on the torque limiter (left side of the pic). I’ll email this to you as well.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

OK. I went in deep. I dismantled the entire gearbox, and found 2 interesting issues. 1) the main drive gear is roached. At least 6-7 of the teeth are mashed /sheared off or flattened. This must have been a result of the rock that got in. It created a sizable flat spot which I am certain is the additional issue. The extra part listed on Forum Appliances just came in stock, so I ordered the part. Hopefully it will be in the mail to me tomorrow and we can look forward to reassembly shortly thereafter. 2) Another thing i thought was interesting, is that one of the tension springs (6 in total in conjunction with 6 ball bearings) was loose in the gear box when I opened it up. I will certainly give it a shot to pull out the springs a bit to add some tension, but that bit will be tricky to re-assemble for sure. Ben, if you’re up for it, I may ask a few questions. I did find a loose washer (very small) which I think goes on the end of the torque limiter, but may need clarity. Cheers Jay

Jay Nalbach -

Sounds like a good plan Jay. I will be here.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Occasionally a user reports statically charged coffee grounds coming out that seems to defy the laws of gravity. They float up into the air and cling to things, making a mess!
  • Occasionally a user reports statically charged coffee grounds coming out that seems to defy the laws of gravity. They float up into the air and cling to things, making a mess!

  • Often it will stop on its own after the impeller gets a few days of use. It's a bit of a mystery however, I believe the issue arises mainly in dry climates, with certain beans in combination with the plastic impeller.

  • To fix the issue, simply give your impeller a scrub and rinse in the sink and then pat it down with a towel until dry.

  • This slight bit of moisture seems to take care of static issues permanently. I suspect it gets us by until the impeller builds up a natural coat of coffee, which also serves to prevent static charge.

I have the static problem big time. It would have been helpful to go into this more in the main assembly instructions. Even though I washed the new impeller with water (not soap, since that wasn't mentioned) and dried as suggested, I'm still getting a LOT of static and the grounds are flying everywhere. If it had mentioned washing well with soap, I would have done it. I am not in the mood to take it apart now and wash, so I'll just have to wait awhile and see if it fixes itself. I live in southern California, and am using a Trader Joe's French Roast, so maybe that is the problem.

Phil Blum - Reply

Water should be enough. The other possibility is it's the roast. Is it really dark/oily? I do my own roasting and never have a problem with those beans. Just this last month though, I didn't have time and used a charcoal dark starbucks roast I had gotten as a gift. The stuff ground all clumpy and was getting everywhere. There's definitely some mystery going on with certain beans. Troubleshooting #5 is my best attempt to help folks there (based on the starbucks experience), however there's plenty of room for discovery yet.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Some beans, especially the "roasted so dark it's nearly charcoal" variety can be way too oily. The characteristic is that rather than grind to a powder it turns to "paste" in the lower chamber. This is obviously bad, because it then comes out in clumps or not at all.
  • Some beans, especially the "roasted so dark it's nearly charcoal" variety can be way too oily. The characteristic is that rather than grind to a powder it turns to "paste" in the lower chamber. This is obviously bad, because it then comes out in clumps or not at all.

  • Clumpy grounds, for some reason tend to overshoot the portafilter and make a mess. I suspect this is because the large clump size has more mass, and comes out of the chute with too much momentum.

  • If you pull the upper burr, and see what looks like a nice smooth black surface where the impeller would normally be, then that's your sign.

  • The Fix: Clean the lower chamber, or at least break up the cake of grounds, and switch to a less oily roast.

Add Comment

Conclusion

The steps should have taken you all the way through re-assembly. Provided that impeller wear was your issue, everything will work again. If you have other issues see the troubleshooting steps or post below for further help.

33 other people completed this guide.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC

Member since: 05/15/2016

1,182 Reputation

2 Guides authored

134 Comments

Excellent repair guide! Thank you for sharing the process and design. Cheers

joepompa - Reply

Thanks Joe! I had a lot of fun making it. Cheers to you too.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

hi! thank you so much for this guide! I purchased the 3d printed impeller from shape ways and it fit beautifully! I'm still having issues with the grinder though- it will now grind through once at whatever volume I have it set at, but then when you try to grind again, it makes a high pitched sound similar to the one it makes when out of beans. If you disassemble and reassemble the burrs, it will do the same thing again- grind through one cycle then stop. Any ideas???

Patrick Newton - Reply

Hi Patrick,

I wonder if there is a problem with the hopper. When you remove the hopper after the problem you're seeing happens, there should be at least a tablespoon worth of beans on top of the burrs waiting to be ground. If this is not the case, then I suspect it's the hopper not letting beans get through. You can test your hopper by holding it over a bowl and twisting the locking/unlocking knob. The beans within should flow through freely into the bowl. If this is OK, then next, perhaps make sure it's locking into place properly on the grinder. Something could be getting in the way of the locking mechanism.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Any chance you could share the STL file on Thingiverse.com or something similar? I've got my own 3D printer and would love to give this a whirl.

Lucas - Reply

Sorry friend. I haven't even made back enough to cover the CPA that I'm gonna have to hire just to help me navigate the maze of tax implications from selling an item on shapeways. I'll consider it after I break even OK.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Hi Ben, do you have any idea if this impeller would fit BCG800 model?

Thank you,

Yulia

Yulia D - Reply

Hi Yulia,

I'm pretty sure BCG800 and BCG800XL are the same thing. In my googling, I'm unable to find a difference. FYI: If it looks like the first pic in step #1 above then it's almost certainly going to fit.

Take care,

--Ben

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I have the same problem with the grinder in my Barista Express. We complained and had a brand new machine... same problem. With som beans it goes nuts. Do you think I could use the same part in the grinder on the Barista Express?

fengstroem - Reply

This may take some investigating. Breville does sometimes use the same parts in different models. If you remove the upper and lower burrs, does the impeller look just like the one in the pic in Step #9 above? The hole for the shaft should be 10mm by 8mm diameter and the entire impeller should be between 38mm and 44mm across from edge to edge depending on wear. If all that matches up, there's a high probability it's the same.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

First of all, thanks to Ben for this amazing DIY solution. Truly inspirational. I am going to try this out on the grinder in my Barista Express BES860XL. I suspect the part will fit with minor modifications based on the pictures above and my measurements (41.4mm, 45mm opening), so I ordered it from Shapeways. One difference is that the impeller shaft hole on the BES860XL part is full-round 10mm diameter, not slotted, so I will have to drill out the hole. Grinder disassembly is slightly different on the BES860XL than above. For example, there is no acorn nut attaching the conical burr to the impeller shaft from the top; it appears to be threaded on. Thus the only way to remove the impeller is to take off the torque limiter (yes, Ben was right about that; see picture in step 21). You'll need to grab the conical burr with a vise grip, lined with something grippy but softer than the steel burr, and be careful not to lose the ball bearings and springs in the slip clutch :) I'll let you know if it all works out.

ybergner -

Stuff like this makes my day. Good luck sir!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Update: part arrived today. In short: it is working in the BES860XL!! Full story: Surface was rougher than I expected, having opted for polishing, but I really have no idea how rough it would have been.... I knew that I would be drilling out the shaft hole, which I did, but I also checked for other compatibility issues with the BES860XL. Comparing the underside of the new impeller to the old one, I noticed that the inner diameters (where the fibrous felt washer sits) were different--my original was 24.7mm--but I didn't think this would matter since I did not need to re-use the felt washer. Overall fit inside the grinder well was a bit tight, as promised, so I filed it down to spin free. That's all it took; I reassembled the grinder. Ta-dah! Deliciousness restored. (One thing, maybe this will pass, is that the grinds definitely have more electrostatic charge upon exit. You can see them spread/stick in the container. I wonder if this is related to the type of plastic or just the tighter tolerances/rubbing.)

ybergner -

You did it! That's really cool that it works in the BES860. This will help a few others, I'm sure. For the static charge issue, try "Step 19 - Troubleshooting Overspray" up above. It's a 3 minute fix on the BCG800XL. Perhaps it will work for you too. Thanks for posting all the cool details! Have a good one!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thanks so much for this guide, you saved my BCG800!!! I installed my new 3d printed impeller at the weekend and my grinder is now doing what it should...grinding beans! The guide was really easy to follow. The one thing I'm not totally happy with is the fineness of the grind. Rather than following your advanced modding tip I have have ordered shims from Breville who send these out for free (I'm in Australia not sure if they ship them elsewhere). Thanks again, this has really opened up my eyes to 3D printing, nothing like having something in your hands to appreciate it, cheers.

Martin Wurt - Reply

Hi Martin,

Your note made my evening! Glad I could help. The shim kit sounds like a good option, especially if it's free. I think these grinders are capable of going very fine when folks put in that little extra tuning effort! Enjoy your coffee and welcome to the world of 3D printing!

Cheers,

--Ben

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I installed the printed impeller and it fit well. My grinder was still making the loud ratcheting noise and would stop grinding (and just spin) with any beans with the new impeller. It was pretty obvious from its behavior that the torque limiter was at fault. Since I was in this deep and it's a thrift store grinder I decided to dive in - there's a torque limiter in the gearbox that consists of springs and ball bearings under one of the gears (the final driven gear). The main gear was in perfect shape. Eliminating the torque limiter means either epoxying a small metal plate to the nylon gear or, plan B, using some pins. There is insufficient clearance to screw or bolt them together. I'm working on the pin option since bonding nylon to metal is difficult. Like Ben said if you remove the torque limiter its safety function is no longer there. I think removing it is achievable, will post when I have a solution. Thanks to Ben for getting us all this far, it's a great impeller.

Joseph Ek - Reply

Best of luck Joseph. There's another lady who got stuck here also (She contributed the video in the "Troubleshooting #3" step). Whatever you find may help her too. If you figure it out, I'm happy to integrate it into the guide. Thanks for going further down the rabbit hole for us.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I received your impeller and attempted install today. Couldn't get past step 6 b/c I don't have a long enough phillips screwdriver. Actually, I have several that are long enough but not thin enough to fit in the hole. I even tried my precision tool set and they were too large for the hole. Where do you recommend getting one? Lowes and Ace locally didn't have anything close.

rsj1022 - Reply

Wow, I would have thought Ace would have something. Any Phillips #2 screwdriver longer than 12 inches is fine. Amazon has one here if you don't mind the extra wait: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0037G...

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

That screwdriver is huge. My suggestion is to go for something a bit less long, like this 12 incher: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B012T3...

Jan van Rensburg -

FYI, after recent disassembly and direct measurement, it is clear that 8 inches of shaft length on the Phillips #2 screwdriver is actually enough. This should be easier to find than 12".

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

i had to search and search for the right screwdriver. In the end, I bought a WIHA SoftFinish® Phillips Driver #1 x 300mm and it does the trick! not cheap by any means, but I am sure i will find other uses for this beauty. Their site is under construction, but the shop is called W.C Winks Hardware, in Portland Oregon. Its one of the sexiest tool shops I’ve ever been to. Now to get this damned grinder to start working again! Looks like I have a gearbox problem.

Jay Nalbach -

I've been to Ace, Home Depot and Lowes and no luck. They have precision kits but way too short. My issue was not only the length, but also the diameter. A regular screw driver shaft wouldn't fit even if long enough. It has to be long with a very small diameter like a precision tool. Weird. I thought for sure I would see other comments here from people having the same issue but guess it is just me. The tool you noted on Amazon was the one I nearly purchased yesterday so I will give it a try. My grinder will put out a courser grind, just has trouble as I move towards the finer grinds so I can wait on the tool via mail. Thanks for your help and for making the replacement impeller to begin with. Much appreciated.

rsj1022 - Reply

The grind from my Breville BCG800 (not the 800XL) had become inconsistent and clumpy lately - to the point where I couldn't make good espresso any more.

After seeing this page I checked the impeller in my machine. It was clear the impeller had worn away - it's edges were several mm from the side.

I ordered the 3D printed impeller from Shapeways and installed it yesterday.

The 3D printed impeller fitted perfectly. My BCG800 did not have a steel washer underneath the impeller, but did have the fibrous felt washer, which I did not re-install.

When re-assembled, the burr appeared to be seated slightly higher on the spindle, but when tested, it worked perfectly with no apparent change to the grind fineness.

It's now producing even grounds which are not clumpy - so am able to make proper espresso again.

Thank you very much Ben. Your instructions were excellent - and if I get another couple of years useful life out of the machine I'll be very happy.

Your page here is much appreciated.

Mike Manning - Reply

Thanks Mike! I love hearing stories like this. Great to know that the fix works for the BCG800 and the BCG800XL just the same. Others have asked about that and so I'm sure your story will clarify things for others! Enjoy your espresso!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Don't try this on the BCG 820 the impeller doesn't come close and Breville have made it impossible to remove the gear burr hopper assembly without butchering it, $45 and 2 hours of my life gone forever..............sorry!

Peter - Reply

Ugh, that's sad new Peters. Thanks for finding out for the rest of us and I'll add a warning about the BCG820 for others. Sorry you were the unfortunate one to find out for the rest of us. I had high hopes for the 820 myself before this discovery.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I have the model BCG800CBXL “with dosing IQ” that changes the “dose” depending on the grind fineness setting. Recently, with fixed “number of cups” setting and grind fineness, the amount of coffee output by the grinder has been decreasing. I had a few events where the exit chute got clogged and the motor began to race. And then I found this page; thanks for writing it, Ben! I inspected my impeller and sure enough, the blades were worn down away from the edges of the grinding chamber. I ordered the replacement impeller from Shapeways. A long shafted Craftsman #2 Phillips screwdriver worked for reaching the top cover screws. I cleaned the exit chute. I did not reinstall the felt washer and my upper burr sits a wee bit above where it used to on the spindle, but the impeller fit perfectly with no sanding. The grinder runs as expected after reassembly! But I am still having to select a large number of cups on the front panel to get the desired output amount.

Bill - Reply

Hi Bill,

Interesting issue, and a new one for me. Are the beans fairly oily? With dark, oily roasts the grounds sometimes get sticky. A dry, light roast is worth testing just to see if it makes a difference. Additionally, check the burrs for wear. If the upper and lower burrs have touched while grinding, then it would wear them down fast. Lastly, next time it's grinding slow, stop it mid grind, unlock and remove the hopper. Check that there is a decent amount of beans making it to the upper-burr. Tip them out, and then pull the upper burr and inspect the chamber to see if the grounds are sparse or densely packed. Sparse means beans aren't getting ground as fast as the impeller is emptying them. Dense means it's getting backed up / clogged (possibly at the chute). I think this youtube video matches the problem you describe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVOOLuQs...

They don't say what was wrong, however I definitely notice it sounds wrong. It should sound like this: https://youtu.be/k5E1O3hvAOI?t=4m7s

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thanks Ben. Of course I meant to say "lower burr" above. The beans are oily so that could be a factor. I notice that the grounds are getting a lot of static electricity since I replaced the impeller, and I get grounds clinging all the way up the walls of the plastic output container. The grinder sounds normal, unlike the one in the first video link above. I will try checking the burr state and the flow process as you suggest.

Bill -

What can I do if the burr is still sitting too high after tightening the nut and washers? I thought it was close enough but you can hear that the burrs are barely touching on a fine grind after reassembling the BCG800XL.

Rachael Algarin - Reply

Hi Rachael. First try really tightening the nut a bit extra (Snapping your wrist with the ratchet until the motor turns from the torque will really squash everything down). If it already is that tight, the next option is to take the impeller out and sand on the bottom inside cup where it rests on the washer. Keep checking it against pic #2 in step 20 until it sits just like the picture. Alternatively, instead of sanding the impeller, another option is to change out or sand down the washer underneath the impeller. How far off from the picture is it? BTW, If you shoot me a pic at coffeegrinderhelp@steadymouse.com I'm happy to take a look. I'd like to figure out if the issue is from variation in the impeller printing or variation from grinder to grinder. I've seen this one other time so far.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I just sent the pictures to your email address. Sorry for the delay! I finally had time to take it apart again this morning.

Rachael Algarin -

Hi Rachael, Thanks for the photos and detailed info! I've updated Step 11 and Step 20 thanks to your help. It sure does seem like the impeller came out too thick. The new instructions in Step 20 above should get you up and running again. If you discover anything more along the way, I'll be here.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Hi all,

I can add the information that the original part can be purchased from Gastroback (the Gastroback 42639 is identical to the Breville and Sage Smartgrinders). As their representative politely wrote to me: You need the „Fan“ (98312) It costs 1,49€ + freight + VAT.

I forgot check this Ifixit post before reinstallation and simply tapped the impeller gently into place. It was a bit worrying while I did it as I realized that I was close to damaging a much more expensive part of the machine - it did work however..

Cheers Jacob Jacobsen

Jacob Jacobsen - Reply

Hi Bill

A big thanks for the fix instructions and the design. I had the same issue and decided to buy 2 of your impellers as the freight to NZ was the same. Put it in and worked no problems - awesome!

Neal Martin NZ

Neal Martin - Reply

Glad to hear it Neal! Thanks for the note.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Hi Ben, I purchased replacement impeller, fitted great,but still have clacking sound, have had a look doesn't seem to be any stripped gears, has anyone had any luck fixing torque limiter?

Many thanks Danny

Gisborne. New Zealand

Danny Seabrook - Reply

Hi Danny,

No one has reported a successful fix yet, only talked about what they might try. It's good news that your gears are in good shape however, and there are things to try:

I have a new idea if you don't mind experimenting a bit. Take a look at the pic in Step 21 above, specifically the gear on the left. If you take that nut off the gear and pull it apart there are springs and ball bearings around the gear's edge that make up the torque limiter mechanism (Careful not to lose them). I recommend taking each spring and stretching it just a little by hand (Maybe 1 mm or 2 mm longer). Then reassemble the gear/limiter mechanism, and tighten the nut back on extra snug. This should greatly increase the torque required to begin slipping/clacking, while still leaving the safety function in tact. If it works for you, I'll add it to the steps up above. Good luck!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thank you Ben. I was ready to toss our grinder after a short 3 years. Then I stumbled upon your awesome guide! The shape way gear is definitely an improvement as well as your suggestion for the light coating of oil in the exit chute.

Mark Walsh - Reply

Glad you're up and running again Mark!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thanks for the great fixit guide Ben,

unfortunately the rachetting noise in my BCG800XL grinder was due to the plastic worm drive gear (right side of picture in step 21). A few teeth on the outside of the gear are sheared off. I had to take the gears off and inspect them closely to find the damage. Kudos to anyone who has disassembled their grinder to this point, it isn't easy. I'm still a little concerned about getting it back together.

I suspect the problem is that the torque limiter was poorly calibrated and a rock in the beans created enough torque for the thin stainless worm drive shaft to shear the plastic before the torque limiter released - if it ever released. I thought about getting a new gear from the guy selling them on ebay, but expect the same thing would happen again.

I'm currently looking into having the gear made from aluminum or brass, which would prevent shearing and still protect the drive gear. I believe the torque limiter would still protect its own gears.

Dylan Schmeelk - Reply

I'll post the price for the gear and where to order it when I find out. If it is only affordable to have more than one made, I'll ask here if any others are interested in getting one.

Dylan Schmeelk -

Hi Dylan, Nice investigation work and best of luck! That drive gear is the common failure point when folks get a rock jammed in the burrs. Having a metal option for replacing the gear would be really great.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Great fix.

Thanks a bunch.

Peter

Peter Put - Reply

Ben - I purchased a couple of the replacement impellers through the ShapeWays website - I have purchased them for using in a Breville BES860XL espresso machine integrated grinder as someone else commented on here that it worked - as you cant access the impeller from the top with this machine I had to disassemble the torque limiter (as shown in figure 21) to get the worn impeller out - the problem is that my kid somehow messed up all the washers and I dont know what goes back where when I reassemble the torque limiter. Are you able to provide a diagram of what nuts and washers go where when reassembling?

Dave Gordon - Reply

Hi Dave, I've asked another user who is far more knowledgeable on the BES860. Hopefully more to come.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Unfortunately, no info on the washer placement. The user I asked did provide a handful of pics he took during BES860XL teardown though. Perhaps it will help indirectly. See here: https://imgur.com/a/kUf7M

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

For those that are interested - the main drive gears are available at Forum Appliances website for less than $5 each - way less than the price being quoted on eBay.

http://www.forumappliances.com/parts-acc... under part number P-BCG820BSS130

I hope this helps some of you as it is another common fault with Breville products.

Dave Gordon - Reply

That is an awesome find! You just helped a ton of folks out Dave! Everyone's searched high and low for that gear online!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Sorry but this repair guide is anything but a guide. What a complete waste of time and effort. I think its great that you created the part on your own and I'm genuinely happy with the purchase. But I think you should have had other folks try to follow your instructions first prior to posting them. There are many incorrect statements and assumptions made, and the parts recommended are incorrect as well.

redacted - Reply

I'm at a bit of a loss. Over 150 folks have repaired successfully with this guide. Could you email me at coffeegrinderhelp@steadymouse.com? I'd like to understand where you ran into trouble so I can fix it.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

How long will this replacement last. I ask since I don't know anything to these kind of plastic.

Is it the same durability as the original, better, not so good.

john - Reply

Hi John, I've been using mine every day for 6 months now and I make at least 3 double shots of espresso each day (18g of coffee each) . This puts me at a little over 21 lbs of coffee, all fine ground for espresso, since I installed the v4 impeller. Every month or two I use an airgun to clean out the lower chamber and take a look at how it's holding up. On one occasion, 3 months ago, I did a complete disassembly to see in detail. So far the wear is not visibly noticeable. Even the tiny cylinders you can see on the impeller blade tips are not worn off yet. Either the 3D printed nylon is very tough stuff, or perhaps there is less friction because the blade geometry does a better job keeping the lower chamber empty. In short, my own experience has it being way better than the original design. I'll be continuing to keep an eye on it and will post back if I ever get it to fail. So far so good though.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thanks for the great tutorial! I couldn't have opened my grinder without it. Trust me i tried. Unfortunately my main gear is shot. Does anyone know where I can purchase one? Seems like most places are out of stock. I live is the US.

Mike Laney - Reply

There's a guy on ebay selling them, only way overpriced if you ask me. I have an idea though. If you google "custom made gear" there are a bunch of shops out there that offer to make gears for people. Many look like you can send the old gear to them and they handle the details. Not sure the lead time or the cost, however it's worth a shot.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Emailed forum appliances website and they found more in stock. Get them while they last.

Mike Laney -

Nice thinking! Really glad to hear this Mike.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Mike where did you find the gear? I've been looking for a few weeks. I'm not paying $50 for the ebay ones. Thanks!

wrighttw -

This site here: http://www.forumappliances.com/breville-... Looks like they're out of stock again. You may have to contact them like Mike did.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thanks so much for posting this and all of the work to document it.

Tom Maiorana - Reply

Thanks Tom! I enjoy it.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thanks! I just received the part and the installation was easy. Grinder is back to making nice fine grounds.

Larry Gebhardt - Reply

Glad to hear it Larry!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Hi Ben,

My years old Breville Smart Grinder is making this ratcheting noise, more frequently lately and I've noticed that it's mainly when I try to grind my own home roasted beans. These beans may be a little lighter than commercially roasted beans at times. It does not make the noise while free running ie I don't think any gears have been stripped.

After reading your guide, I cleaned the grinder out and removed the top and bottom burrs, then cleaned again so that I could inspect the impeller properly. The ends of the impeller blades were not clearly visible and the impeller would not come out of the chamber.

Can you suggest any other reason for this noise or another fix? If it helps I can send you a jpg pic of the impeller blades. Have you experienced the fault with light roasted beans and maybe I need to roast to a darker bean?

Thanks very much for any suggestions,

Graeme.

Graeme Burke - Reply

Hi Graeme,

Light roasted beans are harder for the grinder. Dark roasts are indeed easier and worth a shot. The clacking sound you hear comes from the torque limiter in the BCG800XL gearbox. It slips to protect the gears whenever the torque is too high between the grinding burrs.

Run with some darker beans to see if it grinds without any issue. If it still clacks, then it's either the torque limiter slipping too easily or the impeller is worn enough that it's a problem.

If the torque limiter is going off too easily, you'll have to open the gearbox and take apart the gear. I don't cover this, but if you're comfortable doing so, you could try stretching the springs in that limiter to make it slip at a higher torque (Mentioned in step 21).

Since your grinder is "years old", I'm leaning towards the impeller still being the likely culprit, even if the edges aren't quite visible yet. The clearer that lower chamber stays, the less likely it is to back-up grinds into the burr mechanism and overload it.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thanks, Ben You are a legend. I'll let you know how I go.

Graeme Burke - Reply

WOW! Amazing source of information! Ben what an incredible job you have done! I own 2 of these grinders - one black & one silver. The black grinder will frequently (ok regularly) quit grinding beans and make a high pitched squealing sound. If I remove the hopper, remove the burrs, clean everything, reassemble everything then it will work...for awhile. I thought the black one had a bent shaft or damaged gear....possibly from a tiny stone mixed in with my beans. But having read your fixit guide I am having 2nd thoughts. OTOH the silver grinder works perfectly EXCEPT that the display fails to show changes in grind size. Yes the grind actually changes - it's just that the bar display doesn't register any changes. I guesstimate where the dial should be. I briefly considered moving the grinding "module" from the silver grinder with the bad display into the black unit with the working display but grinding issues. How difficult would it be to swap the "grinding" hardware from one unit to the other? TIA

reeder1968 - Reply

Interesting. The high pitch squeal is usually a bad sign and worth checking the gearbox for teeth damage. The good news is making one working grinder out of the two should definitely be doable. Swapping the grinding mechanism from the silver one into the black one should work. OTOH, I think fixing the silver one will be easier. The display not updating is probably just the "digital encoder". Take a look at the pic in Step 8. The encoder is driven by the tiny gear and measures grind position for the display. Make sure that tiny gear is engaged to the big one and that no wires are broken off. If the encoder itself has gone bad you could swap it with the good one from the black grinder. BTW, when you rotate the encoder gear by hand, there is a hard stop built in. You'll want to count the turns until it hits the stop so that you can set the replacement encoder to the exact same position. TLDR: Check the gear box (on black) and check the encoder (on silver). Might be possible to fix both. 1 for sure.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Ben...regarding the high pitch squeal....think dentist office. Should make your teeth hurt. Thanks for the heads up on fixing the silver unit. The display works (ie it is not dead) but merely fails to show any 'dialed' grind changes. The 'marker' is stuck on the far left hand side of the scale. Turn the grind dial and the 'marker' dances for a second or two but fails to move. Per your comments I think that first I will get the silver unit to correctly display the grind changes. Then I will attack the black one and check the gear box. Right now the silver one is used for grinding for a drip MoccaMaster (my wife's go to machine) or for an AeroPress (my choice when time is not an issue). Two different grind sizes. I snagged the silver one for $40 from a salvage retailer here in C'bus. The black unit I bought new and I probably damaged the gear box while grinding some home roasted beans. Again, thank you for the wealth of information AND for sharing it! Really appreciate your updated response too.

reeder1968 - Reply

Thank You! I just installed the shapeways impeller (I was hoping to fall within your 10-35 minute window, but missed by a couple minutes-oh well!). The part was great, no sanding or filing needed. My old impeller was completely shot after 3 years, but I wouldn't have attempted this repair if I hadn't found your website and seen your detailed instructions. The pictures and step-by-step guide were perfect. My only difficulty was removing the big gear assembly (it took a fair amount of force to pop it off), but everything else was as you described. For those who had trouble finding a long screwdriver, I purchased a Kobalt 12" #2 screwdriver at our local Lowes yesterday (in stock, $8.98) and it was both long enough and narrow enough to fit into the holes. Anyway, thanks for all your work putting together the repair guide and creating the 3D impeller - very impressive. There are a lot of espresso drinkers out there who can once again enjoy their drinks throughout the day, thanks to you. Cheers!

Jack Hicks - Reply

Thanks for the story Jack. It really improved my evening. Enjoy your espresso in the morning.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thank you so much! Thorough guide, great descriptions and fixed the problem. I must have moved one of the gears so that even though my marks matched up, it was limited by one of the screws. I ended up backing off one of the screws like in the mod instead of taking it all apart. Cheers, Russ

russell - Reply

By the way, the impeller was a perfect fit and didn't need any adjusting at all.

russell - Reply

Glad to hear it Russel! Cheers to you also.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I was going to come here to ask about static electricity causing problems with the grinds FLYING all over the place, even defying gravity!

However, this issue was addressed here. I'll try it and report back.

THANKS!

G Rod - Reply

Ahh, I love this description. Hopefully "Troubleshooting #1" took care of you.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

For those of you that need to replace the main gear (mine had a few chipped teeth) the cheapest place to find one is here:

http://www.forumappliances.com/breville-...

Following this guide and going a bit further it's quite easy to replace. Mine is now working perfectly again. Don't forget to add more grease to the new gear and align the grind adjustment back to its original position. Don't pay the $90 service charge when you can fix it yourself for ~$10!

wrighttw - Reply

Yes, the "forumappliances" gear works perfectly and is much cheaper than the eBay offered one. Shipping cost from Canada is a little daunting though.

I got two just so I have a spare.

G Rod - Reply

Hi Ben, I'm following the tutorial and so far so good. I'm reassembling in step 15 and trying to get the 4 screws in with a long screw driver but can't seem to get the screws to line up into the holes. My screw driver doesn't have a magnetic tip which I am sure would help but do you have any tricks you use during this step?

Thanks

Ben

Benjamin Peacock - Reply

Hi Ben, Do you have a magnet? The stronger the better. You can magnetize the screwdriver by rubbing a magnet against it for a minute or two. If not this, perhaps put a dab of sticky-glue on the screwdriver tip and then place the screw on the tip. Let the glue set until it stays. Then proceed to screwing it back into the BCG800.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thanks Ben, I ended up using blue tac but your post got me thinking in the right direction

Benjamin Peacock -

hi Ben, i bought the impeller and was hoping the BCG860 impeller is compatible for BCG600SIL grinder. Hence i did followed your instruction however step 5 onward is different. I am having difficulty removing the top cover. Do you have any suggestion ? Or exploded view for BCG600 grinder?

vincent_85 - Reply

The BCG600SIL is new territory for me. That said, if you take a few pics of the current teardown state, I'll take a look and see if I can figure out what the next step is. You can post them to imgur.com or similar and then link here in the comments.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Sorry for the long wait. The BCG600SIL is confirmed to work with the BCG800 impeller. I have written up a repair guide here:

BCG600SIL Dose Control Pro Coffee Grinder - Jamming due to Worn Impeller

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Just a thank you note for the impeller design and guide. I contacted Breville after my grinder gave the symptoms you described and couldn't believe they wanted to charge me $90 to fix the problem instead of just sending me a replacement part. I really expected better service from them. In any event, after some Googling I felt very fortunate to get your guide and fix the problem for under $30.

It took me about 20 minutes to complete the repair, thanks to the very thorough guide. Everything worked perfectly the 1st time.

The only small adjustment I would make is the Phillip's screwdriver recommendation you made in the comments. I ordered that thing from Amazon and it it HUGE. A scredriver 1/2 of that size would've worked fine.

Jan van Rensburg - Reply

Glad to hear it. Enjoy your espresso!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Re the BCG600 grinder - I have one too, have bought the part (don't know if it'll fit yet), and am in the process of trying to disassemble. Found a nice exploded diagram at

https://www.needapart.co.nz/buy-online/p...

Got the front panel off - it looks to me like the silver grind adjustment ring has to come off in order to get inside, but hard to find where the clips are w/o damaging. I'll try spudgers made from old credit cards now ...

dave

David Blom - Reply

They appear to have updated the part on newer models of the machine with a new stainless steel impellar part which is far more efficient and shouldn't wear away. Just thought I'd let you all know.

Max Simmons - Reply

Hi Max! Thanks for the note. Do you have the newer BCG820 rather than the BCG800XL? I'm fairly sure the BCG800XL is the same across the board (plastic impeller) and the stainless one got introduced in the much later models. They likely had to make other changes to the grinder as well, since the stainless impeller's blade geometry looks much too short to work efficiently in the BCG800XL. In any case, I've added a note to "Step #1" above so folks know that if they have a *stainless steel* impeller design their problem is likely elsewhere.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Hi Ben! Thanks for this. I was about to buy a Baratza Vario when I found your tutorial. I have experience with 3D prints, but I think this is the first one that had actual real-world value! My only trouble with the tutorial was the deep screws for the cover. I first had to head to my local hardware store and pick up one of these: https://smile.amazon.com/Eazypower-35795.... It worked because I already had a 1/4 ratchet with a socket designed to take screwdriver bits, but I assume a 1/4 socket would work as well. My next issue came with trying to put those same screws back in, but a guy on youtube really helped out with that one. https://youtu.be/UWfuDG1-vH8 Otherwise, no trouble at all! (Except, maybe, screwing the bottom cover back on. It's weird how they routed the power cord in there.)

I am a little concerned with removing the felt gasket, however. My gasket was coated with fine grounds. No one has had any issue with dust getting inside there?

zachary eaton - Reply

Hi Zachary! That long screwdriver does seem to be a pain point for folks. Thanks for the useful links! As for the gasket, I think it's OK. The 3D printed impeller both hugs the pedestal more tightly (radially) and the base comes closer to the bottom of the chamber. Both of those leave less room for dust to ingress. That said, I'm coming up on a full year of daily use (3 double shots of espresso each day at 18g of coffee each) with my BCG800XL and ShapeWays impeller. I plan to do a full teardown at that time and that will be more definitive. So far so good though, as it's been clipping along great with no signs of slowing down.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

After the swap, it is not grinding anywhere close to fine enough for my espresso machine. I looked into the shim kit, but Breville customer service was not responding to web requests or tweets (and not answering their phone at 4:40 on Friday, when the website says they are open until 5:00), so I looked around elsewhere. It seems the shim kit is no longer available. I checked into buying .2mm shims of the correct size, but the fewest number I could find were in lots of 700, at a cost of $112. I thought about ordering them and selling lots of 10 on ebay, but that would be a pain. Anyway, I went to Ace Hardware and bought a zinc M10 fender washer, as it has the exact ID and OD of the original. I then took to sanding on plate glass; I got the washer from 1.5mm to 1.1mm before I gave up. (the original is .5mm). I decided to try it out anyway, and when I ran the machine dry, the burrs don't touch. I plan to give it a go in the morning and see if I can't get a proper grind (or seize it from too fine grinds!)

zachary eaton - Reply

Interesting, especially at 1.1mm on that washer since that's quite a lot. I'd still give Breville a call when they are open. There was another comment above from someone who successfully got the shim kit from them just last year. Also, don't forget: If you still need further adjustment range you can always try "Step 13 Optional Modification for Better Grind Adjustment Range". It's a bit of a hack, however used responsibly, it works very well and there's no way I'd go back after using it for ~9 months now. FYI: One other thing to watch out for with this grinder is there's a bit of lag in the fineness. When I make an adjustment from coarse to fine, it usually takes grinding about 36 grams until the fineness of the grounds coming out "catch up" to the new setting. In any event, hope your mods work out well. Cheers!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Hi Ben. Thanks for the great tutorial on addressing the design flaw for Breville coffee grinders. My BCG600SIL has just recently started jamming. Upon closer inspection, it looks like the impeller will need to be replaced. Just wondering if anyone has had any success in taking apart this model. There have been a couple of posts above with others having the same problem. The top of the grinder doesn't come off, even after taking out all the screws from underneath. I suspect that since the BCG600SIL model is made of moulded plastic, there are hidden tabs on the inside that keep the unit together. Before I start prying the top of the unit off with brute strength, can somebody shed some light on whether this is the best way of going about it? Or have I missed taking out a screw somewhere? Thanks in advance.

Desmond Jay - Reply

Hi Desmond, Unfortunately I haven't heard much regarding others' success or failure with the BCG600SIL so far. The best information I have is from David Blom's comment above. There's an exploded view of the internals: https://media.needapart.co.nz/manuals/BC...

Perhaps you can see if there's tabs or screws for each part there and hopefully make some headway. Definitely requires a bit more exploration. If you post teardown photos to imgur.com and link back here, I'm happy to take a look as well.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thanks a lot Ben for this guide!! Very useful and it saved my grinder as the Breville technician represented in a retail banner said he couldn't do anything about it!

I feel I am no longer getting much different grinding levels... I think I might of touch the outside knob when pulling on the big white gear / burr "wheel". Could that be it? I followed your advice with having it at it's finest and marking the 2 white wheels.

I will use the oil trick as I have static issues with the coffee, do you think keeping the little cotton ring would of helped?

Thanks

Luc

Luc Fréchette - Reply

Hi Luc! Hmm, aside from the two gears that shouldn't rotate, could the grey plastic cylinder within (ie: the upper burr holder) have gotten spun a bit? That part shouldn't be allowed to turn either. In any case, take a look at Step #20 above. Your lower burr height should look just like the 2nd pic. There are some tips listed that you can try if it doesn't. In addition to this, there is also the "last resort" option of the modification in Step #13. Between those two you should be able to get to a desired grind again. It's possible to mess with the gears also, but very difficult to get right. Not worth the risk unless you're sure it got messed up during disassembly.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I have a BCG400SIL which appears to be sold in Canada only, a stripped-down version of the BCG600SIL (no timer or lower-burr adjustment). Purchased it late-November 2016 and have been using it daily every morning, about a 1/2 cup of beans finely ground for espresso. It was set at 0 at first, which on my machine, was not quite powder. Not quite fine enough for my taste, but acceptable when tamped down tight. Over time, the grind got finer at this setting, so I slowly started bumping it up to 5, 10 and then 15. In the last month, I started noticing less grinds coming out with the usual quantity of beans. Cleaning did not help much or for long. So 5 months after purchase, it "ground to a halt" with the motor stopping mid-grind. That's when I took it all apart. The area around the impeller and the chute was completely caked. Not knowing this was a bad thing at the time, I was able to lift out the impeller with a bit of jimmying. The felt washer was completely shredded. (continued...)

Andre Mercier - Reply

(...continued) So I cleaned it all out, put it back together thinking I fixed it, but it jammed up again immediately. That's when I came across this page which I want to thank you for, as it gave me a clue to what was going on. It certainly is not obvious to even someone technically adept, that the nylon impeller was being ground down...right into my morning brew. The latter is something that has not been brought up, but that I think bears consideration: we've been brewing plastic along with our coffee grinds. Minute quantities perhaps, but who can say for sure it has no health impact? Since my unit is under warranty, I will attempt to have it repaired to see if they replace it with a stainless impeller, as noted by Max above. I will try to get that clarified beforehand, but may have to wait before reporting back. For those of you outside warranty, this would still be what should be considered a hidden vice. (continued...)

Andre Mercier - Reply

(...continued) In my home province of Quebec, there are laws that apply in this case, that force the vendor or manufacturer to honour a legal warranty up to three years after purchase. YMMV. Sorry for the long-winded message.

Andre Mercier - Reply

Thanks very much for the excellent repair guide for my 5 year old grinder (works for Gastroback Advanced Pro as it is labeled in Germany) and the industry 4.0 solution. The Shapeways part was delivered from the NL branch in no time (last October) - what are the odds for finding a part like this ready to order? Not observing the instructions in step 12 and accidentally rotating the parts of the burr holder cost me an hour or so- in case this happens the correct position is not fully twisted inwards but approx. 1 full revolution out. When everything was reassembled the grind was too fine and all the grinding time settings far off because of this. This I solved by with a set of 0.3 mm shims- if I recall correctly I ended up with two of these replacing the original washer. Now everything seems back at factory specs and working flawlessly everyday for more than 6 months.

Erik - Reply

Nice to hear Erik! Yeah, without ShapeWays we'd have been out of luck. I really like them, and it has been a fun project. BTW, if you're interested, I did a teardown of my own grinder at 11 months to see how well the impeller was holding up. Judging from the pics, I think we're in good shape for years to come: https://imgur.com/a/cVgST

Cheers!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaand, IT WORKS! Thanks so much for taking the time to figure out this fix, design the shapefile, make it available at a reasonable price online, and lastly, put together this top notch set of instructions! Shame on Breville for not taking responsibility and offering the part for sale. It is obnoxious in the extreme that they insist on requiring us to send the grinder back to them and charging $100 for the same fix. You are part of what is right with the world, providing quality solutions to counter the throwaway trend in our culture and economy!

Phil Blum - Reply

Thanks Ben, this guide is excellent and so is your Shapeways part- my AUS version is up and running like new. I didn't modify the impeller at all, it slotted straight in.

A tip for those with ridiculously coarse grinds - I accidentally rotated the "do not rotate" big cog at https://d3nevzfk7ii3be.cloudfront.net/ig... - rotating it back a full turn fixed that. Watch which way the adjuster knob turns it and turn it that way. Start your testing at very coarse in case you got it wrong. This should also work if you turned it around too fine.

To get the lid screw out behind all the wires, I placed the unit face down and pulled back & down on all the wires to get them out of the way. Here's a pic: https://www.dropbox.com/s/epzg8jz02szqq1...

Old vs New impeller: https://www.dropbox.com/s/nn9ub1r2o3a994... Yeah, big difference.

Thanks again Ben for the great replacement part and clear instructions.

Ewen Wallace (CAD bloke) - Reply

Glad to hear it Ewen! Thanks for the feedback!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I just went through this process and figured I'd add my two cents. Thanks to Ben for making this part available. I ordered the part from Shapeways and it was shipped within 24 hours of my order.

The instructions on this page and the youtube video made the whole process easy and straightforward. The new impeller fit perfectly. My only issues were with the coarse grind after re-assembly. I tried a few of the suggestions but they didn't help, and with no shims available I had to get creative. I ended up playing with the rotation of the large ring gear and the burr holder; this was the only way I could compensate for the increased gap between burrs (probably due to removal of felt washer). A full rotation (lowering upper burr) was too much, then I tried half a rotation (requires raising or removing screws so that you can still adjust grind properly from coarse to fine), which was still too much. I settled on about a quarter turn which was about right to compensate for the burr gap increase.

Ralph - Reply

Nice work Ralph. Adjusting the rotation is definitely an advanced modification, however looks like it works well. I'm sure other brave folks will benefit from knowing this. Thanks for the post!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

The part you recomended is to big now what

Earl - Reply

Hi Earl, Is your grinder a BCG800XL? What dimension is too large (radius, thickness, etc)? The impeller should measure up to the following dimensions:

Total diameter (blade tip to blade tip): 44.67mm

Height [z-axis] (lower base to top surface not including the pegs): 8.56mm

Drive shaft hole width [x-axis]: 10.16mm

Drive shaft hole length [y-axis]: 7.98mm

If any part of that is significantly off perhaps you got a dud. Worst case, ShapeWays has a money back guarantee, so simply contact their customer service team here:

https://www.shapeways.com/contact/contac...

Alternatively if the issue is minor, you can always apply a small bit of sanding to make it right. That said, size issues are very rare, with the one outlined in Step #20 above being the only one that I've encountered on occasion. Report back and we'll go from there.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

AWESOME! The replacement went trouble free thanks to your well detailed guide and all the efforts you have put in reverse engineering the impeller for 3D printing. Thanks a million! FWIW, I took a few pictures of before/after: https://imgur.com/a/Z3h0s.

Normand Cyr - Reply

Hi Normand! This is great! Man was that impeller worn down! Thanks for the feedback, and for putting together a glimpse of how it went! Enjoy your coffee!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Repair seemed to go well, but the grinder no longer stops at 2 cups. It just keeps going. Any suggestions? Thx.

David - Reply

That's a new one! Very interesting. Perhaps a wire got pinched creating an electrical short somewhere, or something mechanically is interfering with the activation switch. Or even, possibly from cleaning, water or coffee ingress into the switch mechanism or something.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I used this part to repair the Breville Barista Express BES860XL. I was having problems with the grinder jamming. Brushing and vacuuming out the accumulation in the grinding cylinder would alleviate the problem, but it got to where I had to do it with each use. I concluded I needed to replace the impeller or fan as Breville calls it.

ADDITIONAL STEPS FOR THE 860

There are a number of differences from the repair Ben depicts. In the 860 the upper burr is attached to the drive shaft; it cannot be removed from the top by removing the lock washer. A number of additional steps are required to remove the drive shaft and burr which sits on top of the impeller.

- The entire grind assembly needs to be lifted out. There are 4 obvious screws with washers to remove.

- The motor needs to be removed from the gear reduction box. Again, the 4 screws were obvious; however the back of the machine needed to be taken off to have enough room to work without breaking the motor wiring harness.

Geoff Silberman - Reply

- The gear reduction box needs to be taken apart. This requires some care as the torque limiter has 6 ball bearings on top of 6 springs. These would be easy to lose.

- The drive shaft should slide out. The first time I took the machine apart, it did. The second time ... well, I didn't put the drive plate on tightly enough, and as a result the end of the drift shaft mushroomed over the drive plate so it would not come off without a fair bit of sanding. Oof.

MODIFYING THE IMPELLER UPGRADE

The drive shaft for the 860 is circular rather than flattened on both sides (although I believe this too has changed for the 8700. So I used a Dremel to bore out the hole of the Ben/Shapeways replacement. The posts on top of the new impeller where thicker than the original--over 3 mm vice 2 mm for the original. I thought I would have to shave them down to fit into the burr, but they fit perfectly. It fit perfectly into the grind cylinder with no sanding.

Geoff Silberman - Reply

PERFORMANCE OF THE REPAIRED GRINDER

The new impeller works well. Rather than a trickle of grounds, it produces a torrent, some of which sprays over the edges of the portafilter. I think this is because the grounds are being swept out as they are produced, rather than being nudged toward the chute with the smaller impeller.

A more interesting phenomenon is this: the grounds are lofted. They used to be dense, almost sticky. Now they poof up. Again, I believe this is because they are coming out immediately rather than being compacted as they are nudged to the chute.

I am very happy with the repaired espresso maker, and extremely grateful to Ben for diagnosing the problem, designing a solution to it, and describing the repair in such terrific detail!

Geoff Silberman - Reply

Great work Geoff! The BES860 sounds a lot harder than the BCG800. I'm sure others will appreciate this bit of detail you've added in the future! Thanks for the writeup and enjoy your coffee!

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

5 months after install, and the grinder is working flawlessly! As some have commented, the grinder with the new impeller was spewing grounds everywhere for the first few months (as it had when new, and even though I followed the recommendation to coat with vegetable oil the new impeller and chute), but now that behavior is no longer occurring. Stellar experience, thanks!

Phil Blum - Reply

Thanks for the long term results Phil! It's so funny how the overspray goes away after awhile. Same experience here, except it took just a few days. I'll nominate for a Nobel in physics anyone who gets to the bottom of that one. Also just to clarify, don't ever coat the impeller with oil. Just the chute. I'm pretty sure oil in the chamber itself is a negative (at least till it gets absorbed).

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

I just replaced impeller. followed instruction step by step. not difficult from the beginning to the end but the problem started after putting the beans. as soon as beans in, the machine started making noise as if there were no beans inside. when I look at detail, the lower burr was not moving. any thought and suggestion?

thanks

tom

Aung Tun - Reply

Hi Tom, That sounds potentially gearbox related. Is it like this video here? https://youtu.be/PcQcbHIPqx8?t=1m17s One of the comments on that explains it as "its the motor spline rubbed the plastic cog groves away, the spline is metal and the internal gears cogs are some sort of plastic, when the rock jams the Burr then the motor spline keeps turning and rubs a flat spot on the plastic cog." Getting into the gearbox is a bit more work than the ifixit article covers, however Step 21 has some info to get you started.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Hey all! Ben, thank you very much for your time / energy put towards helping repair this thing!

Now, a question: I have this sound https://goo.gl/BPdiYU on the FIRST DAY that I got my grinder. I’ll admit that I was using home roasted beans, which are medium / light (actually more of a medium roast but because of the method I’m using there are some very light beans and some very dark beans also!). If you don’t feel like clicking the link, it’s the “clacking” sound, and it happens without beans in the hopper (and in fact with the trop part of the burr / grinder removed completely). I’m guessing I have to repair something, but before I get into taking the thing apart (on day one!) I was hoping somebody might be able to give a listen and give an opinion / confirmation that the sound you’re hearing is something that will require repair.

Thanks for your time!

Kevin

Kevin Mitchell - Reply

Hi Kevin, That sounds like gearbox problems. Here’s a similar one that had a rock get jammed in the burrs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcQcbHIP... If it’s a new unit (and not refurbished) it should still be under warranty. Breville is great at replacing stuff in that case and I’d go that route. If you do try to fix it, I would first unplug the unit and then put a ratchet on the acorn nut on the lower burr. Then manually rotate it around counter-clockwise a few times so the motor and gear train spins. It’s supposed to feel smooth throughout the rotation. Make sure the burrs are not hitting at all. If you do tear the thing down to check the gearbox, check both the gear-teeth and also check the torque limiter gear (Shown in Step 21 above). If it slips too easily, you may need to tighten the nut on it a bit.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

My question is the following. Why do you have to make the replacement part plastic like the original one? why not making it using metal and become a permanent fix?

tedrouss - Reply

Question: Why make the replacement part from plastic like the original one? If you take one of the new plastic parts and use it to create a mold you can have a metallic one which it can be a permanent fix.

tedrouss - Reply

It would be mostly unaffordable for folks. Shapeways offers metal print options however it is more than 5x the price. Print resolution is much lower as well after going from a print to a casting, and the tolerances are already pretty tight as is. Lastly, the nylon material holds up very well. I dare say it holds up significantly better than Breville’s original design. If you like, check out the wear study I did after almost a year of use in my BCG800XL: https://imgur.com/a/cVgST

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Everything went fine with the replacement, but I’m afraid it didn’t work for our BCG800. It still produces way too little output even with the new impeller.

Louis Cypher - Reply

Hi Louis, Are the beans a really dark and oily roast? Too oily and it can form a paste that is difficult to expel. If you are up for investigating, I recommend tracing the flow of a few beans through the grinder. Do they make it from the hopper onto the upper burr OK? Do they get ground up OK? Do they become “caked up” in the lower chamber or get expelled properly (Pull the burr and look)? Do they come out in pasty-clumps or like fine-powder? With the device unplugged, you can put a ratchet on the lower burr and force it (by hand) to rotate counter-clockwise with a few beans placed on the burrs. Then observe how it goes. You should also be able to feel the geartrain and motor rotating smoothly during this.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

Thank you Ben for this part. I want to say Shapeways were a pleasure to deal with their site has great communication, very professional. I installed your part but it ground just a bit too course for espresso on finest setting. I measured your part at 4.85mm thick (where it matters between washers) and the old Breville part is 5.29mm about 0.5mm difference. So I engineered up a 1.22mm washer (this thickness was what I had at hand and seemed suitable, thinning it more is tricky) to replace the shim (0.5mm) beneath the impeller. This worked well at fining the grind. I'm still fine tuning my dials but very successful thank you. Your part fit perfectly and I took the advice given in these comments to order two as the freight was the same to NZ.

Chester - Reply

Nice improvisation Chester. You might also benefit from “Step 14: Optional Modification for Better Grind Adjustment Range”. Making a custom shim is probably higher quality result in the end though. Thanks for the helpful feedback and glad to hear you are up and running in NZ again.

Ben Gottemoller SteadyMouseLLC -

This is excellent info and I just wish I had it sooner! I'd like to remove the fiber washer underneath the impeller and use a thinner washer to hopefully improve the coarse end. Then I could play with shimming underneath the bottom burr to improve the fine end.

Jack Franks - Reply

This is excellent info and I just wish I had it sooner! I'd like to remove the fiber washer underneath the impeller and use a thinner washer to hopefully improve the coarse end. Then I could play with shimming underneath the bottom burr to improve the fine end.

Order placed!

Jack Franks - Reply

Add Comment

View Statistics:

Past 24 Hours: 41

Past 7 Days: 316

Past 30 Days: 1,301

All Time: 21,151