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Revision to Tracking Device

Austin Blakely

Vehicle tracking systems are classified as either “passive” or “active.” Passive devices store GPS location, speed, heading, and trigger events such as door open/close and key on/off. When the vehicle returns to a predetermined point, the tracking device is removed and the data is downloaded to a computer for evaluation. Active devices collect the same information as passive tracking devices but transmit the data in near-real-time via cellular or satellite networks to a computer or data center.
 
Modern vehicle tracking devices usually combine both active and passive tracking abilities. When a cellular network is not available, the device stores indata to internal memory and transmits the stored data to the server when the network becomes available again. Historically, vehicle tracking devices are installed in a box, which is then placed into the vehicle and is either self-powered with a battery or wired into the vehicle’s power system.
Modern vehicle tracking devices usually combine both active and passive tracking abilities. When a cellular network is not available, the device stores indata to internal memory and transmits the stored data to the server when the network becomes available again. Historically, vehicle tracking devices are installed in a box, which is then placed into the vehicle and is either self-powered with a battery or wired into the vehicle’s power system.
 
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