1 TB SSD Hybrid 2.5" Hard Drive

$129.95

Product code: IF107-122

 

1 TB SSD Hybrid 2.5" Hard Drive

$129.95

Product code: IF107-122

Product Overview

Hybrid technology from Seagate combines SSD and traditional hard drive technology to provide SSD speeds from an affordable high capacity hard drive. Adaptive Memory technology keeps the files and file types you access the most ready and available for instant transfer from SSD.

No software or operating system requirements, Adaptive Memory technology is self-contained and works like any SATA drive.

To upgrade a 2010 or later Intel Mac mini you will need a Mac Mini Logic Board Removal Tool in addition to the tools in the kit.

Kit Contents:

Compatibility

  • All MacBooks and MacBook Pros (excluding MacBook Air and MacBook Pro Retina)
  • All Intel Mac minis
  • All Sony PS3 and PS3 Slim consoles

Product Details

  • Interface: SATA 6.0 Gb/s
  • Speed: Hybrid, 5400 RPM
  • Dimensions: 2.5" (69.85mm) x .37" (9.5mm)
  • Capacity: 1 TB Unformatted
  • Cache: 64 MB

$144.95 Upgrade Kit

 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

3-year manufacturer warranty

Notes:

This option contains the drive and the kit components.

$129.95 Drive Only

 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

3-year manufacturer warranty

Notes:

Seagate

Model #: ST1000LM014

Add to Cart
 

Replacement Guides

Mac Mini Late 2012

Difficulty: Moderate

Mac Mini Mid 2010

Difficulty: Moderate

Mac Mini Mid 2011

Difficulty: Moderate

Mac mini Model A1176

Difficulty: Moderate

Mac mini Model A1283

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Core 2 Duo

Difficulty: Easy

MacBook Core Duo

Difficulty: Easy

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Early 2011

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2009

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2010

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2009

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2010

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 17" Unibody

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Unibody Model A1278

Difficulty: Easy

MacBook Unibody Model A1342

Difficulty: Moderate

PlayStation 3

Difficulty: Moderate

PlayStation 3 Slim

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Compatibility

Mac Mini Mid 2011
2 GHz (Quad i7, Mid 2011)
2.3 GHz (Dual i5, Mid 2011)
2.5 GHz (Dual i5, Mid 2011)
2.7 GHz (Dual i7, Mid 2011)
Mac mini Model A1176
1.5 GHz (Core Solo, A1176)
1.66 GHz (Core Duo, Early 2006)
1.66 GHz (Core Duo, Late 2006)
1.83 GHz (Core 2 Duo, Mid 2007)
1.83 GHz (Core Duo, Late 2006)
2 GHz (Core 2 Duo, A1176)
Mac mini Model A1283
2 GHz (Core 2 Duo, A1283)
2.26 GHz (A1283)
2.53 GHz (A1283)
2.66 GHz (A1283)
Mac mini Model A1347
2.4 GHz (Core 2 Duo, Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Core 2 Duo, Mid 2010)
MacBook Core 2 Duo
1.83 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2 GHz (C2D, Late 2006)
2 GHz (C2D, Mid 2007)
2 GHz (Early 2009)
2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.1 GHz (Penryn)
2.13 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.16 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.4 GHz (Penryn)
MacBook Core Duo
1.83 GHz (Core Duo)
2 GHz (Core Duo)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Early 2011
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
2.7 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Late 2011
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.8 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2009
2.26 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.53 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2010
2.4 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012
2.5 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.9 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Pro 15" Core 2 Duo Model A1211
2.16 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
MacBook Pro 15" Core 2 Duo Models A1226 and A1260
2.2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.4 GHz (Penryn)
2.4 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.5 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Santa Rosa)
MacBook Pro 15" Core Duo Model A1150
1.83 GHz (Core Duo)
2 GHz (Core Duo)
2.16 GHz (Core Duo)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody 2.53 GHz Mid 2009
2.53 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Early 2011
2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Late 2008 and Early 2009
2.4 GHz (Late 2008)
2.53 GHz (Late 2008)
2.66 GHz (Early 2009)
2.8 GHz (Late 2008)
2.93 GHz (Early 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Late 2011
2.2 GHz (Late 2011)
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.5 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2009
2.66 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2009)
3.06 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2010
2.4 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.53 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2012
2.3 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.6 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.7 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Pro 17" Models A1151 A1212 A1229 and A1261
2.16 GHz (Core Duo)
2.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.4 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.5 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Santa Rosa)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody
2.53 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Early 2009)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.93 GHz (Early 2009)
3.06 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody Early 2011
2.2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody Late 2011
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.5 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Unibody Model A1278
2 GHz (A1278)
2.4 GHz (A1278)
MacBook Unibody Model A1342
2.26 GHz (A1342)
2.4 GHz (A1342)
PlayStation 3
CECHA
CECHB
CECHC
CECHE
CECHG
CECHH
CECHJ
CECHK
CECHL
CECHM
CECHP
CECHQ
PlayStation 3 Slim
CECH-20xx
CECH-21xx
CECH-25xx
 

Stories

My Problem

Old clunky HDD

My Fix

Took an hour to change out the battery, add the new 1TB harddrive, create an external drive with my old HDD, and boot.

My Advice

Create the boot drive before replacing the HDD.

My Problem

My friends Mid 2012 was as fast as a turtle. He was considering changing it, however budget was a problem, so I recomended upgrading two components that may be slowing the performance: hard drive (always at full capacity) and RAM.

My Fix

After receiving the products and following iFixit guides, part exchange was a piece of cake. In a few minutes I replaced the components and only took few more to reinstall OS X (I decided to make a clean OS setup).

My Advice

Even when I don't live in USA, I received the parts in a couple of days and the tools included in the hard drive upgrade kit made the whole process so much easier than other tools I used before.

Also my friend is delighted with his rejuvenated Macbook.

My Problem

My MacBook Pro (Mid-2010) stopped booting up and I took it to a certified "Apple Technician" at the University I attend in South Georgia. He determined there were bad sectors on the HD and was kind enough to recover the data he could to my external HD. In the next day or two he called back and said Apple had done something like an update to their own system contacts of certified technicians and he had not reappeared on their list. He spent a week holding the laptop for me hoping the negotiations with Apple would move quickly but they didn't and he let me pick up the laptop and my external HD for no charge since he could not complete repairs.

I looked around for other Apple stores, afraid to open up my mac and try installing a HD on my own. But, the other stores were more than 2 hours away, had more than a week's wait time to come in, and wanted more than I could afford to pay for repairs. Too expensive? Too far away? "It's time to try doing this myself."

An acquaintance who used to repair macs recommended IFIXIT and I couldn't have been more pleased with customer service: A human answers the phone and can quickly help someone take steps to problem solve and resolve issues. Everyone I talked with was pleasant and knowledgeable.

My Fix

The installation of the new HD (double the capacity of the old HD for 1/2 the price of what an Apple store or repair place wanted to charge for their whole process) was surprisingly easy using the tool kit I got with the HD and the online guide.

I took my time and sat down at a table (took a couple steps to try and avoid extra static buildup) and used scotch tape to put the screws on to organize the types and keep them from rolling away.

From the time I had the hard drive and tools set out on the table with the mac to the time I had it back together I'm pretty sure was less than an hour. (I was pretty reserved and cautious with each step.)

My Advice

My challenge came next trying to find a way to get the brand new HD formatted and then get the operating system installed. I had no recovery/installation discs that came with my mac and, again, the old HD had bad sectors so I had no HD or backup of my whole system or another way to get this done. I could have paid for someone to ship the discs and then waited another day or two, but found a much cheaper way using a USB (see below).

My model MacBook Pro (Mid-2010) does have internet recovery on it, but I ran into issues trying to use wifi at the college since drivers need to be installed to access the campus wifi. I was pretty disheartened until I went home to simpler wifi with just a password and was able to use internet recovery to format the HD (found directions online) so it would be ready to then install OS X (Mavericks).

The problem as of 2/11/15 was that the only operating system Apple has available to download from internet recovery is Yosemite and that wasn't compatible for my mac since I only had updated to Mavericks in the past. (I'm sharing all this because I had to learn it all from various sources and experience in the last week and hope it'll help someone and make their process shorter.)

I tried hard several times with a knowledgeable IT guy at the college to make a bootable USB drive of OS X Mavericks, but had no success until we just decided to look for other options than making the USB using all those steps ourselves. We came across a freeware called Diskmaker X, downloaded it, and it did all the steps of making the USB for me. It was awesome when I then plugged the UBS into my laptop, turned it on, hit the option key, and watched it list the USB. The install was seamless once I plugged in the USB.

So, several keys I came away with:

1) Invest the money into a good external HD and invest the time into regularly backing up with some program like Time Machine and look into options of using it to make a backup of the whole system (including the OS) so if it crashes or the HD goes bad, you'll have a lot more to work with than I did.

2) If you end up in a situation similar to mine and want to create a bootable USB (needs to be at least 8GB USB) you have to have access to another mac with administrative privilages to make the USB. You will log into your apple account on the other mac, download the OS X install program you had been using on your personal mac to this other mac and probably do something similar to what I wrote below.

3) I tried making the USB myself and eventually had to use the freeware Diskmaker X. My recommendation now, is for others to start by trying to use Diskmaker X. It's FREE and has options to make a bootable USB of OS X Mavericks and other versions like Yosemite. Save the time and hassle of trying to make it yourself. So glad someone suggested IFIXIT!

My Problem

I got a new laptop and thought that I'd give fixing up the old (late 2008 MacBook Pro) a try. If I failed, I'd still have the new laptop, so why not.

My Fix

I ended up replacing the battery (super easy), hard drive (up from 256G to 1TB, SSD/HD hybrid, fantastic!), and upped the RAM (4G to 8G). The key to the whole thing was iFixit's little screwdriver set. Without this I probably would have stripped the screws. With this set (and their guides), it was a piece of cake. And for a fraction of the cost (1/10!) the old laptop is almost like new :)

My Advice

Get the screwdriver set, it's worth it!

My Problem

Computer would not start up. Had a sata to usb adapter to check the hard drive. Found out it was unrepairable. Ordered a new one from ifixit. Arrived as promised.

My Fix

Repair was successful in about 20 mins. Very pleased with ifixit. computer runs better than before.

My Advice

Go for it it's not that hard.

My Problem

I'm a DJ so I needed a bigger hard drive

My Fix

It went well.

My Advice

There should be more links on how to transfer the data in the old hard drive to the new hard drive.

My Problem

No problems other than an older hard drive. I wasn't going to wait for it to fail before I changed it out. The dang things seem to always fail at the most inconvenient time. Relatively cheap fix for piece of mind.

My Fix

Very easy! The hardest part was waiting for the data to transfer. I used Carbon Copy Cloner, it was free and easy. The actual hard drive swap was very simple.

My Advice

Just watch the video they have and have a can of compressed air to blow out all the dust. Very simple fix.

My Problem

Had to go to web sites for instructions which is o.k.

My Fix

Great for the first time repair.

My Advice

most you find online no problem.

My Problem

My MacBook 13", end 2009, 250 Gb, 2 1Mb RAM, worked enormous slow after loading Yosemite. The imac 21.5" mid 2010, 500 Gb, 2 2Mb RAM, was a little bit slower after Yosemite but had open space for 2 more RAM chips.

My Fix

Inside the MacBook 13", end 2009 I changed the Hitachi HD 250 Gb. I put in a 1 TB Seagate SSD Hybrid HD and 2 new 4 Mb RAM chips. To do all this was really not complicated. ifixit delivered a super repair kit! First of all I studied very good the Youtube movies about the repair procedure.

To introduce the RAM chips in the imac was an easy thing. First I was a little bit worried about how strong you have to pull at the plastic bands to take out the chips. But for my case it was not really necessary to pull those out because there was open space which I filled with 2 2Mb RAM chips. Totally I have now 8 Mb RAM. The imac works now again the best.

Both make-ups were done in a short time.

Loading the datas from the old HD to the new SSD in the MacBook:

First of all I secured the datas on a LaCie back-up HD. After the make-up I tried first to reload from the old HD by using the delivered Drive Enclosure. This didn't work correctly. It showed the "mistake 254" again and again and I was not successful. So I tried with the Lacie HD. This worked the best.

My Advice

The most time I lost was to find the right RAM chip product for the imac 21.5" mid 2010.

I am very lucky to have found IFIXIT in the internet. It's really great how perfect all went on with the make-up of my old Computers: especially too the email contact, the order and payment administration and delivery. I ordered at 12-30-2014 in the morning and got the devices 01-05-2015 at 10.00 am at the door in Cham Switzerland (delivery over New Year's Day and Weekend!). Thank you very much! Great!

I have now the feeling and result of a brand new MacBook. That's amazing.

Peter Meier

My Problem

The original hard drive on my 15" mid-2012 MacBook Pro decided that a new life as a brick was something that it wanted to explore. I said "Fine, but you don't get to take the whole MacBook with you!".

My Fix

Easy peasy. The online repair guide was brilliant, and the whole job took a grand total of 30 minutes (for the actual hardware replacement)....the OS reinstall, well, that's a different story, since I couldn't find the original OSx discs. The good news? iFixit had the links I needed to get the info to create a Yosemite boot disc on a USB jump drive. It took a while to sort it all out, but I now have my non-bricked Macbook back, and it works even better!

My Advice

Do, do, do get the kit that they send you with the hard drive. It has all the drivers you need, gets you the spudger, and makes life a whole heck of a lot easier! The only thing that I would have wish I'd have known was how flimsy the edge of the battery connecter can be. It's easy to remove, but I broke a little piece by not prying it off at the best spot. It worked fine working in the middle of the connector, not so much at the corner.