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Broken fan power lead to logic board

I was replacing a noisy fan. When prying the power cable loose from the logic board, I broke the plastic base that is soldered to the logic board. Can this be repaired, or would I have to replace to whole logic board. As a side question, can you run O'k with one fan?

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Hi,

I have the same problem. I was trying to remove the logic board. One step at a time. When I went to remove the fan,

The little connector broke. The directions to remove the fan should be more specific, show a picture of the connecter itself.

If you get any response let me know.

Ed

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I managed to repair mine. Buy yourself a silver conductive pen and some 2 part epoxy glue.

Mix equal parts of glue together and use a wooden skewer to apply to the plastic connector. I had the connector sitting in the right place and just held it down while applying glue along the sides on the bottom edges. Wait for the glue to dry.

Then I used the silver conductive pen and made a small puddle on my desk and used another skewer to apply the silver to the 4 pins. This isn't easy and takes time.

You want to avoid using too much silver in one go. You may end up with 2 pins connected.

So far my fan works fine althou I still can't get a speed reading for it using smcFanControl.

Ps sorry for the crap formatting. Typed it on a phone.

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Even I broke this off and I like to think I'm pretty careful. I ended up sending it in to Apple. I used the flat rate plan and they replaced the screen, logic board and rubber bottom case for $325 with shipping.

I agree with a change in the guide. I've send a request to Andrew who wrote the guide.

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Hey, so I've edited every step I can think of that requires fan removal on all unibody machines to include a detailed picture of the fan connector and fan socket. An example can be seen here.

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Andrew - Thanks so much for the change. Regardless, I intend to superglue that socket in place before trying to remove that cable, it's just to weak a connection to the logic board.

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Ed,

The Circuit Writer Pen is the exact one I used.

Positioning the chip is a bit tricky. Depending how the pins broke, will determine how easy/hard it is to get it back in the exact position. Take your time.

I used the point of a scalpel blade to hold it in place while applying the glue.

You could try something like blue tack on one side, while you glue the other, then once its set you could glue the opposite side.

Applying the silver will complete the circuit, but it is tricky, I did it once (as mentioned above) then ended up wiping it all off and starting again. It is best to do it in stages. I used the point of a needle/pin to apply it the 2nd time. You want to avoid bridging the pins.

I highly recommend a magnifying glass and lots of light.

To be honest, I think I may end up trying to solder it. The idea seemed pretty scary to me, but after watching this video it doesn't seem too hard:

http://store.curiousinventor.com/guides/...

If you're not confident doing that, maybe just call your local electronics repair shop, or a mate who has some experience soldering. That way if they stuff it up (and are insured) it won't be you having to fork out the money to buy a new logic board.

Once you think you have it connected, turn on the computer and download smcFanControl. It's a menubar item that will show you the speed of the two fans. Hopefully you'll see in the menubar the rpm for both fans.

I kept getting a reading of 0rpm for the broken one, which meant one of the pins wasn't connected properly or was bridged.

The fans should be spinning around 2000rpm. If there is not speed reading from the fan, it'll be spinning at max speed (around 6000rpm).

Don't forget, be patient, and don't rush. If you're getting frustrated go make a cup of tea. :P

Good Luck.

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Hi Ben,

I'm willing to try it, but I have never used a silver conductive pen. Is it the same as a Circuit Writer Pen? The positioning of the connector on the board seems very difficult, any suggestions would be appreciated.

After the connector is in place, putting the "silver" on the pin will complete the connection board? I really do not want to screw it up more.

Ed

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Thanks again Ben and all the guys who helped in this problem. My screw up and the clarification of the guide.

Ed

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I was replacing the DC-In Board and had the same problem with the fan connector. I think the written instructions are VERY clear, however, in the case of this connector, the connection to the logic board is weak.

I think what might help are two photos, one showing the connector as it sits on the logic board without the fan cable in it and another photo showing the cable connector being removed from the connector.

I was extremely careful and still broke it. I think as someone above mentioned, the best thing to do is run a bead of superglue along each side of the connector before even attempting to lift the cable out. I was able to reconnect mine with glue and then the silver connective pen, but it's definitely a pain.

Robert

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No, don't get the Circuit Writer Pen. I did, but found that the fan's power lead wouldn't stick to the logic board. After pursuing epoxy per a post above, I found that the 8331 Silver Conductive Epoxy by MG Chemicals is recommended. It is a product that will bond the circuit to the logic board and even better, it's recommended for repairing electrical devices. But I haven't used it yet, so unfortunately I can't comment on its usability.

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david will be eternally grateful.
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