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Model A1502 / 2.6 GHz (Turbo Boost up to 3.1 GHz) or 2.8 GHz (Turbo Boost up to 3.3 GHz) dual-core Intel Core i7 processor with 4MB shared L3 cache.

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Replacing logic board, do I need to do anything to the SSD?

Finally bought a replacement logic board for my dead 2014 MBP, and it should be coming within the next week or so. It’s a bit of an upgrade, previously I had a 2.8ghz i5 w/ 8gb ram, and the new one will have 3.0ghz i7 w/ 16gb ram, so its not a straight replacement.

I still have my SSD in good working order. Do I need to do anything to it, such as a clean boot, some sort of initializing, or any reformatting to it before my computer will fully work again? I had thought that I could simply pop it into the slot, close it up, turn it on, and go, but I’ve learned that things are rarely that easy.

I believe it was running el capitan but I can’t quite remember. Should I upgrade to mojave once I get it running?

Thanks!

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With MacOS, that generally does work and you don’t need to mess with anything. That being said, there’s usually some performance issue that practically forces you to wipe the machine and restart if things are too different. I don’t think you’ll have any in your case since you’re upgrading to the i7/16GB motherboard.

See if you can boot it up as-is and figure out if you have any crippling performance issues - if you do not, run it on the old installation. If you do, backup your files and start over from scratch.

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Excellent, thank you! I think I might back up my files and start from scratch anyways now just to be safe.

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That's usually best if you have any doubts. The firmware dependency generation (Sierra-present) can be a real pain to do this with. High Sierra-present made it worse with APFS.

That said, as long as everything checks out you're usually okay to do this as if it's business as usual.

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No magic here!

If you got the correct board for your system, just follow the guide MacBook Pro 13" Retina Display Mid 2014 Logic Board Replacement. As far as swapping over the SSD again nothing special mechanically.

You might encounter an issue with the systems firmware depending on what the board has already. I would encourage you to prep up a bootable OS installer USB thumb drive before starting just in case. For starters you shouldn't need to upgrade. Here’s the possible startup screens you might encounter About the screens your Mac displays as it starts up if you encounter any let us know.

Going to Mojave might break some of your current programs so you might want to make sure you’ve updated them and see if there are alternative apps if it doesn’t support Mojave.

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Thanks for the info. In that case would it perhaps be worth it to simply move my important files to a backup drive e and perform a factory reset on it the first time I boot it up? Any apps I have can be easily reinstalled so I'm not concerned about that.

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I always recommend having everything backed up before changing things.

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Is the Sierra-present EFI dependence that different from what I'm used to?

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@nick - The only issue is the format of the SSD as Apple altered the file system from HFS+ to APFS with High Sierra and newer. The systems EFI Firmware (BIOS) has been magically updated with a few different things since El Capitan with almost every security update and major OS release. In the case of High Sierra it was modified so APFS file system could be used as a bootable volume.

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In that case, I'd recommend a wipe and reload to cover for all of these changes on the Sierra-present machines unless you know with 110% certainty it will work.

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