Fluffy pet with a tail and fun to play fetch with :)

2 Questions View all

Dog sniffs me constantly

Hello,

My dog sniffs me constantly for no reason. How do I fix it?

Update (12/11/2016)

Pic of Gracie :)

Block Image

Answered! View the answer I have this problem too

Is this a good question?

Score 3

Comments:

Hi, Not trying to alarm you but is it always in the one area? Dogs have been known to 'sniff'out problems in humans.

by

@jayeff its not in one place, it's all over my body :)

by

@gigabit87898 thanks for the picture of Gracie! Much better than broken devices...:-)

by

Hey this is happening with me and my dog but only in one place: my stomach, should I be worried?

by

Hi @amcdog2 ,

Depends how long your dog has been doing this, what particular smell may be in that area etc. Dogs do have a keener sense of smell than humans

Does the dog behave this way with anyone else?

If not and if there is no pain, discomfort, redness, swelling etc etc etc and the dog is still interested seek professional medical advice regarding this if only to reassure yourself.

by

Add a comment
Mac RAM Kits
Speed up your Mac. Max out its memory.
Mac RAM Kits
Get more memory out of your Mac.

3 Answers

Chosen Solution

Usually mine will sniff my wrists when I'm getting sick and even when my blood pressure is running high when I forgot to take my meds. Or if I have been out and around other dogs.

Also you may be hitting puberty about this age and your hormones are producing different odors that a dog may detect. How long have you had your dog? Have you started shaving yet and using an aftershave?

Was this answer helpful?

Score 3

Comments:

I've had my dog for about 7 1/2 years, my dog has been sniffing me like this forever.

by

@gigabit87898 , Depending on the some breeds of dogs and actually probably for most dogs, this is another form of their communication also. Some can actually sniff where you have been and with whom, and what they have missed.

When doing volunteer work at a kennel, to stop dogs from jumping up, sniffing, licking I would raise my bent knee up and guide them away, it seem to work and they learn't it was unacceptable behavior. Just adding to other good answers.

by

@lpfaff1 i can remember a few years ago my dog (Gracie) tried to eat a tree stump... Now she is missing one of her front teeth! Haha

by

@gigabit87898 , Funny you say that, my son has 2 boxers one 10 yrs and one 1yr old, after the older dog was about 4 Max started loosing his teeth, it's funny watching them wrestle/play it is almost like the younger dog Otis is laughing at Max, because all Max can do is Gum him, not too effective to keep Otis at bey. :-) . Have a good day all, have to go shovel about 6 inches of the white stuff.

by

@lpfaff1 haha, where do you live? We're getting 1-3 inches of snow tomorrow! :) maybe a 2-hr school delay!

by

Show 5 more comments

Add a comment
Most Helpful Answer

Hi, Perhaps you are being too friendly with it. My experience as a long time dog owner is that they really like to know their position in the 'pack'. Obviously your dog does not regard you as the leader. If so it would wait until you signalled that it could approach you. This is not to say that you have to be cruel or unkind or anything like that. It is just that you reinforce your position as the leader of the 'pack' by training the dog as to what you expect from it and your dog then knows its place in the 'pack' hierarchy. It will be happier because it is not worrying about what it can or cannot do in relation to you. At the moment it is treating you as an equal, basically trying to engage you into playing with it etc.

Just some thoughts

Was this answer helpful?

Score 6

Comments:

My g/f's dog does this. He comes into my space and sniffs me a lot. And I'm a very dominant man, so it angers me. I'm the leader not him. So one day I beat on my chest got on all fours and showed my teeth. wrestled with him and threw him down and dominated him. It worked, but I feel I was too rough. Any other suggestions?

by

Hi @renovatio1907,

With regards to sniffing. It isn't always in the same area of your body is it?

Not wishing at all to be personal or to alarm you but it is known that sometimes dogs can smell if there is a medical problem where they are constantly sniffing. If it seems to be random areas then they are just 'checking you out' as your are 'new' to their environment and bringing in new smells from the outside world

The dog needs to be taught what the boundaries are in regards to what it is allowed and not allowed to do with you.

I've found that the most effective way is by being consistent and persistent in your approach to it until it learns what the boundaries are. Your g/f (as she is the dog's owner) also needs to be accepting of what you want to do.

I suggest that you essentially ignore the dog until you are ready to engage with it, whenever you are in contact with it.

By this I mean that if it comes to you for attention in whatever form, sniffing, jumping, licking etc, ignore its' presence until you are ready to acknowledge that it is there. At sometime though when you are there do engage with it as you have to establish some sort of connection between you.

If it does do these things gently nudge it away from you with your knee etc. and say no firmly. You don't have to kick at it or wave your arms or hit it or anything like that. Also don't look at it directly as this may be interpreted as a challenge. Just be aware of where it is. Folding your arms also seems to confuse them and you'll find that they may stop to ponder what is going on.

If this doesn't work to dissuade it from doing it you may have to set up an area either in the house or outside (preferably with a view of where you are inside) where you can put the dog., e.g. on a mat in the corner of the room etc. and place it there and tell it firmly to stay. Obviously the dog won't want to stay there so it may be necessary to barricade it there until it settles down. Give it a dog's chew toy to distract it whilst there.

Please do though try to engage with the dog, even a few minutes may be enough and they'll be happy.

I've found that they like nothing better than to have a tummy rub or a scratch behind their ear (right where it joins the head).

This all takes time but dogs are smart and will soon pick it up.

Once the dog learns that say the "mat' is its' spot you'll find that it will go there automatically or on command to go there (the barricade doesn't usually have to stay there for too long). It will still want to come to you but will have learnt that to come only when you say so. When the dog gets old and if the mat/pillow is comfortable you'll have to drag the dog to you if you want it to come ;-)

it takes time so be a bit forgiving of the dog when it makes mistakes or misinterprets what you mean.

Afterwards hopefully you can enjoy having the dog around as they are great companions, loyal, give a lot more than they take and don't complain too much and are also great stress relievers.

Sorry about the long post.

by

Well, you could probably bathe in eau de skunk or simply tomato juice and/or vinegar. But then you may lose your g/f too.

by

Add a comment

To add to @jayeff answer

Since you disappear for long periods time (i.e. school) dogs will often sniff you when you come home wondering who you met up with (from a smell perspective).

You may also want to see what soap or other perfumed products you are using that might trigger the dogs sense of smell. Make sure you don't use different soap when away.

Was this answer helpful?

Score 3
Add a comment

Add your answer

Gigabit87898 will be eternally grateful.
View Statistics:

Past 24 Hours: 9

Past 7 Days: 130

Past 30 Days: 481

All Time: 5,368