The Jeep Cherokee (XJ) is a compact SUV that was manufactured and marketed by Jeep from 1997 to 2001. Sharing the name of the original full-size SJ model, but without a traditional body-on-frame chassis, the XJ instead featured a light-weight unibody design.

35 Questions View all

Intermittent stalling immediately after starting or punching gas

There is gas, the starter is fine, the battery is good. It doesn't matter what temperature the engine is or how long between starts but if I rev up the engine while cranking it starts okay. Rarely I have to rev at stops or the idle drops too low and stalls. If I punch the gas very quickly it revs and drops quickly and then stalls. Starting has a success rate of about 50% without revving. If it stalls, I must rev the engine to start.

Answered! View the answer I have this problem too

Is this a good question?

Score 5

Comments:

check to see if there is a hidden fuel filter in a black plastic housing in the frame rail between the fuel tank and the pressure fuel pump. It has 4 fuel line ports. Use a band type (oil filter) wrench being careful not to break the plastic bowl unscrewing it. Its tight to unscrew, I had to slightly bend my brake-line out of the way. The filter inside is 1 1/2" tall by 2 3/4" wide.

by

after finding this hidden filter, My truck has been running like a top, U would think, The big filter would do the first main filtering, and the small filter would be the after filter, but not on this ford, the housing doesn't like it unscrews having a filter inside, Its been missed over the 20 plus years, I'm sure this was why the prior owner sold it giving up trying to solve this problem of stalling out starting back after setting awhile purring like a kitten for the next few miles then repeating over,

by

Help!!! I have a 98 jeep grand Cherokee. Now while in park I pump on the brakes and it starts to feel like it wants to shut off. Can anyone help?

by

Add a comment
Black Friday
Broken doesn't stand a chance.

8 Answers

Chosen Solution

If you feel that the fuel pump has failed, then this is the proper way of diagnosing the problem before replacing an item that may not be needed. Starting from the basics, take off the fuel cap and listen closely for the fuel pump to come on as a helper turns on the ignition key. The pump runs for only 2 seconds at a time when the engine is not running. The computer shuts the power off to the pump if it does not see a signal from the crankshaft sensor.

Have the helper turn on the key for 3 seconds and off for 5 seconds and on again a couple of times. If the pump cannot be heard, then replace the cap and lift the hood. Check to see if the fuse to the fuel pump is good. If so, then look to see if fuel is the problem by removing the cap on the Schrader valve on the fuel rail on top of the injectors. Take a small screwdriver and push in on the Schrader to see if fuel comes out in force. If not, hold the Schrader in and have the helper turn the key on. Be ready to release the Schrader if there is fuel pressure, for it will come out fairly steady. If there is no pressure, replace the cap and check the relay. Remove the relay and test the terminals that it was plugged into for power with the key off. There should be one terminal with power. If not, there is a bad wire under the fuse block to the battery; it should have constant power at one terminal.

Take off the air cleaner and hold the throttle plate open with your hand. Spray some carburetor cleaner into the throttle body. Try to start the car for 2 seconds. If it starts, the fuel pump is the problem. If not, the engine should be checked for spark. It could be a sensor or computer-related problem. To be absolutely sure, raise and support the back of the Jeep on jack stands, unless the height allows you to crawl under the back without raising it. Unplug the fuel pump connector at the back of the fuel tank. It will be easy to find and has four wires in the connector. Use a circuit tester and test the harness side for power as your helper turns the key on and off. Remember that there will be power for only 2 seconds, so have your helper cycle the key on and off as you check the terminals, allowing 5 seconds between cycling for the computer to reset. If there is power, the fuel pump took a dump and needs to be replaced. If there is no power, there is an open in the harness to the pump from the fuse block.

Let us know your results and we can go further.

Was this answer helpful?

Score 6

Comments:

great answer +

by

This is what we did, but turned out that the pump has slipped up from the gas tank floor, and now I need to keep the fuel filled a little higher, and fill more often, 2.5 gallons of gasoline solved my problem. Yey for mechanic neighbor!

by

Add a comment

I hope you have had this fixed by now, but on my 2000 Jeep Cherokee Sport I had the same issue and it was the Throttle Control Module.

Was this answer helpful?

Score 3
Add a comment

My Jeep lives... no thanks to Chrysler engineers. I have had an issue with my Jeep randomly stalling for about 3 years. I researched the internet, Jeep clubs, and spoke with several mechanics. Needless to say everyone had a different solution. It ended up being the wire going from the Alternator to the battery and fuse box. Something none of the experts even considered.

Those of you who know about wiring... Chrysler engineers used 8-AWG wiring from the alternator and 6-AWG for the starter and the negative/ground. I discovered an issue with the wiring after I had played the role of a typical mechanic; testing and swapping out all of the usual culprits. I connected my 1/0-AWG jumper cables between my Jeep and my car. When connected, the Jeep ran OK, it stalled every know and then, but would start back up after a few seconds. If I disconnected the cables, the Jeep would die with in 5 minute... every time.

So... I tested the alternator. It was operating perfectly. So, why was my battery going dead? And, why was my Jeep dying? I removed the flexible plastic cover from the wires coming off the battery and the alternator to discover, (a) they were unusually small in diameter and (b) they had several burn marks along the wire run.

I have enough of a background with electronics to know that the skinny little wires were overheating and causing a drain on my electrical system. Think of running a compressor with a cheap extension cord... you get the picture.

I replaced all of the cables with 2-AWG, 300 amp, 680 strand welding cable. A little overkill, YES. It works beautifully. Love my Jeep. Total cost was $90 including tools.

Was this answer helpful?

Score 3

Comments:

Hi,

Glad you love your Jeep. Others are not that impressed with them!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVM3QX2G...

by

Update... after fixing the wiring, I discovered a secondary problem. The REDTOP Optima battery was over heating. I have had this battery replaced under warranty 3 times. I am now using a different battery.

The Optima battery was shorting out internally, causing the battery to get hot and trigger the "Battery Temperature Sensor". This along with the less than adequate factory wiring is the actual culprit which caused my Jeep to randomly stall. I discovered the battery issue after upgrading the wires.

I am currently running a no-name battery and have not had a stall since making the change.

by

Add a comment

start with the obvious.... any check engine light codes?

from there is to determine if this is an electrical issue or mechanical issue. using a fuel pressure gauge on the fuel rail can tel you if the fuel pump is not supplying enough fuel pressure. if thats fine, then check for vacumm leaks. how old is the jeep? older ones rely a lot on O2 sensor for the proper idle and if the sensor is bad, it can cause the described symptoms.

if all that is good, then do a compression test and a leakdown test. that will tell you if you have any mechanical issues with the engine.

cars only need air/fuel/spark.... if all are present is that they arent being used properly because a system is not working right

Was this answer helpful?

Score 2

Comments:

My my 1990 Jeep Comanche 4.0 will start right up and then about 30 seconds later it will try to stall but catch its self just before stalling I was messing around unplugging sensors and got to the O2 sensor unplugged it and no more stalling I love my jeeps I have a 88 Jeep Comanche 89 Jeep Comanche 1990 Jeep Comanche and a 1996 Cherokee Country high output lifted up real nice 215000 miles on it and it purrs like a kitten getting ready to purchase a few more I'm addicted something about them square bodies there so sexy good luck fellow jeepsters

by

Add a comment

I had a similar issue after I swapped the intake manifold & power steering pump from a 1999 Jeep to my '95. When accelerating quickly (onto the freeway for instance) it would stall. I would pull over and it would restart fine. After sticking my head back under the hood, I figured it out: Since the intake manifold was different, the vacuum fittings were different also. When I checked the engine codes, it was giving an error about the MAP sensor input. One of the vacuum hoses were not tight. I also found that the vacuum line going to the FPR at the front of the engine was contributing so I took it off and all has been well since then.

Bottom line: troubleshoot your vacuum lines and the things they connect to/from. If it's stalling when you punch the gas, it points to fuel pressure but your symptoms also point to a vacuum leak.

Was this answer helpful?

Score 1
Add a comment

Sounds like John Hanks is right, throttle position sensor.... take out the sensor or get access to it by removing the intake so you can see down into the throttle body.......and clean the heck out of it. If the problem is better (rough idle or low idle), safe bet the throttle position sensor is the issue and they are easy to replace..... if you know someone that has one, you can also hook up one of those diagnostic computers and tell it (the jeeps computer) to raise the idle speed, if it won't do it = throttle position sensor is to blame........ I have one of these jeeps, and the crank position sensors can go bad too, fairly common actually......however usually they just won't start. (since the computer doesn't know what position the crank is in)...... this sensor is also fairly easy to replace..... just hard to reach.

Was this answer helpful?

Score 1
Add a comment

I have run into this prob many times if you have cleaned the throttle plate

Well you may want to try my fix.

I'm a 28 year mechanic and repair this problem on many jeeps, fords,

Chevys ect.. What you can do is drill a small hole in the throttle plate

About 1/8 - inch be careful pu a rag or towel to catch shavings. Put the breather assembly back on and test drive to relearn computer .

Problem should be solved. I also have noticed lots of the newer

Models of cars and trucks already have the hole drilled. Good luck

Brad. Greesemann

Was this answer helpful?

Score 1

Comments:

Brad you won't be working on my stuff. That is a shadetree fix and NOT acceptable.

by

if it works do it.

by

Where do you think engineers get there ideas?

by

Being a mechanic we have to solve all the fups engineers design.

by

Add a comment

My 2000 4.7 JGC is acting similar. I pretty much have to keep my foot on gas pedal (even while braking) or it dies-but it starts right back up. Other times, it takes a bit and will even start without me turning the key. We haven't read a definite fix, but keep reading that people are suggesting we alter the screws to the PCM [add washers, cut screws] or to look inside to see if solder is damaged. Others say to change crank aND cam shafts positioning sensors. We've done this... but with auto zone parts. We are so lost. Anyone have any thoughts?

Was this answer helpful?

Score 0

Comments:

I had that same problem with my stock supercharged 1.3L VW Polo G40. I had to keep foot slightly on the gas, everytime the rpm dropped from a quick stop at a red light or just being parked, no matter how cold or hot the engine, or else it would drop way below 1k rpm and eventually stall completely. I solved the problem by simply removing the throttle body and doing a good cleaning with carb cleaner spray. Also re-tuned the throttle position sensors and the idle screw. I suspect there was some residue breaking the contact from the throttle sensors somewhere, though I can't really tell where exactly. Thankfully, It is running fine and smooth now!

by

Add a comment

Add your answer

Mike will be eternally grateful.
View Statistics:

Past 24 Hours: 192

Past 7 Days: 1,147

Past 30 Days: 5,849

All Time: 109,630