Released on September 19, 2014, this 4.7" screen iPhone is the smaller version of the iPhone 6 Plus.

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phone wont turn on after batter replacement

Hello everyone, I had replaced my screen a few weeks ago and I all ready know it has nothing to do with that. But I had realized my battery was bad so I got a new one my phone was died before I took old battery out and put the new one in but it's been more then 24 hours and my phone still won't turn on. I did try the Apple boot loop and that didn't even work. I don't know if it's just still died if it's my charger, which I did change just in case it was, or if I put the battery in wrong or messed my phone up during the process of taking the old one out. Please help!

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If you can, use a known-good battery and install it or put your unknown battery in a known-good iPhone 6. That is the best way to tell if your battery is the problem or not.

However, if the battery is fine, you probably have a problem with your phone charging circuit. No charging and fake charging are classic symptoms. This is controlled by the Tristar (U2) IC. This type of problem is not a DIY repair.

This also coincides with a recent screen replacement. You say it has nothing to do with your battery problem but it's quite common that users will open their phones and damage something inside. You should inspect the area around the screen connectors and battery connectors and look for damaged pins or missing surface mount components. Use a magnifying glass or jeweler's loupe.

If everything looks okay and you can confirm the battery is good, then you need to have your phone looked at by a a repair shop that does micro-soldering repairs.

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To summarize:

1- Battery depleting very fast could be short on the board, or bad battery. Replace with new or at least known good to test. I highly recommend iFixit batteries because otherwise bad batteries and repackaged/used/worn batteries are the norm, not the exception.

2- Battery turning off at 40% for example and turning back on at that same percentage or something significantly higher than 1-4% is:

2-a- Either a firmware bug (known iOS 10 issue, update or even better restore from DFU to the latest iOS version after backing up. 10.2.1 and newer are supposed to fix it),

2-b- Or a bad battery of 2-a doesn't solve it. Go back to point 1.

3- Your charging port is bad and needs replacing.

4- Your charging circuit is bad and needs replacing. Board level issue.

[1-2-3: when you connect the charger, you have to be able to see a battery icon or battery+cable icon. 4-5: you could be seeing those, or not].

5- You "think" your iPhone is not turning ON because nothing appears on the screen; but when you connect the iPhone to a computer, iTunes detects the iPhone and tells you to allow access/trust. Or if already trusted in the past, you see the iPhone details in iTunes. In which case you damaged the display circuit when replacing the battery. Or you damaged the screen assembly.

5-a- Try a known good screen. It has to show an image, so the test screen can be an old cracked one. As long as it is known to show an image.

5-b- If you rule (5-a) then either you backlight is damaged, or your display circuit is damaged (connector, filters, chestnut to name a few), or you caused long screw damage to the bottom left screw hole of the shield holding the screen cables in place.

[4 and 5 all require micro soldering tools and skill to trouble shoot properly and repair].

I hope I didn't forget anything but the above are the most common issues we see coinciding with a screen or battery replacement.

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