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Released on June 23, 1996, Model NUS-001, 64-bit gaming console

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My n64 has no sound?

this n64 works i can play games but i don't here the sound. Sometimes i will hear it for 2 seconds than it will cut out and also it statics sometimes and it cuts out too. Im stuck i cleaned everything

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any help will be appreciated thank you.

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@mmusk818 check and possibly use another AV cord. Just in case. Check the contacts make sure they are clean and not bend or broken. Double check the solder joints on the AV port for any cracks etc. is broke, here is the guide for the port. Check components around U1 which is your MAV-IC Digital to Analog converter (DAC) video/audio. Let us know what you find.

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thank you it works :)

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thanks your help has been very good.

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Hi @mmusk818 hope you have fixed your N64 by now. And hello everyone arriving here by searching “n64 no audio”. I found this thread (again) after searching online for the solution that worked for me and since I saw it nowhere I wanted to share it with you guys.

I also had audio issues with my childhood N64 a while ago and I tried all these suggestions here but none of them worked until I got the sound fixed just last week all thanks to a Brazilian YouTube video that came out July of this year.

Basically I ended removing the rightmost chip (with the control ports facing you) U2, and bridged contacts 3-7 and 8-12(they are numbered on the board). And it frigging worked! (sorry for the quality and lack of photos, in the excitement I forgot to take photos of the wires I soldered, perhaps for the best)

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I had no issues with my N64. The chip I removed is stated to be an amp but I noticed no sound quality or volume loss. Apparently that chip is there only to close those two paths.

Alternatively it might be a problem with the capacitors C25, C26 or C142. So replacing them might work too. Check them for shorts.

If ripping off a chip from your n64 seems too scary/drastic (please don’t literally rip it off, desolder it) then soldering a wire between U2’s contact 7 and the capacitor directly above it (C142, the one between caps C25 C26 and the U2 chip) can do the trick (for me it didn’t).

Hope it helps, dunno if posting a YouTube video or referring to is allowed so let me know if I can and you want the link. Would love to give the guy from the video the due credit.



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Hello, I did a cap change and it didn't work. I'm very interested in that video, please share the link if its not much trouble. I'm glad it worked for you.

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Here you go! By the way there is another method discussed in the video where you solder a wire from 7pin 7 in the U2 chip straight to pin 11 or 12 (either is fine) in the output port.

Hope it helps to resurrect yours

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jojtLLWT...

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https://imgur.com/gallery/tSAmNEi?

Followed this and it worked for mine. Not sure how though.

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Removing/jumping the amp only sends unamplified DAC audio through. While it may be loud enough without the AMP-NUS chip, the chip also muxes the cartridge/expansion port audio so you will lose that (not really a loss for most of us!). This was probably used for the 64DD capture cart and maybe the Shogi 64 chess cart with the built-in modem (for hearing the dial tone and carrier sounds).

The problem isn’t even the AMP-NUS chip, as I replaced it with a known-good chip and still had the same problem. Accidentally zapping C28 with 12v is what fixed it for me and at least one other (StealUrKill above, who told me about this thread). The cap is rated for 25v so it won’t hurt it and the AMP-NUS is powered by 12v so it’s probably fine too.

I figured this out accidentally when my prob slipped to short pins 1 & 2:

https://imgur.com/gallery/tSAmNEi

I was working my way back from the AV multi-out and had replaced all those caps as well as the AMP-NUS chip itself, but I had not yet replaced C28 when I accidentally zapped it… still haven’t yet it works great now 2.5 years later.

If you don’t want to zap yours, you could just replace C28 or build your own amp based on the designs available in the N64 portablization community. That entire area literally gets chopped off when they “trim” the board down to make the whole console smaller. ;)

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Thanks to @sarmatios , I repaired my N64 too.

I removed the chip and bridged the connections and had still no sound. The only thing that worked for me was a wire from pin 7 to the output port like he said. But you have to connect pin 8 of U2 to the port too or you will get just mono. Pin 7 is for the right audio channel so it should connect to pin 12 of the multi out and pin 8 of U2 to pin 11 for the left audio channel.

I have no clue whats actually broken. The capacitors are fine. Maybe the resistors R57 and R58 on the back.

Anyways, thanks a lot guys.

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where did u connect the wires to?

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@mmusk818

I connected them to pin 11 and 12 of the AV Multi-Out. Pin 7 to pin 12 for the left channel and pin 8 to pin 11 for the right channel. The pins are marked with L and R on the back.

Sorry for the late response. I've never got an notification for a new comment.

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https://imgur.com/gallery/tSAmNEi?

Followed this and it worked for mine. Not sure how though.

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Make sure your cable is plugged in do not remove or blow into the game which can cause some damage. If your sound is not working take it to someone who can service it or help you further more.

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I have a similar problem. I found my old N64 and I cleaned it and in worked but no sound at all. I checked the cables with a multimeter and they were fine… so it had to be the board. In my research to fix it I have found usefull info that I haven’t tryed mysef yet, but it might help you:

  • the capacitors that go through the audio might need replacement
    • If you buy a HDMI ultra mod this bypasses the capacitors and process the video and audio on its own
    • If HDMI mod is too expensive replace the capacitors

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I tried it Today With It my Games Work On it But No Sound & I Threw it Away

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Okay, my solution is radical and I would not recommend it if you are not desperate and have not tried everything already. I just removed capacitor 28 and the sound is back. That’s it. I will update this answer if some sort of catastrophe happens in the next days.

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Sounds similar to this.

https://imgur.com/gallery/tSAmNEi?

Followed this and it worked for mine. Not sure how though.

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I guess I should add this here so it has a chance to get voted up as an answer:

After replacing the AMP-NUS with a known-good spare and replacing every capacitor between it and the AV multi-out, I still had no audio. I was measuring voltage on pin 1 of the AMP-NUS when my probe slipped and momentarily shorted 12v from pin 1 into pin 2, instantly restoring audio. AMP-NUS pin 2 goes to ground through C28… nowhere else. Because the AMP-NUS was already replaced with a known-good spare, that means C28 is our culprit.

I never finished installing my replacement capacitor kit. I wanted to see if audio failed again so that I could see if replacing C28 also works but it’s been 2.5 years and it’s still working great. I haven’t come across any more with faulty audio to try replacing C28 but StealUrKill above replicated my results. He restored his audio by deliberately shorting 12v to C28.

My hunch is that faulty mainboard capacitors only happen on very late model N64 consoles as the industry was reformulating capacitors for RoHS compliance and the formulas weren’t yet refined. Mine was a NUS-CPU-09-1 revision board (the very last) inside a NUS-101 “Pikachu” console and I saw another with a capacitor-related video problem which was also a Pikachu console. My C28 is a 25v Panasonic/Matsushita HA series electrolytic with no “lead free” dot but this was well after manufacturers began reformulating (see “the Capacitor Plague”).

TL;DR: Power on without the heatsink and momentarily touch pins 1 and 2 of the AMP-NUS together with audio playing. You’re welcome. ;)

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Touching 1 pin and 2 briefly brings back the sound. Works in my case. Just don’t know if this is permanent.

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Martin Muskus will be eternally grateful.
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