The redesigned 2005 Dakota still shared its platform with the new Dodge Durango SUV (which is now similar to the Ram platform).

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Where is the blower motor and resistor

where is the motor and resistor on a Dodge Dakota 2011-also if the motor only works on HIGH, is that going to be the resistor or the motor....... everything works good on HIGH only

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sandra reed, just checked the service manual and the blower has only one fuse for all settings. Besides the actual switch having failed (unlikely) you are most certainly having issues with the blower resistor.

DESCRIPTION

The blower motor resistor is mounted to the HVAC air inlet housing, directly behind the glove box. The blower motor resistor consists of a molded plastic mounting plate (1) with an integral wire connector receptacle (2). Concealed behind the mounting plate are coiled resistor wires contained within a ceramic heat sink (3). The blower motor resistor is accessed for service by removing the glove box from the instrument panel.

The blower motor resistor is accessed for service by removing the glove box from the instrument panel.

DIAGNOSIS AND TESTING BLOWER MOTOR RESISTOR

WARNING: On vehicles equipped with airbags, disable the airbag system before attempting any steering wheel, steering column, or instrument panel component diagnosis or service. Disconnect and isolate the negative battery (ground) cable, then wait two minutes for the airbag system capacitor to discharge before performing further diagnosis or service. This is the only sure way to disable the airbag system. Failure to take the proper precautions could result in accidental airbag deployment and possible personal injury or death.

NOTE: For circuit descriptions and diagrams, refer to the appropriate wiring information. The wiring information includes wiring diagrams, proper wire and connector repair procedures, further details on wire harness routing and retention, as well as pin-out and location views for the various wire harness connectors, splices and grounds.

1. Disconnect and isolate the negative battery cable.

2. Disconnect the wire harness connector from the blower motor resistor (Refer to 24 - HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING/CONTROLS/RESISTOR-BLOWER MOTOR - REMOVAL).

3. Using an ohmmeter, check for continuity between all of the blower motor resistor terminals. In each case there should be continuity. If OK, repair the wire harness circuits between the blower motor switch and the blower motor resistor or blower motor as required. If not OK, replace the faulty blower motor resistor.

REMOVAL

WARNING: On vehicles equipped with airbags, disable the airbag system before attempting any steering wheel, steering column, or instrument panel component diagnosis or service. Disconnect and isolate the battery negative (ground) cable, then wait two minutes for the airbag system capacitor to discharge before performing further diagnosis or service. This is the only sure way to disable the airbag system. Failure to take the proper precautions could result in accidental airbag deployment and possible personal injury or death.

WARNING: The blower motor resistor may get very hot during normal operation. If the blower motor was turned on prior to servicing the blower motor resistor, wait five minutes to allow the resistor to cool before performing diagnosis or service. Failure to take this precaution can result in personal injury or death.

1. Disconnect and isolate the negative battery cable.

2. Remove the glove box (Refer to 23 - BODY/INSTRUMENT PANEL/GLOVE BOX - REMOVAL).

3. Disengage the wire harness connector locking tab and disconnect the wire harness connector (1) from the blower motor resistor (2).

4. Remove the two screws (3) that secure the blower motor resistor to the HVAC housing (4).

5. Remove the blower motor resistor from the HVAC housing.

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Here is a great video on how to do the entire procedure.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-M6v2Ydf...

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I have an 01 Durango and an 04 Dakota, both have the same issue. I've replaced countless resistors, wiring harnesses and blower motors. STILL have the same problem. All of this is wired into the ignition switch. I'm not wanting to replace the ignition. Dodge knows there is a major problem with this issue. It happens on all years and makes of Dodge. Most forums tell you the same thing. Change this, change that. I want to bypass all of it and wire direct. I'm sick of throwing my money out the window and Dodge doing nothing about it. And wouldn't you know, they go out at the most inopportune times. No AC in the heat, and no heat in the winter. Dodge needs to get better "engineers"!!!!

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Ok the motor is not a problem. Locate any and all fuse banks, then any and all fuses related to the low and med. setings. Replace any blowen fuses(burnt center with the metal strip broken)with like fuse(20 with 20 only)if you replace with a higher or lower fuse(20 with 30 or 10)you will damage your electric system. I have had your isue in a 99 Durango. i hope this helps.

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Comments:

It's NOT the fuses. I've changed all of that and there is still a problem. Blower motor is pulling too many amps. I've replaced everything and still have the issue on my Dakota and Durango. Dodge knows this is an issue. It's a "grounding" issue and they have it grounded to the ignition switch. I don't want to pull the dash either. Looking for a way to wire direct to bypass all the Dodge "junk".

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I agree, its not the fuses. I'm having the same problem. Waiting for a solution. The source of the problem that is melting the resistors and harnesses. Can you redirect a ground somewhere else?

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sandra reed will be eternally grateful.
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