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How can I find out how many shutter actuations I have left?

How can I find out how much shutter actuations I have left on my camera?

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This will show you how to tell how many pictures your camera has taken so far.

Many cameras are rated to have tens of thousands of actuations - some high end cameras are rated as highly as 150,000 actuations. Even then, many cameras will not immediately cease functioning as soon as they have taken that many pictures.

Most cameras will continue working properly quite a long time after they have reached their rated number of actuations.

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For Nikon, that information is sotred in the EXIF data (Exchangeable image file format). Any free EXIF data reader will tell you the actuation count on the camera.. As the D200 is a Prosumer camera (almost professional) it's actuation count is 300,000k clicks. This means that on average, the shutter is rated to shoot 300,000k pictures before it needs replacing (it will cost around $500 or so plus labor which is... not cheap). Although there have been people who's shutter still works after 325,000 clicks.

There is no set "actuation count" before the shutter breaks (it would be amusing if Canon or Nikon programed the camera to break at a certain amount of clicks), so there is no telling how much you have left but it gives you a good estimate.

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+great answer. but for the "break at a certain amount of clicks" - think about the eos 300d - many of them died after ~10000 clicks. i think that comes close to "let it break after xxx clicks" (cheap plastic crap) - i think i stick with my eos 20d and my dp1s ;-) ah - almost forgot, here (click me) is a nice chart for the D200

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I wrote a whole comment to your answer!!! But you deleted!!! >:O

Anyway I was saying that the 300D is the cheapest of the EOS line at that time and was aimed towards the consumers. However, the more professional cameras (lower digits for canon, odd number of digits for Nikon) have a much better QC.

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What did i delete?? maybe it was because of the system problems here, sometimes i don't see my answers/comments.but surely - everything with less than 2 digits is "not that great" - but there are many people who aren't aware of that.

i'm not the biggest canon fan, my 20d is good, if i ever would go for another canon dslr it would be a eos 1d (but i would most likely go for a good old mamiya 645 first)

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You wrote an answer, then deleted it to make a comment :P. Anyway its a great dSLR but it was thought with an average consumer in mind. Keeping costs cheap was important. The Rebel series of Canon dSLRs were famous for being the first dSLRs under 1k bucks (USD). Definitly, if I could pay for it, I'd get the 1D Mk IV or the 1Ds Mk IV (When that comes out) but for now I use the 5D and the 7D and both are amazing, work up to par, I have put both of them thru %&$# and back and I am very satisfied with them.

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oops - sorry ;-) surely the 1 digit eos's are great but they have issues when they're new. i#ll stick with my 20d - the next larger investment in this area would be for a good old mamiya or a hasselblad

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the easiest way is to take a picture and upload it directly to EXIF online, which will give you the actuations (see "shutter count") in a few seconds.

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