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Current version by: cns ,

Text:

There's alot of different techniques.
 
I use a soft toothbrush and an electronic contact
 
cleaner spray. The kind that leaves zero residue.
 
Available at radio shack or over in the electronics
 
section pfof lots of stores like Fry's. Got my last spray
section pfof lots of stores like Fry's. Got my last spray
 
can at the auto parts store. Alcohol is a good substitute
 
but zero residue contact/electronic spray can is The Right Thing.
 
Using contact cleaner in a spray can works best because
 
the spray pressure will chase water out of small components.
 
The key to using a hair dryer or heat gun is to put it on low.
 
Warm...low....no heat, just blow room temp....whatever
 
your favorite tool has settings called like that. Low temperature
 
is the key. I let it blow for a full day. Or many hours.
 
Some people say no heat gun/ hairdryer because they're
 
afraid you'll melt the solder or wire insulation and do
 
additional damage. Well, I've got news for them.
 
I use precision of judgment and I do not fry my
 
delicate electronics under a 650 degree heat gun
 
set on high. And I'll bet you can pull it off too.

Status:

open

Edit by: cns ,

Text:

There's alot of different techniques.
 
I use a soft toothbrush and an electronic contact
 
cleaner spray. The kind that leaves zero residue.
 
Available at radio shack or over in the electronics
 
section pf lots of stores lilelike Fry's. Got my last spray
section pf lots of stores lilelike Fry's. Got my last spray
 
can at the auto parts store. Alcohol is a good substitute
 
but zero residue contact/electronic spray can is The Right Thing.
 
Using contact cleaner in a spray can works best because
 
the spray pressure will chase water out of small components.
 
The key to using a hair dryer or heat gun is to put it on low.
 
Warm...low....no heat, just blow room temp....whatever
 
your favorite tool has settings called like that. Low temperature
 
is the key. I let it blow for a full day. Or many hours.
 
Some people say no heat gun/ hairdryer because they're
 
afraid you'll melt the solder or wire insulation and do
 
additional damage. Well, I've got news for them.
 
I use precision of judgment and I do not fry my
 
delicate electronics under a 650 degree heat gun
 
set on high. And I'll bet you can pull it off too.

Status:

open

Edit by: cns ,

Text:

There's alot of dofferentdifferent techniques.
There's alot of dofferentdifferent techniques.
 
I use a soft toothbrush and an electronic contact
 
cleaner spray. The kind that leaves zero residue.
 
Available at radio shack or over in the electronics
 
section pf lots of stores lile Fry's. Got my last spray
 
can at the auto parts store. Alcohol is a good substitute
 
but zero residue contact/electronic spray can is The Right Thing.
 
Using contact cleaner in a spray can works best because
 
the spray pressure will chase water out of small components.
 
The key to using a hair dryer or heat gun is to put it on low.
 
Warm...low....no heat, just blow room temp....whatever
 
your favorite tool has settings called like that. Low temperature
 
is the key. I let it blow for a full day. Or many hours.
 
Some people say no heat gun/ hairdryer because they're
 
afraid you'll melt the solder or wire insulation and do
 
additional damage. Well, I've got news for them.
 
I use precision of judgment and I do not fry my
 
delicate electronics under a 650 degree heat gun
 
set on high. And I'll bet you can pull it off too.

Status:

open

Original post by: cns ,

Text:

There's alot of dofferent techniques.

I use a soft toothbrush and an electronic contact

cleaner spray. The kind that leaves zero residue.

Available at radio shack or over in the electronics

section pf lots of stores lile Fry's. Got my last spray

can at the auto parts store. Alcohol is a good substitute

but zero residue contact/electronic spray can is The Right Thing.

Using contact cleaner in a spray can works best because

the spray pressure will chase water out of small components.

The key to using a hair dryer or heat gun is to put it on low.

Warm...low....no heat, just blow room temp....whatever

your favorite tool has settings called like that. Low temperature

is the key. I let it blow for a full day. Or many hours.

Some people say no heat gun/ hairdryer because they're

afraid you'll melt the solder or wire insulation and do

additional damage. Well, I've got news for them.

I use precision of judgment and I do not fry my

delicate electronics under a 650 degree heat gun

set on high. And I'll bet you can pull it off too.

Status:

open