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Current version by: rdklinc ,

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You will laugh, but for opening a lot of electronics, I have used the metal covers that fill the opening to PCI slots of desktop PCs. They have a nice thin flat end about 3/4" wide that nicely fits into small spaces, they are generally made of pretty strong metal that does not easily bend, and they are long enough that you can get a good grip on them while prying. Of course, they don't have a soft edge, so care must be taken to avoid scratching plastic.
 
On a side note, my favorite tool of all time is the Tweezerman tweezer -- these can be found in higher-end beauty supply stores, and there are a few different sizes (super pointy, flat end, etc.) They are more expensive than cheap tweezers, but after a few moments of use you will realize why they are infinitely better. They are by far the most precise tweezers in existence, and I use them for countless functions such as picking up screws, holding aside small cables, etc. The handle end of the tweezers is also great for prying. Typically when fixing just about any Apple product, I'll have my tweezers in my left hand and a screwdriver in my right.
 
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Original post by: rdklinc ,

Text:

You will laugh, but for opening a lot of electronics, I have used the metal covers that fill the opening to PCI slots of desktop PCs.  They have a nice thin flat end about 3/4" wide that nicely fits into small spaces, they are generally made of pretty strong metal that does not easily bend, and they are long enough that you can get a good grip on them while prying.  Of course, they don't have a soft edge, so care must be taken to avoid scratching plastic.

On a side note, my favorite tool of all time is the Tweezerman tweezer -- these can be found in higher-end beauty supply stores, and there are a few different sizes (super pointy, flat end, etc.)  They are more expensive than cheap tweezers, but after a few moments of use you will realize why they are infinitely better.  They are by far the most precise tweezers in existence, and I use them for countless functions such as picking up screws, holding aside small cables, etc.  The handle end of the tweezers is also great for prying.  Typically when fixing just about any Apple product, I'll have my tweezers in my left hand and a screwdriver in my right.

Status:

open