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Current version by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @jargs ,
What is the make and model number of the fan?
-Post an image of the capacitor in question.
+Post an image of the capacitor in question showing the markings and the wiring etc.
Here's how to do this on iFixit [guide|21499].
Are the two white wires joined together or even the terminals they're connected to, are they joined together? It may be that they are just in multiple connection for the supply in the fan.
Disconnect the wires from the capacitor and then use an Ohmmeter to test between the capacitor terminals where the two white wires were connected and check if they are short circuit.
Also some DMMs (digital multimeter) have a capacitance test function which you may be able to use to test the 4uF capacitor (if the meter’s capacitance test range is this high). Discharge the capacitor first before testing i.e. short out the red wire terminal to the white wire terminal (or both?) for a few seconds.
The 4uF is necessary to get the correct current (i.e. therefore speed) for the fan.
Also don’t assume that the red is the hot wire. In some places the white wire is the active wire in electrical appliance wiring. ;-)

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @jargs ,
What is the make and model number of the fan?
Post an image of the capacitor in question.
Here's how to do this on iFixit [guide|21499].
Are the two white wires joined together or even the terminals they're connected to, are they joined together? It may be that they are just in multiple connection for the supply in the fan.
Disconnect the wires from the capacitor and then use an Ohmmeter to test between the capacitor terminals where the two white wires were connected and check if they are short circuit.
-Also some DMMs (digital multimeter) have a capacitance test function which you may be able to use to test the 4uF capacitor (if the meter’s capacitance test range is this high). Discharge the capacitor first before testing i.e. short out the ref wire terminal to the white wire terminal (or both?) for a few seconds.
+Also some DMMs (digital multimeter) have a capacitance test function which you may be able to use to test the 4uF capacitor (if the meter’s capacitance test range is this high). Discharge the capacitor first before testing i.e. short out the red wire terminal to the white wire terminal (or both?) for a few seconds.
The 4uF is necessary to get the correct current (i.e. therefore speed) for the fan.
Also don’t assume that the red is the hot wire. In some places the white wire is the active wire in electrical appliance wiring. ;-)

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @jargs ,
What is the make and model number of the fan?
Post an image of the capacitor in question.
Here's how to do this on iFixit [guide|21499].
Are the two white wires joined together or even the terminals they're connected to, are they joined together? It may be that they are just in multiple connection for the supply in the fan.
Disconnect the wires from the capacitor and then use an Ohmmeter to test between the capacitor terminals where the two white wires were connected and check if they are short circuit.
Also some DMMs (digital multimeter) have a capacitance test function which you may be able to use to test the 4uF capacitor (if the meter’s capacitance test range is this high). Discharge the capacitor first before testing i.e. short out the ref wire terminal to the white wire terminal (or both?) for a few seconds.
The 4uF is necessary to get the correct current (i.e. therefore speed) for the fan.
+
+Also don’t assume that the red is the hot wire. In some places the white wire is the active wire in electrical appliance wiring. ;-)

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @jargs ,
What is the make and model number of the fan?
Post an image of the capacitor in question.
Here's how to do this on iFixit [guide|21499].
Are the two white wires joined together or even the terminals they're connected to, are they joined together? It may be that they are just in multiple connection for the supply in the fan.
-Disconnect the wires from the capacitor and then use an Ohmmeter to test between the capacitor terminals where the two white wires were connected and check if they are short circuit
+Disconnect the wires from the capacitor and then use an Ohmmeter to test between the capacitor terminals where the two white wires were connected and check if they are short circuit.
+
+Also some DMMs (digital multimeter) have a capacitance test function which you may be able to use to test the 4uF capacitor (if the meter’s capacitance test range is this high). Discharge the capacitor first before testing i.e. short out the ref wire terminal to the white wire terminal (or both?) for a few seconds.
The 4uF is necessary to get the correct current (i.e. therefore speed) for the fan.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @jargs ,
-What is the make and model number of the fan
+What is the make and model number of the fan?
Post an image of the capacitor in question.
Here's how to do this on iFixit [guide|21499].
Are the two white wires joined together or even the terminals they're connected to, are they joined together? It may be that they are just in multiple connection for the supply in the fan.
Disconnect the wires from the capacitor and then use an Ohmmeter to test between the capacitor terminals where the two white wires were connected and check if they are short circuit
The 4uF is necessary to get the correct current (i.e. therefore speed) for the fan.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @jargs ,
+
+What is the make and model number of the fan
Post an image of the capacitor in question.
Here's how to do this on iFixit [guide|21499].
Are the two white wires joined together or even the terminals they're connected to, are they joined together? It may be that they are just in multiple connection for the supply in the fan.
Disconnect the wires from the capacitor and then use an Ohmmeter to test between the capacitor terminals where the two white wires were connected and check if they are short circuit
-Sometimes assuming that red is the hot may not be true. In some places white is the hot wire and if this is the case the red may be the operate wire
-
-Can you trace the wires to the motor and to the controls to see what goes where? If the red goes to the motor and the whites go back to the board and other parts of the fan then it may be as I suggest.
-
The 4uF is necessary to get the correct current (i.e. therefore speed) for the fan.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @jargs ,
Post an image of the capacitor in question.
Here's how to do this on iFixit [guide|21499].
Are the two white wires joined together or even the terminals they're connected to, are they joined together? It may be that they are just in multiple connection for the supply in the fan.
Disconnect the wires from the capacitor and then use an Ohmmeter to test between the capacitor terminals where the two white wires were connected and check if they are short circuit
-Sometimes assuming that red is the hot may not be true. In some places white is the hot wire and in this case the red may be the operate wire
+Sometimes assuming that red is the hot may not be true. In some places white is the hot wire and if this is the case the red may be the operate wire
Can you trace the wires to the motor and to the controls to see what goes where? If the red goes to the motor and the whites go back to the board and other parts of the fan then it may be as I suggest.
The 4uF is necessary to get the correct current (i.e. therefore speed) for the fan.

Status:

open

Original post by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @jargs ,

Post an image of the capacitor in question.

Here's how to do this on iFixit [guide|21499].

Are the two white wires joined together or even the terminals they're connected to, are they joined together? It may be that they are just in multiple connection for the supply in the fan.

Disconnect the wires from the capacitor and then use an Ohmmeter to test between the capacitor terminals where the two white wires were connected and check if they are short circuit

Sometimes assuming that red is the hot may not be true. In some places white is the hot wire and in this case the red may be the  operate wire

Can you trace the wires to the motor and to the controls to see what goes where? If the red goes to the motor and the whites go back to the board and other parts of the fan then it may be as I suggest.

The 4uF is necessary to get the correct current (i.e. therefore speed) for the fan.

Status:

open