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Current version by: adlerpe ,

Text:

There are three different 2009 generations in MacBooks:
 
# A1181 Early 2009 MacBook/EMC 2300: 2GHz, FireWire400 port, removable battery
# A1181 Mid 2009 MacBook/EMC 2330: 2.13GHz, FireWire400 port, removable battery
# A1342 Late 2009 MacBook (Unibody)/EMC 2350: 2.26GHz, USB ports only, '''non'''-removable battery

If
If your friend’s battery can’t be removed from the bottom case without unscrewing the whole bottom plate, and yours '''can''' be removed by sticking a coin or a screwdriver in the slot in the round spacespace next to the battery, then you have two different designs. You can also identify the computers by the EMC number, which is printed in very tiny letters on the bottom case behind the hinge, along with the model number.

If
If your friend’s battery can’t be removed from the bottom case without unscrewing the whole bottom plate, and yours '''can''' be removed by sticking a coin or a screwdriver in the slot in the round spacespace next to the battery, then you have two different designs. You can also identify the computers by the EMC number, which is printed in very tiny letters on the bottom case behind the hinge, along with the model number.
 
The later A1342 Unibody MacBooks (2009-2010) can take OSes as late as 10.13.x High Sierra. The earlier A1181 MacBooks (2006-2009) have a number of different cutoff points, depending on the generation; 10.6/Snow Leopard for the 2006 first generation, 10.7/Lion for the five Late 2006-Late 2008 generations, 10.11/El Capitan for the two 2009 generations. It would be helpful to update the model information up top as soon as you’ve checked the generation, so we’re giving answers to address your computer.
 
You can check to see what version of the operating system is on your original hard drive by mounting itthat drive as an external drive through USB, using an adapter or a 2.5” SATA enclosure. It will be a lot easier to come up with a solution if you’re clear on which OS you’re starting from.
You can check to see what version of the operating system is on your original hard drive by mounting itthat drive as an external drive through USB, using an adapter or a 2.5” SATA enclosure. It will be a lot easier to come up with a solution if you’re clear on which OS you’re starting from.
 
When you say you copied“copied” a drive, I’m not clear whether your friend copied your old hard drive to the new SSD, or whether they copied ''their'' drive to your SSD. If the OS on their MacBook is too new for your''your'' MacBook, then your MacBook just won’t boot without a lot of extra tweaking. Assuming your old internal hard drive still works, your friend could:
When you say you copied“copied” a drive, I’m not clear whether your friend copied your old hard drive to the new SSD, or whether they copied ''their'' drive to your SSD. If the OS on their MacBook is too new for your''your'' MacBook, then your MacBook just won’t boot without a lot of extra tweaking. Assuming your old internal hard drive still works, your friend could:
 
# mount the old drive and the new SSD as external drives
# reformat the SSD as a normal bootable drive (GUID partition map, OSX Extended Journaled format)
# then clone the contents of your old drive to the SSD using Disk Utility, or a utility like [https://bombich.com/download|Carbon Copy Cloner] or [https://shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html|SuperDuper!].
 
In this scenario, your friend’s computer is just a tool to move the data from one drive to the other - it doesn’t alter the data or the operating system.
 
If it turns out that the OS on the SSD is compatible with your computer, then I would try replacing the internal SATA ribbon cable that connects your hard drive (replacement SSD) to your logic board. After years of getting knocked around, the cable can get damaged; SSDs are more sensitive to I/O problems introduced by a damaged cable. Normally I wouldn’t post a link to a replacement part without knowing the generation, but fortunately, all A1181 MacBooks use the same data cable: [product|IF186-018-2]

Status:

open

Original post by: adlerpe ,

Text:

There are three different 2009 generations in MacBooks:

# A1181 Early 2009 MacBook/EMC 2300: 2GHz, FireWire400 port, removable battery
# A1181 Mid 2009 MacBook/EMC 2330: 2.13GHz, FireWire400 port, removable battery
# A1342 Late 2009 MacBook (Unibody)/EMC 2350: 2.26GHz, USB ports only, '''non'''-removable battery

If your friend’s battery can’t be removed from the bottom case without unscrewing the whole bottom plate, and yours '''can''' be removed by sticking a coin or a screwdriver in the slot in the round space, then you have two different designs. You can also identify the computers by the EMC number, which is printed in very tiny letters on the bottom case behind the hinge, along with the model number.

The later A1342 Unibody MacBooks (2009-2010) can take OSes as late as 10.13.x High Sierra. The earlier A1181 MacBooks (2006-2009) have a number of different cutoff points, depending on the generation; 10.6/Snow Leopard for the 2006 first generation, 10.7/Lion for the five Late 2006-Late 2008 generations, 10.11/El Capitan for the two 2009 generations. It would be helpful to update the model information up top as soon as you’ve checked the generation, so we’re giving answers to address your computer.

You can check to see what version of the operating system is on your original hard drive by mounting it as an external drive through USB, using an adapter or a 2.5” SATA enclosure. It will be a lot easier to come up with a solution if you’re clear on which OS you’re starting from.

When you say you copied a drive, I’m not clear whether your friend copied your old hard drive to the new SSD, or whether they copied ''their'' drive to your SSD. If the OS on their MacBook is too new for your MacBook, then your MacBook just won’t boot without a lot of extra tweaking. Assuming your old internal hard drive still works, your friend could:

# mount the old drive and the new SSD as external drives
# reformat the SSD as a normal bootable drive (GUID partition map, OSX Extended Journaled format)
# then clone the contents of your old drive to the SSD using Disk Utility, or a utility like [https://bombich.com/download|Carbon Copy Cloner] or [https://shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html|SuperDuper!].

In this scenario, your friend’s computer is just a tool to move the data from one drive to the other - it doesn’t alter the data or the operating system.

If it turns out that the OS on the SSD is compatible with your computer, then I would try replacing the internal SATA ribbon cable that connects your hard drive (replacement SSD) to your logic board. After years of getting knocked around, the cable can get damaged; SSDs are more sensitive to I/O problems introduced by a damaged cable. Normally I wouldn’t post a link to a replacement part without knowing the generation, but fortunately, all A1181 MacBooks use the same data cable: [product|IF186-018-2]

Status:

open