Skip to main content

Fix Your Stuff

Right to Repair

Store

Help

Current version by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi, [br]
 
 
If possible, it is always worthwhile to at least attempt to repair anything.
 
Not only is there the satisfaction of having done so, if successful, it means that in this case for a while at least it won’t add to the ever growing mountains of e-waste.
 
The resultant power surge that may have occurred when the power was reconnected after the outage could have burnt out components in the scanner,
 
Here’s a link to the ifixit [guide|22547] guide. This should be of some help in opening the scanner to initially do a visual inspection to see if there is any obvious physicalelectrical damage to the electronic components, such as burnt out surge suppressors, blown capacitors and blown fuses etc.
Here’s a link to the ifixit [guide|22547] guide. This should be of some help in opening the scanner to initially do a visual inspection to see if there is any obvious physicalelectrical damage to the electronic components, such as burnt out surge suppressors, blown capacitors and blown fuses etc.
 
If you do see something (or even if you don’t) and are unsure, take some close up pictures of the circuit board and post them back here.
 
Here’s how to do this.
 
[guide|21499]

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi, [br]
 
 
If possible, it is always worthwhile to at least attempt to repair anything.
 
Not only is there the satisfaction of having done so, if successful, it means that in this case for a while at least it won’t add to the ever growing mountains of e-waste.
 
The resultant power surge that may have occurred when the power was reconnected after the outage could have burnt out components in the scanner,
 
Here’s a link to the ifixit [guide|22547] guide. This should be of some help in opening the scanner to initially do a visual inspection to see if there is any obvious physical damage to the electronic components, such as burnt out surge suppressors, blown capacitors and blown fuses etc.
Here’s a link to the ifixit [guide|22547] guide. This should be of some help in opening the scanner to initially do a visual inspection to see if there is any obvious physical damage to the electronic components, such as burnt out surge suppressors, blown capacitors and blown fuses etc.
 
If you do see something (or even if you don’t) and are unsure, take some close up pictures of the circuit board and post them back here.
 
Here’s how to do this.
 
[guide|21499]

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi, [br]
 
 
If possible, it is always worthwhile to at least attempt to repair anything.
 
Not only is there the satisfaction of having done so, if successful, it means that in this case for a while at least it won’t add to the ever growing mountains of e-waste.
 
The resultant power surge that may have occurred when the power was reconnected after the outage could have burnt out components in the scanner,
The resultant power surge that may have occurred when the power was reconnected after the outage could have burnt out components in the scanner,
 
Here’s a link to the ifixit [guide|22547] guide. This should be of some help in opening the scanner to do a visual inspection to see if there is any obvious physical damage to the electronic components, such as burnt out surge suppressors, blown capacitors and blown fuses etc.
 
If you do see something (or even if you don’t) and are unsure, take some close up pictures of the circuit board and post them back here.
 
Here’s how to do this.
 
[guide|21499]

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi, [br]
 
 
If possible, it is always worthwhile to at least attempt to repair anything.
 
Not only is there the satisfaction of having done so, if successful, it means that in this case for a while at least it won’t add to the ever growing mountains of e-waste.
 
The resultant power surge that may have occurred when the power was reconnected could have burnt out components in the scanner,
 
Here’s a link to the ifixit [guide|22547] guide. This should be of some help in opening the scanner to do a visual inspection to see if there is any obvious physical damage to the electronic components, such as burnt out surge suppressors, blown capacitors and blown fuses etc.
 
If you do see something (or even if you don’t) and are unsure, take some close up pictures of the circuit board and post them back here and hopefully someone will help youhere.
If you do see something (or even if you don’t) and are unsure, take some close up pictures of the circuit board and post them back here and hopefully someone will help youhere.
 
Here’s how to do this.
 
[guide|21499]

Status:

open

Original post by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi, [br]

If possible, it is always worthwhile to at least attempt to repair anything.

Not only is there the satisfaction of having done so, if successful, it means that in this case for a while at least it won’t add to the ever growing mountains of e-waste.

The resultant power surge that may have occurred when the power was reconnected could have burnt out components in the scanner,

Here’s a link to the ifixit [guide|22547]  guide. This should be of some help in opening the scanner to do a visual inspection to see if there is any obvious physical damage to the electronic components, such as burnt out surge suppressors, blown capacitors and blown fuses etc.

If you do see something (or even if you don’t) and are unsure, take some close up pictures of the circuit board and post them back here and hopefully someone will help you.

Here’s how to do this.

[guide|21499]

Status:

open