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Current version by: oldturkey03 ,

Text:

'''Carlos Ferrari'''  totall y agree with @arbaman on the 2011 is absolutely commonly caused by the GPU chip itself. The processor is a flip chip design and the issue is commonly caused by the solder bumps between the IC and the substrate. The key to this is the design of the processor which is a flip chip design. The proper definition of that can be found at Wikipedia "is a method for interconnecting semiconductor devices, such as IC chips and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), to external circuitry with solder bumps that have been deposited onto the chip pads." So what happens is that the chip heats up (due to poor design of the ventilation and heatsinks. It does not matter if it is a MBP a PS3 or a XBox) and the bumps that connect the chip to the substrate lose contact and your chip (in this case processor) fails.
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-[image|581899]
[image|765994]
As you can see the "bumps" are what actually connects the die to the substrate to make the chip complete. If these bumps fail, the die does no longer make contact with the substrate and thus no contact with the circuit board. The chip has failed.
[image|765995]
Here you can see the space where the bump has failed and no longer makes contact. We are talking microns of space here.
Sometimes a bit of pressure on the top of the die potentially close the gap. Same with a reflow, which may allow some of material from the bump to reshape and starting to make contact again. The heating of cooling of the chip during use is what will eventually cause it to fail again.
If you are going to do a reflow then the general guidelines for a good profile would be something like this:
Temperature ramp up 1ºC/second
Peak temperature should be 200C to 210C
Remain above liquidus (183C) for 45-75seconds
Do not heat any packages above 220C since this will most likely destroy the IC
Here is a good document that will help you with the profile as well. [document|2353]
This is not an answer just a quick and dirty explanation of what has commonly affected the flip chip designed GPU

Status:

open

Original post by: oldturkey03 ,

Text:

'''Carlos Ferrari'''   totall y agree with @arbaman on the 2011 is absolutely commonly caused by the GPU chip itself. The processor is a flip chip design and the issue is commonly caused by the solder bumps between the IC and the substrate.  The key to this is the design of the processor which is a flip chip design. The proper definition of that can be found at Wikipedia "is a method for interconnecting semiconductor devices, such as IC chips and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), to external circuitry with solder bumps that have been deposited onto the chip pads." So what happens is that the chip heats up (due to poor design of the ventilation and heatsinks. It does not matter if it is a MBP a PS3 or a XBox) and the bumps that connect the chip to the substrate lose contact and your chip (in this case processor) fails.

[image|581899]

[image|765994]

As you can see the "bumps" are what actually connects the die to the substrate to make the chip complete. If these bumps fail, the die does no longer make contact with the substrate and thus no contact with the circuit board. The chip has failed.

[image|765995]

Here you can see the space where the bump has failed and no longer makes contact. We are talking microns of space here.

Sometimes  a bit of pressure on the top of the die potentially close the gap. Same with a reflow, which may allow some of material from the bump to reshape and starting to make contact again. The heating of cooling of the chip during use is what will eventually cause it to fail again.

If you are going to do a reflow then the general guidelines for a good profile would be something like this:

Temperature ramp up 1ºC/second

Peak temperature should be 200C to 210C

Remain above liquidus (183C) for 45-75seconds

Do not heat any packages above 220C since this will most likely destroy the IC

Here is a good document that will help you with the profile as well. [document|2353]

This is not an answer just a quick and dirty explanation of what has commonly affected the flip chip designed GPU

Status:

open