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Current version by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @brazenandbold ,
 
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter) you could use its’ Ohmmeter function to perform some initial tests to try to localise where the problem is.
 
With the blender ''disconnected from the power supply'', place the meter’s test probes across the two pins of the blender’s power cable plug and check if the meter shows a reading. You can try it with the blender’s Power On switch operated as well.
With the blender ''disconnected from the power supply'', place the meter’s test probes across the two pins of the blender’s power cable plug and check if the meter shows a reading. You can try it with the blender’s Power On switch operated as well.
 
If there is a reading then this proves the power plug and the cord are OK.
 
If there is no reading then you may have to open the blender and prove the wiring between the plug and the connection in the blender where the power cable is terminated, to prove which wire may be faulty etc.
 
The blender will most probably have to be opened in any case whether you have proved that the power cord is OK or to find out why it is not.
 
Here’s a link to the ifixit [[Topic:Ninja Mega Kitchen System BL770]] guide, which may be of some help.
 
Once the blender has been opened, it can be inspected for any obvious problems such as burnt out or heat stressed components. Looking at an image of the motherboard from the guide there doesn’t appear to be any fuses in the blender so that rules that possible cause out.
 
As stated, these are only the initial steps, after that it may come down to doing point to point testing of the circuit or testing of individual components, which, with out a schematic diagram (I can’t find one online) won’t be easy.
 
if there any components that you are not sure of, post some close up pictures back here and hopefully someone will be able to help. Here’s how to do this. https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Adding+images+to+an+existing+question/21499[guide|21499]
if there any components that you are not sure of, post some close up pictures back here and hopefully someone will be able to help. Here’s how to do this. https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Adding+images+to+an+existing+question/21499[guide|21499]

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @brazenandbold ,
 
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter) you could use its’ Ohmmeter function to perform some initial tests to try to localise where the problem is.
 
With the blender ''disconnected from the power supply'', place the meter’s test probes across the two pins of the blender’s power cable plug and check if the meter shows a reading. You can try it with the blender’s Power On switch operated as well.
 
If there is a reading then this proves the power plug and the cord are OK.
 
If there is no reading then you may have to open the blender and prove the wiring between the plug and the connection in the blender where the power cable is terminated, to prove which wire may be faulty etc.
 
The blender will most probably have to be opened in any case whether you have proved that the power cord is OK or to find out why it is not.
 
Here’s a link to the ifixit [[Topic:Ninja Mega Kitchen System BL770]] guide, which may be of some help.
 
Once the blender has been opened, it can be inspected for any obvious problems such as burnt out or heat stressed components. Looking at an image of the motherboard from the guide there doesn’t appear to be any fuses in the blender so that rules that possible cause out.
 
As stated, these are only the initial steps, after that it may come down to doing point to point testing of the circuit or testing of individual components, which, with out a schematic diagram (I can’t find one online) won’t be easy.
 
if there any components that you are not sure of, post some close up pictures back here and hopefully someone will be able to help. Here’s how to do this. https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Adding+images+to+an+existing+question/21499

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @brazenandbold ,
 
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter) you could use its’ Ohmmeter function to perform some initial tests to try to localise where the problem is.
 
With the blender ''disconnected from the power supply'', place the meter’s test probes across the two pins of the blender’s power cable plug and check if the meter shows a reading. You can try it with the blender’s Power On switch operated as well.
 
If there is a reading then this proves the power plug and the cord are OK.
 
If there is no reading then you may have to open the blender and prove the wiring between the plug and the connection in the blender where the power cable is terminated, to prove which wire may be faulty etc.
 
The blender will most probably have to be opened in any case whether you have proved that the power cord is OK or to find out why it is not.
 
Here’s a link to the ifixit [[Topic:Ninja Mega Kitchen System BL770]] guide, which may be of some help.
 
Once the blender has been opened, it can be inspected for any obvious problems such as burnt out or heat stressed components. Looking at an image of the motherboard image from the guide there doesn’t appear to be any fuses in the blender so that rules that possible cause out.
Once the blender has been opened, it can be inspected for any obvious problems such as burnt out or heat stressed components. Looking at an image of the motherboard image from the guide there doesn’t appear to be any fuses in the blender so that rules that possible cause out.
 
As stated, these are only the initial steps, after that it may come down to doing point to point testing of the circuit or testing of individual components, which, with out a schematic diagram (I can’t find one online) won’t be easy.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @brazenandbold ,
 
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter) you could use its’ Ohmmeter function to perform some initial tests to try to localise where the problem is.
 
With the blender ''disconnected from the power supply'', place the meter’s test probes across the two pins of the blender’s power cable plug and check if the meter shows a reading. You can try it with the blender’s Power On switch operated as well.
 
If there is a reading then this proves the power plug and the cord are OK.
 
If there is no reading then you may have to open the blender and prove the wiring between the plug and the connection in the blender where the power cable is terminated, to prove which wire may be faulty etc.
 
The blender will most probably have to be opened in any case whether you have proved that the power cord is OK or to find out ifwhy it is not.
The blender will most probably have to be opened in any case whether you have proved that the power cord is OK or to find out ifwhy it is not.
 
Here’s a link to the ifixit [[Topic:Ninja Mega Kitchen System BL770]] guide, which may be of some help.
 
Once the blender has been opened, it can be inspected for any obvious problems such as burnt out or heat stressed components. Looking at the motherboard image from the guide there doesn’t appear to be any fuses in the blender so that rules that possible cause out.
 
As stated, these are only the initial steps, after that it may come down to doing point to point testing of the circuit or testing of individual components, which, with out a schematic diagram (I can’t find one online) won’t be easy.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @brazenandbold ,
 
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter) you could use its’ Ohmmeter function to perform some initial tests to try to localise where the problem is.
 
With the blender ''disconnected from the power supply'', place the meter’s test probes across the two pins of the blender’s power cable plug and check if the meter shows a reading. You can try it with the blender’s Power On switch operated as well.
With the blender ''disconnected from the power supply'', place the meter’s test probes across the two pins of the blender’s power cable plug and check if the meter shows a reading. You can try it with the blender’s Power On switch operated as well.
 
If there is a reading then this proves the power plug and the cord are OK.
 
If there is no reading then you may have to open the blender and prove the wiring between the plug and the connection in the blender where the power cable is terminated, to prove which wire may be faulty etc.
 
The blender will most probably have to be opened in any case whether you have proved that the power cord is OK or to find out if it is not.
 
Here’s a link to the ifixit [[Topic:Ninja Mega Kitchen System BL770]] guide, which may be of some help.
 
Once the blender has been opened, it can be inspected for any obvious problems such as burnt out or heat stressed components. Looking at the motherboard image from the guide there doesn’t appear to be any fuses in the blender so that rules that possible cause out.
 
As stated, these are only the initial steps, after that it may come down to doing point to point testing of the circuit or testing of individual components, which, with out a schematic diagram (I can’t find one online) won’t be easy.

Status:

open

Original post by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @brazenandbold ,

If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter) you could use its’ Ohmmeter function to perform some initial tests to try to localise where the problem is.

With the blender ''disconnected from the power supply'', place the meter’s test probes across the two pins of the power cable plug and check if the meter shows a reading. You can try it with the blender’s Power On switch operated as well.

If there is a reading then this proves the power plug and the cord are OK.

If there is no reading then you may have to open the blender and prove the wiring between the plug and the connection in the blender where the power cable is terminated, to prove which wire may be faulty etc.

The blender will most probably have to be opened in any case whether you have proved that the power cord is OK or to find out if it is not.

Here’s a link to the ifixit [[Topic:Ninja Mega Kitchen System BL770]] guide, which may be of some help.

Once the blender has been opened, it can be inspected for any obvious problems such as burnt out or heat stressed components. Looking at the motherboard image from the guide there doesn’t appear to be any fuses in the blender so that rules that possible cause out.

As stated, these are only the initial steps, after that it may come down to doing point to point testing of the circuit or testing of individual components, which, with out a schematic diagram (I can’t find one online) won’t be easy.

Status:

open