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Current version by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,
Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.
(Remove battery before connecting charger)
If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.
When it has shutdown completely, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop
=== Update (03/28/2017) ===
Hi @kathyb70 ,
First, never ever say that you're a "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You have the intelligence to ask for help, (a lot apparently don't, misplaced pride perhaps, I don't know) so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
-For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, you just missed what was causing it to light up., but with a slight nudge you worked out what was happening or rather what was not happening. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
+For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, you just missed what was causing it to light up, but with a slight nudge you worked out what was happening or rather what was not happening. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
It could be that the battery is too low (due to a faulty charger perhaps- unproven as yet) to start/maintain the laptop running and that if the charger output is faulty then obviously the laptop won't start /run either.
It could also be a faulty DC-In socket on the laptop, not allowing the charger to charge the battery or run the laptop. Use a strong light and a magnifying glass to visually inspect the socket to ensure that it appears to be OK with no bent or even missing centre pin and that it doesn't feel loose when you plug the charger into it, (the charger does not have to be connected to the wall outlet to do this). Try ''gently'' (stress'' gently'') moving the charger plug from side to side when it is plugged into the socket to "feel" if the socket moves at all.
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter - adequate ones are available at larger hardware stores for $10) you can use its' Voltmeter function to test the DC output voltage of the charger. Simply set the Voltmeter to the appropriate DC Volts range (start at highest range if unsure) then connect the test leads directly across the inner and outer charger plug connections (plug that connects into the laptop - it is not plugged into the laptop to do the test) plug the charger power cord into the wall outlet and switch on the charger and read the charger's output Voltage level. It should correspond to what is written on the charger case as the DC Output Voltage.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,
Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.
(Remove battery before connecting charger)
If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.
When it has shutdown completely, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop
=== Update (03/28/2017) ===
Hi @kathyb70 ,
First, never ever say that you're a "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You have the intelligence to ask for help, (a lot apparently don't, misplaced pride perhaps, I don't know) so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
-For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, you just missed what was causing it to light up. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
+For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, you just missed what was causing it to light up., but with a slight nudge you worked out what was happening or rather what was not happening. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
It could be that the battery is too low (due to a faulty charger perhaps- unproven as yet) to start/maintain the laptop running and that if the charger output is faulty then obviously the laptop won't start /run either.
It could also be a faulty DC-In socket on the laptop, not allowing the charger to charge the battery or run the laptop. Use a strong light and a magnifying glass to visually inspect the socket to ensure that it appears to be OK with no bent or even missing centre pin and that it doesn't feel loose when you plug the charger into it, (the charger does not have to be connected to the wall outlet to do this). Try ''gently'' (stress'' gently'') moving the charger plug from side to side when it is plugged into the socket to "feel" if the socket moves at all.
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter - adequate ones are available at larger hardware stores for $10) you can use its' Voltmeter function to test the DC output voltage of the charger. Simply set the Voltmeter to the appropriate DC Volts range (start at highest range if unsure) then connect the test leads directly across the inner and outer charger plug connections (plug that connects into the laptop - it is not plugged into the laptop to do the test) plug the charger power cord into the wall outlet and switch on the charger and read the charger's output Voltage level. It should correspond to what is written on the charger case as the DC Output Voltage.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,
Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.
(Remove battery before connecting charger)
If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.
When it has shutdown completely, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop
=== Update (03/28/2017) ===
Hi @kathyb70 ,
First, never ever say that you're a "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You have the intelligence to ask for help, (a lot apparently don't, misplaced pride perhaps, I don't know) so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
-For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, just what was causing it to light. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
+For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, you just missed what was causing it to light up. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
It could be that the battery is too low (due to a faulty charger perhaps- unproven as yet) to start/maintain the laptop running and that if the charger output is faulty then obviously the laptop won't start /run either.
It could also be a faulty DC-In socket on the laptop, not allowing the charger to charge the battery or run the laptop. Use a strong light and a magnifying glass to visually inspect the socket to ensure that it appears to be OK with no bent or even missing centre pin and that it doesn't feel loose when you plug the charger into it, (the charger does not have to be connected to the wall outlet to do this). Try ''gently'' (stress'' gently'') moving the charger plug from side to side when it is plugged into the socket to "feel" if the socket moves at all.
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter - adequate ones are available at larger hardware stores for $10) you can use its' Voltmeter function to test the DC output voltage of the charger. Simply set the Voltmeter to the appropriate DC Volts range (start at highest range if unsure) then connect the test leads directly across the inner and outer charger plug connections (plug that connects into the laptop - it is not plugged into the laptop to do the test) plug the charger power cord into the wall outlet and switch on the charger and read the charger's output Voltage level. It should correspond to what is written on the charger case as the DC Output Voltage.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,
Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.
(Remove battery before connecting charger)
If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.
When it has shutdown completely, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop
=== Update (03/28/2017) ===
Hi @kathyb70 ,
First, never ever say that you're a "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You have the intelligence to ask for help, (a lot apparently don't, misplaced pride perhaps, I don't know) so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, just what was causing it to light. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
It could be that the battery is too low (due to a faulty charger perhaps- unproven as yet) to start/maintain the laptop running and that if the charger output is faulty then obviously the laptop won't start /run either.
-It could also be a faulty DC-In socket on the laptop. Use a strong light and a magnifying glass to visually inspect the socket to ensure that it appears to be OK with no bent or even missing centre pin and that it doesn't feel loose when you plug the charger into it, (the charger does not have to be connected to the wall outlet to do this). Try ''gently'' (stress'' gently'') moving the charger plug from side to side when it is plugged into the socket to "feel" if the socket moves at all.
+It could also be a faulty DC-In socket on the laptop, not allowing the charger to charge the battery or run the laptop. Use a strong light and a magnifying glass to visually inspect the socket to ensure that it appears to be OK with no bent or even missing centre pin and that it doesn't feel loose when you plug the charger into it, (the charger does not have to be connected to the wall outlet to do this). Try ''gently'' (stress'' gently'') moving the charger plug from side to side when it is plugged into the socket to "feel" if the socket moves at all.
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter - adequate ones are available at larger hardware stores for $10) you can use its' Voltmeter function to test the DC output voltage of the charger. Simply set the Voltmeter to the appropriate DC Volts range (start at highest range if unsure) then connect the test leads directly across the inner and outer charger plug connections (plug that connects into the laptop - it is not plugged into the laptop to do the test) plug the charger power cord into the wall outlet and switch on the charger and read the charger's output Voltage level. It should correspond to what is written on the charger case as the DC Output Voltage.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,
Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.
(Remove battery before connecting charger)
If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.
When it has shutdown completely, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop
=== Update (03/28/2017) ===
Hi @kathyb70 ,
-First, never ever say "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You have the intelligence to ask for help, (a lot apparently don't, misplaced pride perhaps, I don't know) so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
+First, never ever say that you're a "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You have the intelligence to ask for help, (a lot apparently don't, misplaced pride perhaps, I don't know) so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, just what was causing it to light. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
It could be that the battery is too low (due to a faulty charger perhaps- unproven as yet) to start/maintain the laptop running and that if the charger output is faulty then obviously the laptop won't start /run either.
It could also be a faulty DC-In socket on the laptop. Use a strong light and a magnifying glass to visually inspect the socket to ensure that it appears to be OK with no bent or even missing centre pin and that it doesn't feel loose when you plug the charger into it, (the charger does not have to be connected to the wall outlet to do this). Try ''gently'' (stress'' gently'') moving the charger plug from side to side when it is plugged into the socket to "feel" if the socket moves at all.
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter - adequate ones are available at larger hardware stores for $10) you can use its' Voltmeter function to test the DC output voltage of the charger. Simply set the Voltmeter to the appropriate DC Volts range (start at highest range if unsure) then connect the test leads directly across the inner and outer charger plug connections (plug that connects into the laptop - it is not plugged into the laptop to do the test) plug the charger power cord into the wall outlet and switch on the charger and read the charger's output Voltage level. It should correspond to what is written on the charger case as the DC Output Voltage.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,
Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.
(Remove battery before connecting charger)
If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.
When it has shutdown completely, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop
=== Update (03/28/2017) ===
Hi @kathyb70 ,
-First, never ever say "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You have the intelligence to ask for help, (a lot apparently don't, pride perhaps, I don't know) so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
+First, never ever say "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You have the intelligence to ask for help, (a lot apparently don't, misplaced pride perhaps, I don't know) so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, just what was causing it to light. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
It could be that the battery is too low (due to a faulty charger perhaps- unproven as yet) to start/maintain the laptop running and that if the charger output is faulty then obviously the laptop won't start /run either.
It could also be a faulty DC-In socket on the laptop. Use a strong light and a magnifying glass to visually inspect the socket to ensure that it appears to be OK with no bent or even missing centre pin and that it doesn't feel loose when you plug the charger into it, (the charger does not have to be connected to the wall outlet to do this). Try ''gently'' (stress'' gently'') moving the charger plug from side to side when it is plugged into the socket to "feel" if the socket moves at all.
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter - adequate ones are available at larger hardware stores for $10) you can use its' Voltmeter function to test the DC output voltage of the charger. Simply set the Voltmeter to the appropriate DC Volts range (start at highest range if unsure) then connect the test leads directly across the inner and outer charger plug connections (plug that connects into the laptop - it is not plugged into the laptop to do the test) plug the charger power cord into the wall outlet and switch on the charger and read the charger's output Voltage level. It should correspond to what is written on the charger case as the DC Output Voltage.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,
Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.
(Remove battery before connecting charger)
If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.
When it has shutdown completely, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop
=== Update (03/28/2017) ===
Hi @kathyb70 ,
-First, never ever say "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You also have the intelligence to ask for help, so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
+First, never ever say "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You have the intelligence to ask for help, (a lot apparently don't, pride perhaps, I don't know) so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, just what was causing it to light. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
It could be that the battery is too low (due to a faulty charger perhaps- unproven as yet) to start/maintain the laptop running and that if the charger output is faulty then obviously the laptop won't start /run either.
It could also be a faulty DC-In socket on the laptop. Use a strong light and a magnifying glass to visually inspect the socket to ensure that it appears to be OK with no bent or even missing centre pin and that it doesn't feel loose when you plug the charger into it, (the charger does not have to be connected to the wall outlet to do this). Try ''gently'' (stress'' gently'') moving the charger plug from side to side when it is plugged into the socket to "feel" if the socket moves at all.
If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter - adequate ones are available at larger hardware stores for $10) you can use its' Voltmeter function to test the DC output voltage of the charger. Simply set the Voltmeter to the appropriate DC Volts range (start at highest range if unsure) then connect the test leads directly across the inner and outer charger plug connections (plug that connects into the laptop - it is not plugged into the laptop to do the test) plug the charger power cord into the wall outlet and switch on the charger and read the charger's output Voltage level. It should correspond to what is written on the charger case as the DC Output Voltage.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,
Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.
(Remove battery before connecting charger)
If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.
When it has shutdown completely, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop
+
+=== Update (03/28/2017) ===
+
+Hi @kathyb70 ,
+
+First, never ever say "dumb old woman'. Everyone overlooks things at sometime. You also have the intelligence to ask for help, so that you can carry on and hopefully fix the problem.
+
+For a start you didn't overlook that the light was there, just what was causing it to light. When you don't notice the light in the first place then worry about your eyes,
+
+It could be that the battery is too low (due to a faulty charger perhaps- unproven as yet) to start/maintain the laptop running and that if the charger output is faulty then obviously the laptop won't start /run either.
+
+It could also be a faulty DC-In socket on the laptop. Use a strong light and a magnifying glass to visually inspect the socket to ensure that it appears to be OK with no bent or even missing centre pin and that it doesn't feel loose when you plug the charger into it, (the charger does not have to be connected to the wall outlet to do this). Try ''gently'' (stress'' gently'') moving the charger plug from side to side when it is plugged into the socket to "feel" if the socket moves at all.
+
+If you have a DMM (Digital MultiMeter - adequate ones are available at larger hardware stores for $10) you can use its' Voltmeter function to test the DC output voltage of the charger. Simply set the Voltmeter to the appropriate DC Volts range (start at highest range if unsure) then connect the test leads directly across the inner and outer charger plug connections (plug that connects into the laptop - it is not plugged into the laptop to do the test) plug the charger power cord into the wall outlet and switch on the charger and read the charger's output Voltage level. It should correspond to what is written on the charger case as the DC Output Voltage.

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,
Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.
+
(Remove battery before connecting charger)
If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.
-When it has shutdown, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
+When it has shutdown completely, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop

Status:

open

Edit by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,
Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.
+(Remove battery before connecting charger)
If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.
When it has shutdown, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.
If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop

Status:

open

Original post by: jayeff ,

Text:

Hi @kathyb70 ,

Try starting it with the charger connected and on and the battery ''removed''.

If it starts OK let it boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down then shutdown the laptop in the normal way.

When it has shutdown, switch off the charger, reinsert the battery, switch on the charger, try to start the laptop again.

If it starts, allow it to boot all the way to the Windows desktop, allow the HDD activity to settle down, check the charge status of the battery and if charging allow it to fully charge before switching off the charger and disconnecting it from the laptop

Status:

open