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Current version by: Dan ,

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The process of upgrading the hardware in my 20" 2007 iMac is complete. I am running the latest beta of macOS 10.12.3(16D30a10.12.3 (16D30a). I have 802.11ac and bluetoothBluetooth 4.0 so I have full support for Continuity.
The process of upgrading the hardware in my 20" 2007 iMac is complete. I am running the latest beta of macOS 10.12.3(16D30a10.12.3 (16D30a). I have 802.11ac and bluetoothBluetooth 4.0 so I have full support for Continuity.
 
I.E. Handoff and Universal Clipboard.
 
First I'll start out the the processor swap. I was running the X7900 Core 2 Extreme for a long time.
 
== Specs X7900: ==
 
* Base frequency: 2.80GHz
* Cache: 4MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 44W
* Voltage range: 1.100-1.375
* Number of
* transistors: 291 million
* Does '''''NOT''''' support sse4.1 instructions
 
== GeekBench: ==
 
[image|1008358]
 
This was a good processor. I first installed it while using OS X Lion. Other than running a little hot it seemed to run OS X great until I got to OS X Yosemite. There I started to get beachballs and very jittery movements in animations. It wasn't so bad that I couldn't deal with it but I just assumed my time with the 2007 iMac was coming to an end. With the lack of support for macOS it was really starting to seem real. I just assumed that with an almost 10 year old iMac there wouldn't be any processors that would support sse4.1 and work in my iMac. I was wrong. Pretty much, there are 3 CPU's to choose from;
 
* T9300
* T9500
* X9000
 
Those are the only 3 that I found that support sse4.1 '''AND''' have an 800 FSB. That is because the 7,1 iMac only supports 800 FSB. Anything higher than that won't boot. I tried. I bought an E8135 for $6.00 on Ebay just to try out because it was so cheap. And the iMac wouldn't completely boot.
 
I decided to go with the T9300. It was $18 USD is pretty much what it came down to. All three of these processors have the same exact specs except for base frequency and also the X9000 TDP is 44W and not 35W like the other 2.
 
== Specs T9300: ==
 
* Base frequency: 2.50GHz
* Cache: 6MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 35W
* Voltage range: 1.00-1.250
* Number of
* Transistors: 410 million
* It '''Does''' support sse4.1
 
== GeekBench ==
 
[image|1008365]
 
Now while the T9300 Benchmarks less than the X7900, the T9300 runs macOS much smoother than the X7900 ran OS X Yosemite and El Capitan. I don't know a whole lot about specs for processors but I think its because the T9300 has the 6MB L2 Cache, it runs at a significantly lower temp due to lower TDP and voltage and because it has over 1 million more transistors than the X7900.
 
One thing to note tho. The T9300 is recognized as only being a 400MHz base frequency processor. I assumed that with the Geekbench being the numbers that it was, I was pretty sure that it was actually running at a higher frequency than that. But I wanted to make sure and after long hours of searching for a app that would allow me to see frequency I figured out that there must not be a way to do that natively in macOS. So I decided to add the FakeSMC.kext sensor kext that you would use in a hackintosh and installed them into /Library/Extensions and then rebuilt the cache with kext utility. I thought it was a long shot but it actually worked. I can confirm that at idle the T9300 is at 1.19GHz and at almost full throttle it is at 2.39 GHz.
 
[image|1008368]
 
That is just a little lower than the 2.50GHz but if you look at istat menus the cpu is not quite maxed out yet.
 
Next I did research on adding 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 support. I found a post from Clemens on here [post|162178] and he listed every thing we need to upgrade our iMacs. I will list it here again but I am giving him all the credit. So if you check this link out please give him the credit. The post I am pasting this from is the second post down from the question.
 
* An Apple Broadcom BCM94360CSAX combo card, approx $10.- on ebay
 
'''OR'''
 
* An Apple Broadcom BCM943602CS (BT 4.1) combo card, approx $17.- on ebay
 
'''AND'''
 
* A compatible M.2 (NGFF) to mini PCIe adapter (also named as BCM94360CD to mini PCIe adapter), approx $4.- on ebay
* 3x U.FL female to MHF4 male plug antenna adapter cable, approx $3.- per piece, so total $9.- on ebay
 
After that all you need to do is make a custom macOS USB Installer using the macOS Sierra Patcher tool.
 
Everything that I bought to upgrade my iMac was $48 USD to upgrade my iMac so it would support macOS and all of its features. So to answer my own question, YES I would definitely say it was worth it!!!

Status:

open

Edit by: Dan ,

Text:

The process of upgrading the hardware in my 20" 2007 iMac is complete. I am running the latest beta of macOS 10.12.3(16D30a). I have 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 so I have full support for Continuity.
 
I.E. Handoff and Universal Clipboard.
 
First I'll start out the the processor swap. I was running the X7900 Core 2 Extreme for a long time.
 
== Specs X7900: ==
 
* Base frequency: 2.80GHz
* Cache: 4MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 44W
* Voltage range: 1.100-1.375
* Number of
* transistors: 291 million
* Does '''''NOT''''' support sse4.1 instructions
 
== GeekBench: ==
 
[image|1008358]
 
This was a good processor. I first installed it while using OS X Lion. Other than running a little hot it seemed to run OS X great until I got to OS X Yosemite. There I started to get beachballs and very jittery movements in animations. It wasn't so bad that I couldn't deal with it but I just assumed my time with the 2007 iMac was coming to an end. With the lack of support for macOS it was really starting to seem real. I just assumed that with an almost 10 year old iMac there wouldn't be any processors that would support sse4.1 and work in my iMac. I was wrong. Pretty much, there are 3 CPU's to choose from;
 
* T9300
* T9500
* X9000
 
Those are the only 3 that I found that support sse4.1 '''AND''' have an 800 FSB. That is because the 7,1 iMac only supports 800 FSB. Anything higher than that won't boot. I tried. I bought an E8135 for $6.00 on Ebay just to try out because it was so cheap. And the iMac wouldn't completely boot.
 
I decided to go with the T9300. It was $18 USD is pretty much what it came down to. All three of these processors have the same exact specs except for base frequency and also the X9000 TDP is 44W and not 35W like the other 2.
 
== Specs T9300: ==
 
* Base frequency: 2.50GHz
* Cache: 6MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 35W
* Voltage range: 1.00-1.250
* Number of
* Transistors: 410 million
* It '''Does'''supportDoes''' support sse4.1
* It '''Does'''supportDoes''' support sse4.1
 
== GeekBench ==
 
[image|1008365]
 
Now while the T9300 Benchmarks less than the X7900, the T9300 runs macOS much smoother than the X7900 ran OS X Yosemite and El Capitan. I don't know a whole lot about specs for processors but I think its because the T9300 has the 6MB L2 Cache, it runs at a significantly lower temp due to lower TDP and voltage and because it has over 1 million more transistors than the X7900.
 
One thing to note tho. The T9300 is recognized as only being a 400MHz base frequency processor. I assumed that with the Geekbench being the numbers that it was, I was pretty sure that it was actually running at a higher frequency than that. But I wanted to make sure and after long hours of searching for a app that would allow me to see frequency I figured out that there must not be a way to do that natively in macOS. So I decided to add the FakeSMC.kext sensor kext that you would use in a hackintosh and installed them into /Library/Extensions and then rebuilt the cache with kext utility. I thought it was a long shot but it actually worked. I can confirm that at idle the T9300 is at 1.19GHz and at almost full throttle it is at 2.39 GHz.
 
[image|1008368]
 
That is just a little lower than the 2.50GHz but if you look at istat menus the cpu is not quite maxed out yet.
 
Next I did research on adding 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 support. I found a post from Clemens on here [post|162178] and he listed every thing we need to upgrade our iMacs. I will list it here again but I am giving him all the credit. So if you check this link out please give him the credit. The post I am pasting this from is the second post down from the question.
 
* An Apple Broadcom BCM94360CSAX combo card, approx $10.- on ebay
 
'''OR'''
 
* An Apple Broadcom BCM943602CS (BT 4.1) combo card, approx $17.- on ebay
 
'''AND'''
 
* A compatible M.2 (NGFF) to mini PCIe adapter (also named as BCM94360CD to mini PCIe adapter), approx $4.- on ebay
* 3x U.FL female to MHF4 male plug antenna adapter cable, approx $3.- per piece, so total $9.- on ebay
 
After that all you need to do is make a custom macOS USB Installer using the macOS Sierra Patcher tool.
 
Everything that I bought to upgrade my iMac was $48 USD to upgrade my iMac so it would support macOS and all of its features. So to answer my own question, YES I would definitely say it was worth it!!!

Status:

open

Edit by: Dan ,

Text:

The process of upgrading the hardware in my 20" 2007 iMac is complete. I am running the latest beta of macOS 10.12.3(16D30a). I have 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 so I have full support for Continuity.
 
I.E. Handoff and Universal Clipboard.
 
First I'll start out the the processor swap. I was running the X7900 Core 2 Extreme for a long time.
 
== Specs X7900: ==
 
* Base frequency: 2.80GHz
* Cache: 4MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 44W
* Voltage range: 1.100-1.375
* Number of
* transistors: 291 million
* Does '''''NOT''''' support sse4.1 instructions
 
== GeekBench: ==
 
[image|1008358]
 
This was a good processor. I first installed it while using OS X Lion. Other than running a little hot it seemed to run OS X great until I got to OS X Yosemite. There I started to get beachballs and very jittery movements in animations. It wasn't so bad that I couldn't deal with it but I just assumed my time with the 2007 iMac was coming to an end. With the lack of support for macOS it was really starting to seem real. I just assumed that with an almost 10 year old iMac there wouldn't be any processors that would support sse4.1 and work in my iMac. I was wrong. Pretty much, there are 3 CPU's to choose from;
 
* T9300
* T9500
* X9000
 
Those are the only 3 that I found that support sse4.1 '''AND''' have an 800 FSB. That is because the 7,1 iMac only supports 800 FSB. Anything higher than that won't boot. I tried. I bought an E8135 for $6.00 on Ebay just to try out because it was so cheap. And the iMac wouldn't completely boot.
 
I decided to go with the T9300. It was $18 USD is pretty much what it came down to. All three of these processors have the same exact specs except for base frequency and also the X9000 TDP is 44W and not 35W like the other 2.
 
== Specs T9300: ==
 
* Base frequency: 2.50GHz
* Cache: 6MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 35W
* Voltage range: 1.00-1.250
* Number of
* Transistors: 410 million
'''* Does'''support* It '''Does'''support sse4.1
'''* Does'''support* It '''Does'''support sse4.1
 
== GeekBench ==
 
[image|1008365]
 
Now while the T9300 Benchmarks less than the X7900, the T9300 runs macOS much smoother than the X7900 ran OS X Yosemite and El Capitan. I don't know a whole lot about specs for processors but I think its because the T9300 has the 6MB L2 Cache, it runs at a significantly lower temp due to lower TDP and voltage and because it has over 1 million more transistors than the X7900.
 
One thing to note tho. The T9300 is recognized as only being a 400MHz base frequency processor. I assumed that with the Geekbench being the numbers that it was, I was pretty sure that it was actually running at a higher frequency than that. But I wanted to make sure and after long hours of searching for a app that would allow me to see frequency I figured out that there must not be a way to do that natively in macOS. So I decided to add the FakeSMC.kext sensor kext that you would use in a hackintosh and installed them into /Library/Extensions and then rebuilt the cache with kext utility. I thought it was a long shot but it actually worked. I can confirm that at idle the T9300 is at 1.19GHz and at almost full throttle it is at 2.39 GHz.
 
[image|1008368]
 
That is just a little lower than the 2.50GHz but if you look at istat menus the cpu is not quite maxed out yet.
 
Next I did research on adding 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 support. I found a post from Clemens on here [post|162178] and he listed every thing we need to upgrade our iMacs. I will list it here again but I am giving him all the credit. So if you check this link out please give him the credit. The post I am pasting this from is the second post down from the question.
 
* An Apple Broadcom BCM94360CSAX combo card, approx $10.- on ebay
 
'''OR'''
 
* An Apple Broadcom BCM943602CS (BT 4.1) combo card, approx $17.- on ebay
 
'''AND'''
 
* A compatible M.2 (NGFF) to mini PCIe adapter (also named as BCM94360CD to mini PCIe adapter), approx $4.- on ebay
* 3x U.FL female to MHF4 male plug antenna adapter cable, approx $3.- per piece, so total $9.- on ebay
 
After that all you need to do is make a custom macOS USB Installer using the macOS Sierra Patcher tool.
 
Everything that I bought to upgrade my iMac was $48 USD to upgrade my iMac so it would support macOS and all of its features. So to answer my own question, YES I would definitely say it was worth it!!!

Status:

open

Edit by: Dan ,

Text:

The process of upgrading the hardware in my 20" 2007 iMac is complete. I am running the latest beta of macOS 10.12.3(16D30a). I have 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 so I have full support for Continuity.
 
I.E. Handoff and Universal Clipboard.
 
First I'll start out the the processor swap. I was running the X7900 Core 2 Extreme for a long time.
== '''Specs
== Specs
X7900: ''' ==
== '''Specs
== Specs
X7900: ''' ==
* Base frequency: 2.80GHz
* Cache: 4MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 44W
* Voltage range: 1.100-1.375
* Number of
* transistors: 291 million
* Does '''''NOT''''' support sse4.1 instructions
== ''' GeekBench: '''
== GeekBench:
==
== ''' GeekBench: '''
== GeekBench:
==
[image|1008358]
 
This was a good processor. I first installed it while using OS X Lion. Other than running a little hot it seemed to run OS X great until I got to OS X Yosemite. There I started to get beachballs and very jittery movements in animations. It wasn't so bad that I couldn't deal with it but I just assumed my time with the 2007 iMac was coming to an end. With the lack of support for macOS it was really starting to seem real. I just assumed that with an almost 10 year old iMac there wouldn't be any processors that would support sse4.1 and work in my iMac. I was wrong. Pretty much, there are 3 CPU's to choose from;
 
* T9300
* T9500
* X9000
 
Those are the only 3 that I found that support sse4.1 '''AND''' have an 800 FSB. That is because the 7,1 iMac only supports 800 FSB. Anything higher than that won't boot. I tried. I bought an E8135 for $6.00 on Ebay just to try out because it was so cheap. And the iMac wouldn't completely boot.
 
I decided to go with the T9300. It was $18 USD is pretty much what it came down to. All three of these processors have the same exact specs except for base frequency and also the X9000 TDP is 44W and not 35W like the other 2.
== '''Specs T9300:'''
== Specs T9300:
==
== '''Specs T9300:'''
== Specs T9300:
==
* Base frequency: 2.50GHz
* Cache: 6MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 35W
* Voltage range: 1.00-1.250
* Number of
* Transistors: 410 million
* '''''Does''''' support'''* Does'''support sse4.1
== '''GeekBench'''


== GeekBench
==
* '''''Does''''' support'''* Does'''support sse4.1
== '''GeekBench'''


== GeekBench
==
[image|1008365]
 
Now while the T9300 Benchmarks less than the X7900, the T9300 runs macOS much smoother than the X7900 ran OS X Yosemite and El Capitan. I don't know a whole lot about specs for processors but I think its because the T9300 has the 6MB L2 Cache, it runs at a significantly lower temp due to lower TDP and voltage and because it has over 1 million more transistors than the X7900.
 
One thing to note tho. The T9300 is recognized as only being a 400MHz base frequency processor. I assumed that with the Geekbench being the numbers that it was, I was pretty sure that it was actually running at a higher frequency than that. But I wanted to make sure and after long hours of searching for a app that would allow me to see frequency I figured out that there must not be a way to do that natively in macOS. So I decided to add the FakeSMC.kext sensor kext that you would use in a hackintosh and installed them into /Library/Extensions and then rebuilt the cache with kext utility. I thought it was a long shot but it actually worked. I can confirm that at idle the T9300 is at 1.19GHz and at almost full throttle it is at 2.39 GHz.
 
[image|1008368]
 
That is just a little lower than the 2.50GHz but if you look at istat menus the cpu is not quite maxed out yet.
 
Next I did research on adding 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 support. I found a post from Clemens on here [post|162178] and he listed every thing we need to upgrade our iMacs. I will list it here again but I am giving him all the credit. So if you check this link out please give him the credit. The post I am pasting this from is the second post down from the question.
 
* An Apple Broadcom BCM94360CSAX combo card, approx $10.- on ebay
 
'''OR'''
 
* An Apple Broadcom BCM943602CS (BT 4.1) combo card, approx $17.- on ebay
 
'''AND'''
 
* A compatible M.2 (NGFF) to mini PCIe adapter (also named as BCM94360CD to mini PCIe adapter), approx $4.- on ebay
* 3x U.FL female to MHF4 male plug antenna adapter cable, approx $3.- per piece, so total $9.- on ebay
 
After that all you need to do is make a custom macOS USB Installer using the macOS Sierra Patcher tool.
 
Everything that I bought to upgrade my iMac was $48 USD to upgrade my iMac so it would support macOS and all of its features. So to answer my own question, YES I would definitely say it was worth it!!!

Status:

open

Edit by: Dan ,

Text:

The process of upgrading the hardware in my 20" 2007 iMac is complete. I am running the latest beta of macOS 10.12.3(16D30a). I have 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 so I have full support for Continuity.
 
I.E. Handoff and Universal Clipboard.
 
First I'll start out the the processor swap. I was running the X7900 Core 2 Extreme for a long time.
 
== '''Specs X7900: ''' ==
 
* Base frequency: 2.80GHz
* Cache: 4MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 44W
* Voltage range: 1.100-1.375
* Number of
* transistors: 291 million
* Does '''''NOT''''' support sse4.1 instructions
 
== ''' GeekBench: ''' ==
 
[image|1008358]
 
This was a good processor. I first installed it while using OS X Lion. Other than running a little hot it seemed to run OS X great until I got to OS X Yosemite. There I started to get beachballs and very jittery movements in animations. It wasn't so bad that I couldn't deal with it but I just assumed my time with the 2007 iMac was coming to an end. With the lack of support for macOS it was really starting to seem real. I just assumed that with an almost 10 year old iMac there wouldn't be any processors that would support sse4.1 and work in my iMac. I was wrong. Pretty much, there are 3 CPU's to choose from;
 
* T9300
* T9500
* X9000
 
Those are the only 3 that I found that support sse4.1 '''AND''' have an 800 FSB. That is because the 7,1 iMac only supports 800 FSB. Anything higher than that won't boot. I tried. I bought an E8135 for $6.00 on Ebay just to try out because it was so cheap. And the iMac wouldn't completely boot.
 
I decided to go with the T9300. It was $18 USD is pretty much what it came down to. All three of these processors have the same exact specs except for base frequency and also the X9000 TDP is 44W and not 35W like the other 2.
 
== '''Specs T9300:''' ==
 
* Base frequency: 2.50GHz
* Cache: 6MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 35W
* Voltage range: 1.00-1.250
* Number of
* Transistors: 410 million
 
* '''''Does''''' support sse4.1
 
== '''GeekBench''' ==
 
[image|1008365]
 
Now while the T9300 Benchmarks less than the X7900, the T9300 runs macOS much smoother than the X7900 ran OS X Yosemite and El Capitan. I don't know a whole lot about specs for processors but I think its because the T9300 has the 6MB L2 Cache, it runs at a significantly lower temp due to lower TDP and voltage and because it has over 1 million more transistors than the X7900.
 
One thing to note tho. The T9300 is recognized as only being a 400MHz base frequency processor. I assumed that with the Geekbench being the numbers that it was, I was pretty sure that it was actually running at a higher frequency than that. But I wanted to make sure and after long hours of searching for a app that would allow me to see frequency I figured out that there must not be a way to do that natively in macOS. So I decided to add the FakeSMC.kext sensor kext that you would use in a hackintosh and installed them into /Library/Extensions and then rebuilt the cache with kext utility. I thought it was a long shot but it actually worked. I can confirm that at idle the T9300 is at 1.19GHz and at almost full throttle it is at 2.39 GHz.
 
[image|1008368]
 
That is just a little lower than the 2.50GHz but if you look at istat menus the cpu is not quite maxed out yet.
 
Next I did research on adding 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 support. I found a post from Clemens on here [post|162178] and he listed every thing we need to upgrade our iMacs. I will list it here again but I am giving him all the credit. So if you check this link out please give him the credit. The post I am pasting this from is the second post down from the question.
 
* anAn Apple Broadcom BCM94360CSAX combo card, approx $10.- on ebay
* anAn Apple Broadcom BCM94360CSAX combo card, approx $10.- on ebay
 
'''OR'''
 
* anAn Apple Broadcom BCM943602CS (BT 4.1) combo card, approx $17.- on ebay
* anAn Apple Broadcom BCM943602CS (BT 4.1) combo card, approx $17.- on ebay
 
'''AND'''
 
* aA compatible M.2 (NGFF) to mini PCIe adapter (also named as BCM94360CD to mini PCIe adapter), approx $4.- on ebay
* aA compatible M.2 (NGFF) to mini PCIe adapter (also named as BCM94360CD to mini PCIe adapter), approx $4.- on ebay
* 3x U.FL female to MHF4 male plug antenna adapter cable, approx $3.- per piece, so total $9.- on ebay
 
After that all you need to do is make a custom macOS USB Installer using the macOS Sierra Patcher tool.
 
Everything that I bought to upgrade my iMac was $48 USD to upgrade my iMac so it would support macOS and all of its features. So to answer my own question, YES I would definitely say it was worth it!!!

Status:

open

Edit by: Dan ,

Text:

The process of upgrading the hardware in my 20" 2007 iMac is complete. I am running the latest beta of macOS 10.12.3(16D30a). I have 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 so I have full support for Continuity.
 
I.E. Handoff and Universal Clipboard.
 
First I'll start out the the processor swap. I was running the X7900 Core 2 Extreme for a long time.
 
== '''Specs X7900: ''' ==
 
* Base frequency: 2.80GHz
* Cache: 4MB L2
* Bus speed: 800 MHz FSB
* TDP: 44W
* Voltage range: 1.100-1.375
* Number of
* transistors: 291 million
* Does '''''NOT''''' support sse4.1 instructions
 
== ''' GeekBench: ''' ==
 
[image|1008358]
 
This was a good processor. I first installed it while using OS X Lion. Other than running a little hot it seemed to run OS X great until I got to OS X Yosemite. There I started to get beachballs and very jittery movements in animations. It wasn't so bad that I couldn't deal with it but I just assumed my time with the 2007 iMac was coming to an end. With the lack of support for macOS it was really starting to seem real. I just assumed that with an almost 10 year old iMac there wouldn't be any processors that would support sse4.1 and work in my iMac. I was wrong. Pretty much, there are 3 CPU's to choose from;
 
* T9300
* T9500
* X9000
 
Those are the only 3 that I found that support sse4.1 '''AND''' have an 800 FSB. That is because the 7,1 iMac only supports 800 FSB. Anything higher than that won't boot. I tried. I bought an E8135 for $6.00 on Ebay just to try out because it was so cheap. And the iMac wouldn't completely boot.
 
I decided to go with the T9300. It was $18 USD is pretty much what it came down to. All three of these processors have the same exact specs except for base frequency and also the X9000 TDP is 44W and not 35W like the other 2.
 
== '''Specs T9300:''' ==
 
* BaseBase frequency: 2.50GHz

* Cache

* Cache
: 6MB L2

* Bus

* Bus
speed: 800 MHz FSB

* TDP

* TDP
: 35W

* Voltage

* Voltage
range: 1.00-1.250

* Number

* Number
of

* transistors

* Transistors
: 410 million
* BaseBase frequency: 2.50GHz

* Cache

* Cache
: 6MB L2

* Bus

* Bus
speed: 800 MHz FSB

* TDP

* TDP
: 35W

* Voltage

* Voltage
range: 1.00-1.250

* Number

* Number
of

* transistors

* Transistors
: 410 million
 
* '''''Does''''' support sse4.1
 
== '''GeekBench''' ==
 
[image|1008365]
 
Now while the T9300 Benchmarks less than the X7900, the T9300 runs macOS much smoother than the X7900 ran OS X Yosemite and El Capitan. I don't know a whole lot about specs for processors but I think its because the T9300 has the 6MB L2 Cache, it runs at a significantly lower temp due to lower TDP and voltage and because it has over 1 million more transistors than the X7900.
 
One thing to note tho. The T9300 is recognized as only being a 400MHz base frequency processor. I assumed that with the Geekbench being the numbers that it was, I was pretty sure that it was actually running at a higher frequency than that. But I wanted to make sure and after long hours of searching for a app that would allow me to see frequency I figured out that there must not be a way to do that natively in macOS. So I decided to add the FakeSMC.kext sensor kext that you would use in a hackintosh and installed them into /Library/Extensions and then rebuilt the cache with kext utility. I thought it was a long shot but it actually worked. I can confirm that at idle the T9300 is at 1.19GHz and at almost full throttle it is at 2.39 GHz.
 
[image|1008368]
 
That is just a little lower than the 2.50GHz but if you look at istat menus the cpu is not quite maxed out yet.
 
Next I did research on adding 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 support. I found a post from Clemens on here [post|162178] and he listed every thing we need to upgrade our iMacs. I will list it here again but I am giving him all the credit. So if you check this link out please give him the credit. The post I am pasting this from is the second post down from the question.
 
* an Apple Broadcom BCM94360CSAX combo card, approx $10.- on ebay
 
'''OR'''
 
* an Apple Broadcom BCM943602CS (BT 4.1) combo card, approx $17.- on ebay
 
'''AND'''
 
* a compatible M.2 (NGFF) to mini PCIe adapter (also named as BCM94360CD to mini PCIe adapter), approx $4.- on ebay
* 3x U.FL female to MHF4 male plug antenna adapter cable, approx $3.- per piece, so total $9.- on ebay
 
After that all you need to do is make a custom macOS USB Installer using the macOS Sierra Patcher tool.
 
Everything that I bought to upgrade my iMac was $48 USD to upgrade my iMac so it would support macOS and all of its features. So to answer my own question, YES I would definitely say it was worth it!!!

Status:

open

Original post by: nandor690 ,

Text:

The process of upgrading the hardware in my 20" 2007 iMac is complete. I am running the latest beta of macOS 10.12.3(16D30a). I have 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 so I have full support for Continuity.

I.E. Handoff and Universal Clipboard.

First I'll start out the the processor swap. I was running the X7900 Core 2 Extreme for a long time.

== '''Specs X7900:   ''' ==

* Base frequency: 2.80GHz
* Cache:                      4MB L2
* Bus speed:             800 MHz FSB
* TDP:                          44W
* Voltage range:     1.100-1.375
* Number of 
* transistors:          291 million
* Does '''''NOT''''' support sse4.1 instructions

== '''  GeekBench: ''' ==

[image|1008358]

This was a good processor. I first installed it while using OS X Lion. Other than running a little hot it seemed to run OS X great until I got to OS X Yosemite. There I started to get beachballs and very jittery movements in animations. It wasn't so bad that I couldn't deal with it but I just assumed my time with the 2007 iMac was coming to an end. With the lack of support for macOS it was really starting to seem real. I just assumed that with an almost 10 year old iMac there wouldn't be any processors that would support sse4.1 and work in my iMac. I was wrong. Pretty much, there are 3 CPU's to choose from;

* T9300
* T9500
* X9000

Those are the only 3 that I found that support sse4.1 '''AND''' have an 800 FSB. That is because the 7,1 iMac only supports 800 FSB. Anything higher than that won't boot. I tried. I bought an E8135 for $6.00 on Ebay just to try out because it was so cheap. And the iMac wouldn't completely boot.

I decided to go with the T9300. It was $18 USD is pretty much what it came down to.  All three of these processors have the same exact specs except for base frequency and also the X9000 TDP is 44W and not 35W like the other 2.

== '''Specs T9300:''' ==

*   Base frequency: 2.50GHz

*  Cache:                      6MB L2

*  Bus speed:             800 MHz FSB

*  TDP:                          35W

*  Voltage range:     1.00-1.250

*  Number of

*  transistors:          410 million

*  '''''Does''''' support sse4.1

== '''GeekBench''' ==

[image|1008365]

Now while the T9300 Benchmarks less than the X7900, the T9300 runs macOS much smoother than the X7900 ran OS X Yosemite and El Capitan. I don't know a whole lot about specs for processors but I think its because the T9300 has the 6MB L2 Cache, it runs at a significantly lower temp due to lower TDP and voltage and because it has over 1 million more transistors than the X7900.

One thing to note tho. The T9300 is recognized as only being a 400MHz base frequency processor.  I assumed that with the Geekbench being the numbers that it was, I was pretty sure that it was actually running at a higher frequency than that. But I wanted to make sure and after long hours of searching for a app that would allow me to see frequency I figured out that there must not be a way to do that natively in macOS. So I decided to add the FakeSMC.kext sensor kext that you would use in a hackintosh and installed them into /Library/Extensions and then rebuilt the cache with kext utility. I thought it was a long shot but it actually worked. I can confirm that at idle the T9300 is at 1.19GHz and at almost full throttle it is at 2.39 GHz.

[image|1008368]

That is just a little lower than the 2.50GHz but if you look at istat menus the cpu is not quite maxed out yet.

Next I did research on adding 802.11ac and bluetooth 4.0 support. I found a post from Clemens on here [post|162178] and he listed every thing we need to upgrade our iMacs. I will list it here again but I am giving him all the credit. So if you check this link out please give him the credit. The post I am pasting this from is the second post down from the question.

* an Apple Broadcom BCM94360CSAX combo card, approx $10.- on ebay

'''OR'''

* an Apple Broadcom BCM943602CS (BT 4.1) combo card, approx $17.- on ebay

'''AND'''

* a compatible M.2 (NGFF) to mini PCIe adapter (also named as BCM94360CD to mini PCIe adapter), approx $4.- on ebay
* 3x U.FL female to MHF4 male plug antenna adapter cable, approx $3.- per piece, so total $9.- on ebay

After that all you need to do is make a custom macOS USB Installer using the macOS Sierra Patcher tool.

Everything that I bought to upgrade my iMac was $48 USD to upgrade my iMac so it would support macOS and all of its features. So to answer my own question, YES I would definitely say it was worth it!!!

Status:

open