Skip to main content
Help

Current version by: Flying Dutchman ,

Text:

LEDs currently used in lighting fixtures have rated lifetimes of 30,000 to more than 50,000 hours. It is therefore extremely unlikely that such a LED will fail during the lifetime of the fixture, which is why they are not user-replaceable. To put this in perspective, the inverter that powers the LEDs is much more likely to fail than the LEDs themselves.
That said, in the unlikely event a LED should fail, you could probably still replace it yourself, given a bit of patience and a solder iron.
 
To answer your question about light output and the equivalent traditional bulb, this fixture is rated at 990 lumens total for a power consumption of 12W, which is pretty decent at 82 lm/W. Traditional incandescent bulbs have an efficiency of about 12 lm/W, so the traditional equivalent would indeed be somewhere near 3 lightbulbs of 29W each, give or take a Watt.

Status:

open

Original post by: Flying Dutchman ,

Text:

LEDs currently used in lighting fixtures have rated lifetimes of 30,000 to more than 50,000 hours. It is therefore extremely unlikely that such a LED will fail during the lifetime of the fixture, which is why they are not user-replaceable. To put this in perspective, the inverter that powers the LEDs is much more likely to fail than the LEDs themselves.

To answer your question about light output and the equivalent traditional bulb, this fixture is rated at 990 lumens total for a power consumption of 12W, which is pretty decent at 82 lm/W. Traditional incandescent bulbs have an efficiency of about 12 lm/W, so the traditional equivalent would indeed be somewhere near 3 lightbulbs of 29W each, give or take a Watt.

Status:

open