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Current version by Majesty,

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Have you tried trying the Barista in a receptacle other than the GFCI you are currently trying it on? I would try at a friends or neighbors house, just to rule out a service issue at your home or apartment. I once thought I had a faulty brand new microwave, when I tried using it it would cause the breaker to trip. I tried it at a neighbors house and it worked fine. It turns out that if I had my AC on and tried to use the microwave, it would cause the GFCI and breaker to trip. This is usually cause by insufficient amperage in older homes or apartments. If the same problem persists in another circuit, then it's safe to say that the Barista has a short somewhere. Check the power cord on the Barista for small nicks or abrasions, first, and if all is well there, you are going to have to open it up for further inspection.
Have you tried trying the Barista in a receptacle other than the GFCI you are currently trying it on? I would try at a friends or neighbors house, just to rule out a service issue at your home or apartment. I once thought I had a faulty brand new microwave, when I tried using it it would cause the breaker to trip. I tried it at a neighbors house and it worked fine. It turns out that if I had my AC on and tried to use the microwave, it would cause the GFCI and breaker to trip. This is usually cause by insufficient amperage in older homes or apartments. If the same problem persists in another circuit, then it's safe to say that the Barista has a short somewhere. Check the power cord on the Barista for small nicks or abrasions, first, and if all is well there, you are going to have to open it up for further inspection.

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open

Edit by Majesty,

Text:

Have you tried trying the Barista in a receptacle other than the GFCI you are currently trying it on? I would try at a friends or neighbors house, just to rule out a service issue at your home or apartment. I once thought I had a faulty brand new microwave, when I tried using it it would cause the breaker to trip. I tried it at a neighbors house and it worked fine. It turns out that if I had my AC on and tried to use the microwave, it would cause the GFCI and breaker to trip. This is usually cause by insufficient amperage in older homes or apartments. If the same problem persists in another circuit, then it's safe to say that the Barista has a short somewhere. Check the power cord on the Barista for small nicks or abrasions, first, and if all is well there, you are going to have to open it up for further inspection.
Have you tried trying the Barista in a receptacle other than the GFCI you are currently trying it on? I would try at a friends or neighbors house, just to rule out a service issue at your home or apartment. I once thought I had a faulty brand new microwave, when I tried using it it would cause the breaker to trip. I tried it at a neighbors house and it worked fine. It turns out that if I had my AC on and tried to use the microwave, it would cause the GFCI and breaker to trip. This is usually cause by insufficient amperage in older homes or apartments. If the same problem persists in another circuit, then it's safe to say that the Barista has a short somewhere. Check the power cord on the Barista for small nicks or abrasions, first, and if all is well there, you are going to have to open it up for further inspection.

Status:

open

Edit by Majesty,

Text:

Have you tried trying the Barista in a receptacle other than the GFCI you are currently trying it on? I would try at a friends or neighbors house, just to rule out a service issue at your home or apartment. I once thought I had a faulty brand new microwave, when I tried using it it would cause the breaker to trip. I tried it at a neighbors house and it worked fine. It turns out that if I had my AC on and tried to use the microwave, it would cause the GFCI and breaker to trip. This is usually cause by insufficient amperage in older homes or apartments. If the same problem persists in another circuit, then it's safe to say that the Barista has a bad short short somewhere.
Have you tried trying the Barista in a receptacle other than the GFCI you are currently trying it on? I would try at a friends or neighbors house, just to rule out a service issue at your home or apartment. I once thought I had a faulty brand new microwave, when I tried using it it would cause the breaker to trip. I tried it at a neighbors house and it worked fine. It turns out that if I had my AC on and tried to use the microwave, it would cause the GFCI and breaker to trip. This is usually cause by insufficient amperage in older homes or apartments. If the same problem persists in another circuit, then it's safe to say that the Barista has a bad short short somewhere.

Status:

open

Original post by Majesty,

Text:

Have you tried trying the Barista in a receptacle other than the GFCI you are currently trying it on? I would try at a friends or neighbors house, just to rule out a service issue at your home or apartment. I once thought I had a faulty brand new microwave, when I tried using it it would cause the breaker to trip. I tried it at a neighbors house and it worked fine. It turns out that if I had my AC on and tried to use the microwave, it would cause the GFCI and breaker to trip. This is usually cause by insufficient amperage in older homes or apartments. If the same problem persists in another circuit, then it's safe to say that the Barista has a bad short somewhere.

Status:

open