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Current version by: zzz ,

Text:

I'm[image|559561]I'm guessing you have a machine with EFI lock password and you want to change it .
I'm[image|559561]I'm guessing you have a machine with EFI lock password and you want to change it .
 
You can't change the password by replacing the EFI chip without messing up the ME region - the intel management engine. This is true for all core i intel platforms. The ME region is the part of the BIOS that speaks to the PCH and controls things like clock speed, and performance of the integrated GPU. If you mess with this it will run incredibly slow all the time, and be completely useless. You have to reprogram the BIOS with a clean ME region. When the machine first turns on, the BIOS communicates with the PCH and creates a handshake, similar to the first time you log into a new machine using ssh. If the PCH realizes the BIOS has a different handshake for the ME region, they will not communicate, and the machine will run like $@$*.
 
This is applicable to anything core i.
 
Yes, not the answer you want to hear, but you will have to buy a BIOS programmer to do this, and you will have to learn, and it will be terrible because there are no guides out there that make this even remotely simple. Please don't resell this machine with a f'd up ME region. :(

Status:

open

Edit by: zzz ,

Text:

I'm guessing you have a machine with EFI lock password and you want to change it .
 
You can't change the password by replacing the EFI chip without messing up the ME region - the intel management engine. This is true for all core i intel platforms. The ME region is the part of the BIOS that speaks to the PCH and controls things like clock speed, and performance of the integrated GPU. If you mess with this it will run incredibly slow all the time, and be completely useless. You have to reprogram the BIOS with a clean ME region. When the machine first turns on, the BIOS communicates with the PCH and creates a handshake, similar to the first time you log into a new machine using ssh. If the PCH realizes the BIOS has a different handshake for the ME region, they will not communicate, and the machine will run like $@$*.
 
This is applicable to anything core i.
 
Yes, not the answer you want to hear, but you will have to buy a BIOS programmer to do this, and you will have to learn, and it will be terrible because there are no guides out there that make this even remotely simple. Please don't resell this machine with a f'd up ME region. :(

Status:

open

Original post by: zzz ,

Text:

I'm guessing you have a machine with EFI lock password and you want to change it .

You can't change the password by replacing the EFI chip without messing up the ME region - the intel management engine. This is true for all core i intel platforms. The ME region is the part of the BIOS that speaks to the PCH and controls things like clock speed, and performance of the integrated GPU. If you mess with this it will run incredibly slow all the time, and be completely useless. You have to reprogram the BIOS with a clean ME region. When the machine first turns on, the BIOS communicates with the PCH and creates a handshake, similar to the first time you log into a new machine using ssh. If the  PCH realizes the BIOS has a different handshake for the ME region, they will not communicate, and the machine will run like $@$*.

This is applicable to anything core i.

Status:

open