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Current version by: markus weiher ,

Text:

since the space wasn't enough in the comment fielfield i use a new answer to "clarify" something about the repair procedure.
since the space wasn't enough in the comment fielfield i use a new answer to "clarify" something about the repair procedure.
 
but first of all i want to answer barlowdo's question from yesterday (june 9)
 
well, that answer is pretty normal - most companies are only selling those parts.
 
why do you think that there is no way to attach the cable(??) - and yes - ifixit and most users here (that have no business relationship with ifixit) will help other users to repair their devices - BUT - ifixit is an international site with many users around the world - how do you think that ifixit (the company) should "sync" with businesses that can perform those repairs "at an affordable price" - should kyle dictate the price and what is "affordable" in your opinion??
 
some repairs are simply to hard/extreme/risky/whatever - you need special tools, the right skills, you simply need experience for some repairs - and this one is - not even a hard one, but without the proper tools and/or a good portion of creativity, you simply can't do it!
 
the next thing is - nobody should give a "conductive adhesive" about what apple uses in their iPod touches - it does not matter, use something that has the same function and it will be fine.
 
i repaired phones and other tiny stuff for years - but something never changes - some people have a total wrong perspective about this job. everybody want's a professional repair for an affordable price, of course the price had to be very,very affordable. in this special case - what is affordable ? - think about it, you want a pro to do it, you want that the device works after the job is done and it should cost nothing (ok, mybe 5 bucks since the part costs 9$ in china). please don't forget that all iPhones are disposable devices. they aren't build for getting repaired, soldering on the logic board is potentially dangerous (for the board) - even with the needed knowledge/tools/creativity.
 
the best way to desolder/resolder the ribbon cable is with a special soldering tip - but since almost nobody has those things, you need a soldering iron (i use a switchable iron with 30/130w) with a fine smd soldering tip, some soldering grease and solder tin. desolder the ribbon cable carefully, use a little bit of the soldering grease for that, it helps to melt the tin - the contacts on the logic board can easily ripped of (and that could kill the iPod). desolder the cable contact by contact, when you're done - clean the contacts with the soldering iron (all solder points should be almost tin free) - add some solder tin on every contact on the ribbon cable (it's easier that way).
 
soldering the new part on the logic board isn't too hard - first solder the left and the right contacts first to the logic board (that way you don't need to hold the ribbon cable all the time). after that, solder the other contacts, one by one to the board. don't fry the board to death, when you see/feel that the tin is melted, go to the next contact, and finally - use some conductive adhesive (google it)
 
the other point is - the missing conductive adhesive was the problem in the first place - so maybe it's enough to buy this stuff for less than 4$ and try that first

Status:

open

Original post by: markus weiher ,

Text:

since the space wasn't enough in the comment fiel i use a new answer to "clarify" something about the repair procedure.

but first of all i want to answer barlowdo's question from yesterday (june 9)

well, that answer is pretty normal - most companies are only selling those parts.

why do you think that there is no way to attach the cable(??) - and yes - ifixit and most users here (that have no business relationship with ifixit) will help other users to repair their devices - BUT - ifixit is an international site with many users around the world - how do you think that ifixit (the company) should "sync" with businesses that can perform those repairs "at an affordable price" - should kyle dictate the price and what is "affordable" in your opinion??

some repairs are simply to hard/extreme/risky/whatever - you need special tools, the right skills, you simply need experience for some repairs - and this one is - not even a hard one, but without the proper tools and/or a good portion of creativity, you simply can't do it!

the next thing is - nobody should give a "conductive adhesive" about what apple uses in their iPod touches - it does not matter, use something that has the same function and it will be fine.

i repaired phones and other tiny stuff for years - but something never changes - some people have a total wrong perspective about this job. everybody want's a professional repair for an affordable price, of course the price had to be very,very affordable. in this special case - what is affordable ? - think about it, you want a pro to do it, you want that the device works after the job is done and it should cost nothing (ok, mybe 5 bucks since the part costs 9$ in china). please don't forget that all iPhones are disposable devices. they aren't build for getting repaired, soldering on the logic board is potentially dangerous (for the board) - even with the needed knowledge/tools/creativity.

the best way to desolder/resolder the ribbon cable is with a special soldering tip - but since almost nobody has those things, you need a soldering iron (i use a switchable iron with 30/130w) with a fine smd soldering tip, some soldering grease and solder tin. desolder the ribbon cable carefully, use a little bit of the soldering grease for that, it helps to melt the tin - the contacts on the logic board can easily ripped of (and that could kill the iPod). desolder the cable contact by contact, when you're done - clean the contacts with the soldering iron (all solder points should be almost tin free) - add some solder tin on every contact on the ribbon cable (it's easier that way).

soldering the new part on the logic board isn't too hard - first solder the left and the right contacts first to the logic board (that way you don't need to hold the ribbon cable all the time). after that, solder the other contacts, one by one to the board. don't fry the board to death, when you see/feel that the tin is melted, go to the next contact, and finally -  use some conductive adhesive (google it)

the other point is - the missing conductive adhesive was the problem in the first place - so maybe it's enough to buy this stuff for less than 4$ and try that first

Status:

open