Help

Current version by: Joshua ,

Text:

The screen is aan LCD. If I recall correctly, the images are formed by energizing a Liquid Crystal matrix. I believe that when you press on the display, you are displacing the crystals in a manner that allows more of the backlight to show through. Incidentally, I think this also indicates that your replacement screens are not manufactured to the same specs as the one that Apple uses. The glass in an OEM Apple screen assembly is frequently stronger than what is found in many of the less expensive replacement units.
The screen is aan LCD. If I recall correctly, the images are formed by energizing a Liquid Crystal matrix. I believe that when you press on the display, you are displacing the crystals in a manner that allows more of the backlight to show through. Incidentally, I think this also indicates that your replacement screens are not manufactured to the same specs as the one that Apple uses. The glass in an OEM Apple screen assembly is frequently stronger than what is found in many of the less expensive replacement units.

Status:

open

Original post by: Joshua ,

Text:

The screen is a LCD. If I recall correctly, the images are formed by energizing a Liquid Crystal matrix. I believe that when you press on the display, you are displacing the crystals in a manner that allows more of the backlight to show through. Incidentally, I think this also indicates that your replacement screens are not manufactured to the same specs as the one that Apple uses. The glass in an OEM Apple screen assembly is frequently stronger than what is found in many of the less expensive replacement units.

Status:

open