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iPhone 4S Headphone Jack & Volume Control Cable

$24.95

Product code: IF115-013
Apple Part #: 821-1336-A

Product Overview

This part contains the headphone jack, vibrate switch, volume button cables and the 2nd microphone used for noise cancelling.

No buttons are included with the cable.

Compatibility

Identify your iPhone

  • iPhone 4S

Product Details

$24.95 Black

 
 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

6 month warranty

$24.95 White

 
 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

6 month warranty

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Compatibility

iPhone 4S
16 GB
32 GB
64 GB
 

Stories

My Problem

I had messed up the headphone jack trying to get lint out of it, but I was just living with it. Then the back of my phone was cracked open, and I pulled it off to verify that my battery had begun the li-ion battery's swan song of expanding, so the repair couldn't wait any longer.

My Fix

I'll be honest, that was almost as scary as dropping my transmission for the first time. Thankfully you're guides are excellent and your pictures contain many pixels, so I made it through successfully.

My Advice

Don't be too scared, but don't get sloppy, either. Also don't toss the parts you're replacing immediately. I probably wouldn't have been able to fold the headphone cable up properly if it hadn't been for having the old one sitting there.

glen's Story Photo #229542
glen's Story Photo #229543

My Problem

My external microphone stopped working after I successfully repaired a failed telephone ear speaker. I'm not sure if the mic failure was related to my speaker repair or just a coincidence. The mic was not disturbed during the speaker repair.

My Fix

The repair went well. All parts on the ribbon cable supporting the mic (earphone jack, volume buttons, silence switch) work properly.

My Advice

The silence switch is held onto a metal mounting plate with adhesive AND two plastic posts that are melted to form rivet heads. Removing the old ribbon cable and integral silence switch involves breaking the adhesive bond and breaking the plastic rivets. After adhering the silence switch to the metal mount, I used a soldering iron to melt the (new) plastic pins, mechanically securing the switch.

When I powered the iPhone 4S on for the first time following the repair, the cell phone would not transmit or receive. I got the cell phone working using the solutions found here - http://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View/10751... It would be a good idea to reference these instructions any time the battery is disconnected in (at least) a 4S.

My Problem

The tip of a headphone plug broke off in my 4S's Jack. Despite every attempt to remove it, I was unsuccessful. I determined that I would need to replace the whole jack.

My Fix

The whole process took about an hour and a half, I went very slow so your mileage will vary. The hardest part was removing the battery. It was surprisingly flexible and mushy. I used the larger Plastic Opening Tool for this which worked well.

After all was said and done, I had a working iPhone and a headache from staring at such small parts for so long.

My Advice

Spend the money and get the Plastic Opening Tools! They made it much easier to remove little parts and pieces that I would have probably broke without them.

A good pair of tweezers is VERY helpful.

I used a piece of tape(sticky side up) attached to a piece of paper that I stuck the screws to as I removed them. I would then write on the paper next to the screws the step number that corresponded to the screws.

Also, don't be afraid of the flexible battery. Just be careful to not puncture it.

My Problem

My iphone was stuck in headphone mode due to what I thought was a hardware issue.

My Fix

The repair went well. I used the ifixit guide and was very easy to follow. My tools performed well except for me #00 screw driver. Not sure if I just got a bad one or what but it was too flat instead of being sharp enough to actually get to the screws.

My Advice

Just take your time, this repair is pretty difficult due to how far you have to strip the phone down.

My Problem

When cleaning out my liquid damaged phone, I accidentally tore the headphone jack assembly cable.

My Fix

Okay, so I am a recently turned stay at home mom. In the craziness of trying to get things done, I didn't do one thing that I always do - check my back pocket before going to the restroom. The next part may not be for the faint of heart. Yes, as I was rushing to go to the restroom before the baby started crying, I dropped my phone in the toilet. My wonderful phone that I had bought myself as a last present before I stopped making money for myself. As always though, I treat things as if there is hope. First off, I knew I had to get the phone out as quick as possible. Secondly, I needed to turn it off as soon as possible. It wasn't happening. It would turn on as soon as I tried to turn it off.

That's okay, I'll just open it up and pull the battery. I was going to open it up anyways. Wait, what type of screws are those?

Fast foward. I've gotten my pentalobe screwdriver, and after leaving my phone in a bag of rice while waiting for the screwdriver to arrive, I took it out and opened the phone to see the damage. Oh yes, water had gotten almost everything important, and all the stickers were pink. Corrosion on the battery and LCD connection. I forgot to mention, the phone seems to work fine (tested out speakers, mic's, cameras, sensors) but the phone is turning off about every 5 minutes, with the LCD sort of "fraying" as it's on it's way out). So, back to where I have it open. I take the whole thing apart, COMPLETELY, as I wanted to ensure no more corrosion. I armed myself with 91% isopropyl alcohol and a toothbrush and scrubbed every last bit down. Everything. Finished off with some compressed air, and left everything apart until a new battery came in (just wanted to replace that even if the phone would've worked properly.. Never wanna mess with batteries that have potential liquid damage!). So, I replace the battery a few days later and wa la! Everything works perfect. Except... On my way into the phone, the top mic on the 4s is this very little cable attached to the headphone jack assembly. Literally, all I did was hold onto it, look up at my son, And the slight motion tore the mic clean off. So, here's where the assembly comes in. Long story short, the repair is simple based on how comfortable you are taking things apart. And the story ends happily. The part is great quality, and the phone works as strong as the day I got it. In fact, I'm typing on it now, which is the reason for the long paragraph. Success!

My Advice

If you ever drop your $700 iPhone 4s into liquid, follow those same steps the best you can and you will probably have a working phone again. Apple makes their products strong and I've always had great success in being able to repair their phones pretty easily. They don't use cheap stuff to throw together their phones! So I also say this - invest in an iPhone! Oh yes, and thank you ifixit... I did need to see the guides to see if the 4s headphone jack assembly was the same as the 4 (I haven't owned a 4.. Just went right from a 3G.) Well, one site said it was.. And thank goodness I was calm enough to research it some more, as this site had the valuable information I was looking for. I was more than pleased at receiving a very hard to find part and thankfully it was what I needed.

My Problem

You know that thin metal foil that they like to use for wrapping chewing gum?

You know how it often times crumbles and sits in the bottom of your pocket after washing them?

Well sometimes, it can also get into the headphone jack on your iPhone and begin wreaking havoc.

To make matters worse, at the end of the inside of the headphone jack (where the tip of the mini plug goes) there is a small hole that exposes the thin film cable that connects said headphone jack and noise canceling mic to the mainboard of your phone!

So, after the gum wrapper pieces got inside my phone, I got to trying to dig them out, and damaged said cabling.

My Fix

Successfully!

Prepare a clean working area, and print (or draw) a chart where you can place the screws removed form your iPhone as you remove them.

There are many screws that are only slightly different (in fractions of millimeter diameter or length) and you will want to have a visual reference of what parts and screws go where when you go to reassemble your device!

Go slowly, making sure to follow the instructions carefully.

When you get to the point that you are removing the thin film cables from the inside of your phone, proceed very slowly making sure not to pull up to fast or tear the cabling.

After about an hour or two of work, you should be all done!

Now my phone works perfectly, and to be extra careful, I put a small piece of hard plastic shielding on the back of the headphone connector to prevent outside debris or protrusions from damaging the fragile internal cabling.

My Advice

If something happens to your headphone connector, DO NOT go digging in there to get something out!