Kinect Teardown Video

November 5, 2010 Site News, Teardowns — Kyle Wiens

We’re thinking about doing video overviews of major teardowns. We’ve created Animoto video slideshows in the past, but I’ll be the first to admit they didn’t add much value to our written teardown. For this video, we tried a completely different take: MJ (one of our technicians) shows you through the entire disassembly process.

This video is not a repair guide. Rather, it’s a quick overview of how to get inside the Kinect. Videos are really good at communicating context and repair difficulty, providing someone who’s never done it before an overview of the process. They’re not nearly as good at teaching repair—it’s incredibly frustrating to follow a repair video, constantly starting and stopping it to keep track of where you’re at. At the same time, the detailed repair manuals that are so useful when you’re doing a repair can be very intimidating when you’re first considering whether or not to fix something. I like to think of videos like this as a gateway drug to repair. We’re going to give you enough of a taste to get you hooked on the exciting possibility that you can fix your own hardware, then give you the best resource available to help you do the actual repair: a step-by-step photo guide.

In this sense, a video like this isn’t any different than our teardowns. We take apart every new gizmo to raise awareness that they can be fixed! The repairability score we give every device is serious business: it’s critically important that we consider how we’ll take care of the things we have before we buy them.

There’s one other problem with videos: they’re not a wiki! Our community has made dozens of improvements to the Kinect teardown since we published it yesterday, and it’s a much better document now. Repair manuals need to be living documents, getting better over time as more people use and improve it. That’s theoretically possible with videos too, but no one has written a video wiki yet! We’re going to continue to invest most of our resources into documentation that acts as a starting point for continual improvement.

In summary: We’ll be posting videos to make repair more accessible to new audiences, but they are not a replacement for step-by-step photo repair guides.

Now that I’ve gotten the background out of the way, MJ and I would love to know what you think of the video! What have you always wanted to know in our teardowns that video could convey effectively? Do you see anything we could do better? We’ll work your feedback into our next video.

12 Comments

  1. Ahem…….

    NO.5, Is, ALIVE!

    NO DISSEMBLE! NO DISSEMBLE!

    /Ahem

    great teardown! hopefully this will help someone with the getting into the whole adafruit bounty!

    Comment by david — November 5, 2010 @ 11:31 pm

  2. It is not the first games console accessory which you control without a controller… remember eye toy?

    Comment by Nathan L — November 6, 2010 @ 10:12 am

  3. Hi,

    Cool video, very professional job!! You looked relaxed. friendly and confident.

    See you when Anne and I share a Thanksgiving dinner with you, M and E.

    Take care,

    Ron

    Comment by Ron Rice — November 6, 2010 @ 7:38 pm

  4. Hi,
    Very good video! They say that an image worth a thousand words, so, a video worth at least 30 images per second :)
    I’m sure some videos will let much clearer how to get to that specific picture in a teardown (I’m remembering how long I took to open my mac mini, even when I saw the images, just because I was unsure about that putty knife…)
    But, IMHO whenever you release this let’s say “tutorial” video for a device (that is edited and probably recorded after a few tries), you should too release an “1st hands on” video, showing the device being teared down for the 1st time, with all guessing, wrong trying, creation of new tools, oops, etc…
    I’m sure they will be like gold to many of us that would like to do the same at home.

    Comment by Mauricio Scaff — November 7, 2010 @ 5:46 am

  5. Wow, you make it look very do-able… even for us girls. Very clear instructions and much better than just pictures and text. Thanks. AG

    Comment by Anne G — November 7, 2010 @ 5:24 pm

  6. Very good,professional way, and thank for manage simply and clear and the girl look good…thank

    Comment by osvaldo ortiz — November 10, 2010 @ 7:55 am

  7. Just a quick bit of constructive criticism, the picture at the end where you showed what was taken out went by way too fast, I would have preferred a zoom in on each part in turn and perhaps just naming the part or a quick synopsis of what it does.
    Other than that, and a bit of blurring on my admittedly slow machine, it was great.

    Comment by Graeme Smith — November 10, 2010 @ 10:43 pm

  8. Just a suggestion for later recordings:

    put the camera in a higher position
    use a different background color (not black)
    make your speaker wear a more neutral shirt if you want to get it into the picture
    like others said, mix it with another zoomed camera, if you own it

    Thank you for the video! great job!

    Comment by Florentin — November 11, 2010 @ 1:49 am

  9. Great video on how to tear apart a Kinect. Could have spent more time showing those items and then mentioning the teardown guide that is available on the site.

    I do have to agree with the second post that Sony created the first Controller less gaming Accessory in 2004, as a matter of fact Sony rejected this very design because the camera was to expensive and failed to meet Sony’s specifications on motion control. That is when they went to Logitech to create the PS2 EyeToy camera and a host of games based on Motion Control minus the controller.

    Comment by Mark — November 15, 2010 @ 2:15 am

  10. The best girl:)))))

    Comment by ParT — November 15, 2010 @ 6:38 am

  11. I RESTORECARS SINCE YEARS AND HAVE FOUND I SHOULD FOTOGRAPH ALL ELECTRICAL
    BEFORE I TAKE THEM APART THEN I KNOW EXACTLY HOW IT WAS WHEN IT FUNCTIONED.
    NOTE THE MANUAL IS NOT ALWAYS RIGHT WEATHER DUE TO TRANSLATION OR PRINTING
    ERRORS OR ITS JUST PLAIN WRONG THIS WAY YOU CAN AT LEASDT PUT IT BACK THE
    WAY IT WAS WHEN IT WORKED AND EVERY CELLPHONE HAS WITH ADEQUATE LIGHTING
    THE SUFFICIENT CAMERA THESE DAYS . THE CAMERA POSITION SHOULD AS RECCOMENDED
    BE SLIGHTLY IT GIVES A MORE COMPLETE VEIW OF SUCH THINGS AS RECCESSED SCREWS
    AND COVERED FIXINGS AND THERE YOU TELL PEOPLE HOW TO FIX IT THEY HAVE
    BOUGHT IT ALREADY AND KNOW THE WORTH OF IT, AND HAVE TO FIX IT SO THE FREE
    ADVERTISING SHOWING THE STICKERS IS ALREADY AIMED AT A WARNED VICTIM AND
    THEREFORE INNEFECTIVE. APART FROM THAT IT WOULD simply make youre articles
    visually more informative . Thanks very much shame industries are not a bit
    more Bucky Fuller minded . BRIAN SOL 3

    Comment by brian — November 16, 2010 @ 12:32 pm

  12. Hey anybody knows specs for the proprietary usb used in kinect? I was wondering about using a different type of power adapter, then the oryginal one? anybody has pinouts from xbox360 slim?

    Comment by azjata — November 30, 2010 @ 9:07 am


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