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Plastic Opening Tools

$2.95

Product code: IF145-000

Product Overview

The essential tool for opening everything.

Making these tools soft enough to not scratch or mar devices does mean they will wear with each use. Expect each pair to last through 2-5 devices, depending on difficulty and experience.

  • Use these soft plastic tools to safely pry open devices without scratching the case, glass, or internal components.
  • Sold in a pair of two different styles—a wide tool with a thin tip that's great for getting underneath glass and in thin cracks, and a smaller, stiffer tip that's good for prying tougher cases and enclosures.

Product Details

$2.95 Pair

 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

Sold as-is; no refunds or returns

$14.95 15 Pairs

 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

Sold as-is; no refunds or returns

Notes:

Includes 30 total Plastic Opening Tools. 15 of each style.

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Product Details Edit

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Plastic opening tools are made of a soft plastic, allowing them to dislodge casing clips without fear of scratching or chewing the case.

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Their size and material also make our plastic opening tools ideal for working inside the device—use them to pop up ZIF connector tabs, disconnect cable connectors, pry up batteries, and scrape off excess adhesive.

 

Stories

My Problem

One of the audio channels was not being transmitted by the headphone jack.

My Fix

The repair took me less than 30 minutes. This was my first time repairing this kind of Ipod. The other kind was a nano, and I will say for sure that this one was MUCH easier than the nano. You can do it.

My Advice

As others have said, the hardest part is getting the metal case off. Your best friend in this is the putty knife. I got it started with the plastic opening tools, but I relied on the putty knife to work it open. The hardware that holds the ribbons in place can be a minor problem, I could barely see the mechanism and it was stuck securely and I was afraid I might break it, even with the spudger. My advice: be careful, use lots of light, and have a magnifying glass handy. Also taking a "before" picture of the hardware inside will help you, if you start wondering if you did something wrong (you can probably find these online). The jacks went out and in with no difficulty, but it was a pain to get the ribbon back in, the two halves of the device were so close together that it made it difficult to grab the one ribbon and slide it back into place to be locked. I could have used a pair of rubber tipped pliers or something to help there, I got it in, but it was the second most difficult part for me. Also, when the little line on the ribbon is flush with the ribbon holder, it is now "in place" and you can lock it. One final bit of advice: when prying open the case, the metal backing may become slightly deformed, I gently sqeezed the metal backing of the ipod so the when I closed it, it would have a nice tight fit. Looks perfect, works perfect.

eflath's Story Photo #347009

My Problem

The camera was unable to focus on anything further than 1 foot away. It would keep struggling and never settle. In a really quiet room you could even hear the mechanism grinding away.

My Fix

The repair took about two hours from start to finish. This is the amount of time I budgeted for, and I took my time to get it done. I am very glad I didn't rush.

My Advice

An electrical engineer friend gave me this tip:

To keep track of all the tiny parts you remove, lay out strips of double-sided tape on a paper plate. This keeps tiny screws from rolling away, and lets you clearly label the step associated with each piece. (see photo)

Getting the flash in the right spot was a bit confusing. Look very carefully at the photos in the guide to see how it should sit. Also, check out how the ribbon is folded up through the bracket in step 28.

My flash wouldn't settle into its proper place until I replaced the bracket in step 16. It helped me to turn the phone over and look at the flash through the back case. From this angle it's very obvious when it's properly positioned.

My Problem

I know a lot of people lie about why their phones break. They tell the people at the Apple store that they swear they have no idea what could have possibly made their phone stop working as images of them flying out of a water slide and splash into a pool go through their minds. However, I charged my phone on a Monday night and then was unable to charge it on Tuesday afternoon. The phone, unable to feed itself the electricity it needed, slowly and pitiably wasted away.

My warranty was long past and I wasn't eligible for an upgrade for two months, so I found myself with this dilemma: buy a phone at retail for between $500-$750 or buy a flip phone or, to take a page from the TV show "The Wire," and buy a "burner."

Unless there was another way...

My Fix

The repair was stressful and took a little more than an hour. I had the help of a friend who had performed a battery transplant recently, though his support was more moral than technical. I felt the Fear when I detached the battery and a small metal piece went airborne--note: You never want anything airborne during phone repair--but I recovered the piece and everything was cool.

My Advice

The best advice I could give is to be patient and to make sure you are following the directions properly. The hardest part is that sometimes you have to be a bit rough with some very fragile pieces. Take heart! The directions are good, look at all the pictures, use an ice cube tray to house the screws and miscellaneous parts, and have confidence that you can save yourself hundreds of dollars and/or the shame of using a burner in a non-drug dealing professional setting.

My Problem

Faulty home button or ribbon cable

My Fix

I have been using my iPhone with a faulty home button or ribbon cable for so long I can't remember. It came to the point a month ago where the button didn't work at all. So I had to assign the optional assistive touch button to access or close apps and that drove me insane. Enough is enough I finally threw in the towel and got online to see if there was a fix and sure enough iFixit popped up. I thought why the !@#$ not. The video and step by step guide seemed simple enough and they even had the right tools. So I placed my order which arrived within a week. Not too bad. Following the video and step by step guide as I thought was easy enough and though the screws were so tiny having the right tools for the job made things quite easy. The only thing I think I did wrong was apply to much force when lifting the front panel off the backing case with the suction cup which came right off without needing to pry the two apart with the tools. Luckily I didn't damage anything. I replaced both the ribbon cable and the button as I wasn't sure which was faulty. Putting things back was fairly simple as well and my phone powered up without any issues. Freakin awesome. Thank you iFixit I am so happy.

My Advice

My advice is don't wait too long to fix your device. I had to use the assistive touch button for so long that now even though with the new home button in place, out of habit I still look for that damned assistive touch button.

My Problem

The battery time was bad!

My Fix

Went like a charm.

My Advice

Nothing, only follow Ifixits instruction and then you got a new battery!

My Problem

Upon visiting the Apple store to complain about the useless power button that mysteriously stopped working on my iPhone, I was told that my only option was to purchase an expensive "out of warranty" replacement. Fortunately, after researching the problem, I chose to buy a repair kit from iFixit instead!

My Fix

The repair process went well, although it was nerve-wracking trying to make sure that I didn't lose any of those tiny screws. It took about two hours, but that included redoing a few steps that I didn't get quite right the first time around. All I can say is thank you so much for the detailed guide! I have a working power button now!!

My Advice

Definitely need a lot of light to see what you're doing. I'd recommend a head lamp. :)

My Problem

bad home button , bad docking port , bad battery and dialed random contacts by itself when charging.

Didn't want to buy a new phone or go on another 2yr contract. and having it repaired costs to much

My Fix

The repair went very easy , took a little over two hrs.

My Advice

take your time , and follow the direction's on this site . label the parts when taken apart . and you shouldn't have a problem !

My Problem

Water damage to 2011 MBP 13"

My Fix

I didn't order the T6 torx screwdriver. I was able to go only so far in my tear down and dissassembly, and ended up stripping out a few of the tiny, soft, aluminum screws that were T6 instead of the T5 that I ordered.

My Advice

Don't be in a hurry, buy more tools than you think you'll need, because you'll need them :-)

My Problem

Very early model ipod4 would not hold a charge anymore. The battery lasted 30 minutes at most.

My Fix

My very early model ipod4 was ALMOST identical to the repair guide but with some extra bits. Mainly some of the parts were held in with a black rubberized tape that had to be cut to remove parts. Other than that the instructions were right on.

My Advice

I would say that you have to have experience with this kind of repair and be comfortable working with electronics and the ever-lingering fear that you will break something. You need to be able to tell how much you can push, pull, or flex something and that is just a sense that techy people have.

I was most afraid of the soldering but that was actually very easy. Once I heated the solder pads on the battey cable they came right off very easily, solder and cable together! I was left with a very clean board to solder the new cable to.

My Problem

I fixed my iPod jack because it would not make connection anymore

My Fix

I broke the glass at the left side while open the I pod now the screen is a bit blurry but further everything works perfect!!!

My Advice

be careful while open it surely witht the glass side