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Oak Gerstner Toolbox

$128.95

Product code: IF145-129-1

Product Overview

This little box is hot! A scaled down version of the highly sought after classic Gerstner oak chest, right down to the diamond shaped mirror. Holds our Pro Tech Toolkit (not included) with room to spare for additional small tools or personal items. Tiny footprint on your desk or workstation, and easy to carry into the field with you.

American Red Oak main construction, all solid hardwood except for felt lined birch ply drawer bottoms. A real leather handle and beautiful chrome hardware finish the package.

The moisture absorbing character of wood keeps tools stored in Gerstner Chests in a rust-free environment. With a little care Gerstner Chests will last a lifetime and beyond.

A Gerstner is the premium thinking man's toolbox with the highest standard of quality. Prized by engineers, machinists, and skilled professionals for more than a century, Gerstners have accompanied Presidents to the White House and kept Orville Wright's tools in good order.

Once upon a time a tradesman would bring his tools to a job interview. Presenting them in a Gerstner Chest reflected well on the applicant like a glowing review from a previous employer. A Gerstner Chest was, and is, evidence of the proud owner's skilled work.

Made by Gerstner International overseas using American Red Oak.

Product Details

  • Width: 10"
  • Depth: 5"
  • Height: 7.75"

  $128.95

 
 

US Only:

This product only ships to US addresses

Condition:

New

Warranty:

One year warranty

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38 Available

Quantity:

 

Stories

woodytus's Story Photo #340171
woodytus's Story Photo #340173

My Problem

After very successfully replacing my 2005 HP iPod Photo battery with an iFixit kit, I just picked up a few items that will help on some of the miniature work that I'm into right now.

My eyes aren't getting any younger so the Head Magnifier, Helping Hands and Inspection scope will keep the details in sight.

The two Gerstner Toolboxes are going to free up some bench space and keep the small stuff organized.

The Flush Wire Cutter is the best there is and will make quick work out of small places.

The images show my 38" diameter digital clock that uses Atomic Clock reference reception of WWVB.

My Fix

My lighted hands digital clock will need everything from my tool order and more.

The clock uses two Microchip 8-bit controllers - One to advance the current Atomic Time, set time zone and adjust lamp brightness while positioning the two proportional servos to the correct hand positions. This chip also outputs a pulse-train of current time into a second controller chip that acts as a smart port expander that drives the twelve purple hour LEDs which pattern against the current time from a table of time & actions in its memory.

Some of my tools date back to the late 70's so a tool upgrade was sorely needed.

My Advice

As modern devices get smaller and smaller, the right tools are just what the doctor ordered.

My Problem

Funny that you mention a nuclear submarine. My husband is a nuclear engineer for the submarine force. I bought gifts for him. Everything arrived in a timely fashion. Review will come after the holiday when he gets to play with his toys.

My Fix

Waiting for Christmas

My Advice

Still waiting.

My Problem

The fix will be in Scott's organization so that he will be more conveniently mobile when he goes to fix his friends computers, iPads, iPhones, etc...

My Fix

N/A

My Advice

None, whatsoever. Nice well built product.

My Problem

My friend gave me his 4 when he upgraded to 4S. It was great, most of the time, but like a bad knee, sometimes when the weather was just right the home button would become all but unusable. Since it was a free phone and the timing wasn't right to buy a new one I decided to take a stab at replacing the button. Plus I wanted an excuse to buy a lot of sexy new tools from iFixit that I'd been eyeing. :)

My Fix

Fairly smoothly. It took probably two hours. One of the hardest parts was prying the screen away from the metal bezel. It took a TON of prying and wedging little things in the gaps. Probably 10-15 minutes. I almost wore through one of the iPod opening tools. Once I felt some of the adhesive give way on one of the corners I felt confident in prying up the rest without damaging anything. I had trouble plugging in the new home button. That little connector is really tricky, and I was part way through reassembling when I realized I'd inserted the ribbon cable beneath the connector instead of inside it. Also, when putting the screen back on I did exactly what the guide warned against: folding one of the ribbon cables, so when I started trying to plug them back into the logic board one wasn't long enough. Glad I didn't damage anything.

One of the more troubling parts is some little rubber bit fell out of the phone during disassembly. For the life of me, I have no idea where it came from. About 5mm long with a C-shaped cross-section. Some sort of riser or insulator. I really have no idea where it came from, and I haven't noticed any side effects without it, but that is NOT a good feeling!

My Advice

If you can get some surgical gloves they might make it easier to keep components oil free. Read through the guide first before starting so you get an idea of what you'll be up against. I was an idiot and just dove right in. And be prepared to deal with a lot of adhesive.

 

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