iPod Nano 4th Generation Teardown

Teardown

Teardown

Teardowns provide a look inside a device and should not be used as disassembly instructions.

We disassembled this iPod on September 10, 2008.

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Edit Step 1 iPod Nano 4th Generation Teardown  ¶ 

  • The iPod Nano 4G!

  • Many of the new Nano's features are software-based, but there are still a lot of exciting changes inside.

  • We're excited to see exactly how they integrated the curved glass into the case.

  • Of course we had to get the orange one.

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Edit Step 2  ¶ 

  • Standard contents included. You have to fork over $80 to get the fancy new headphones with the volume control.

  • We're working on the disassembly now.

  • By the way, we'd like to congratulate Apple on their environmental progress. The one aspect they forget to mention is ease of repair to ensure reuse. Fortunately, we've got you covered there.

  • We'll be making a Fixit Guide for the new Nano soon. Stay tuned!

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Edit Step 3  ¶ 

  • Nano, nano, fat nano, nano.

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Edit Step 4  ¶ 

  • The Nano family, minus the 3rd Gen. The new Nano's screen is almost twice the height of the original Nano's.

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Edit Step 5  ¶ 

  • Apple says it's the "thinnest ever." Sure, if you've got a micrometer. But the curved case sure feels nice!

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Edit Step 6  ¶ 

  • The top of the Nano, after removing the plastic top bezel.

  • This design is very similar to the 2nd Gen Nano, including the incredibly tiny and difficult-to-remove Phillips screws.

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Edit Step 7  ¶ 

  • No surprises here, just like the other end, except one extra screw.

  • The 3.2 mm wide dock connector looks pretty big compared to the iPod. Apple's not going to be able to make their iPods much thinner without a new dock connector.

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Edit Step 8  ¶ 

  • Unfortunately, just like every other Nano, this iPod wasn't designed with serviceability in mind. Sliding the insides out of the casing proved quite difficult.

  • We'll be working on finding a better way to get into this iPod, but for now we'd recommend keeping your new Nano in one piece.

  • slide the insides out until the very lowest connector is visible, about 1/4 of an inch. Be sure to undo this connector before sliding the inides out as seen in the picture.

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Edit Step 9  ¶ 

  • Removing the LCD.

  • One of the most exciting features of the new Nano is what covers the LCD: real glass.

  • Earlier iPod Nanos have been incredibly durable. Hopefully, the same will be true of this iPod, even with a glass screen covering. We certainly appreciate the addition of real glass; it's nice to see some of the enhancements from Apple's larger and more expensive devices make it to the Nano.

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Edit Step 10  ¶ 

  • Fortunately, the glass is separate from the casing. In fact, nothing but the iPod's internals hold the glass in place on the casing.

  • The front of the glass is curved to match the front of the iPod. The glass is about .7 mm thick on the edges, and 1.7 mm thick in the middle.

  • The new LCD is actually almost exactly the same size as the 3rd Gen Nano LCD. The only difference is that instead of a resolution of 320x240, you now get 240x320.

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Edit Step 11  ¶ 

  • The battery isn't very large, but then again, neither is the iPod. Apple claims this slim battery will keep the Nano playing music for 24 hours.

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Edit Step 12  ¶ 

  • The top of the logic board. We're working on identifying the chips.

  • The main processor appears to be an Apple-branded ARM processor manufactured by Samsung with DRAM on-package. Based on the date code, this processor was manufactured in early July of 2008.

  • Markings on the main processor: 339S0049 ARM, K4X56323PI-KGC4, YWE025QH 825, APL0278A00, N1B2HOP 0831

  • Apple-logo chip above the processor: 338S0687-AC, 08288HBB

  • Small black chip below the main processor: 33DL, 2827

  • Shiny Apple chip in the bottom right: 338S055C, 189N0824, SGP

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Edit Step 13  ¶ 

  • The other side, dominated by the 8 GB Toshiba flash chip.

  • On the chip: TH58NVG6D1DLA87, U20516, JAPAN, 0826MAE

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Edit Step 14  ¶ 

  • Unfortunately, the battery is soldered to the logic board. Replacing the Nano's battery isn't going to be easy.

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Edit Step 15  ¶ 

  • All the parts. The main board is incredibly small, especially considering all the features packed into this iPod.

Required Tools

Spudger

$2.95 · 50+ In stock

Phillips #00 Screwdriver

$5.95 · 50+ In stock

Metal Spudger

$2.95 · 50+ In stock

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Universal Drive Adapter

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iFixit Lock Pick Set

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Inspection Scope

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Frictionless Ratchet

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Portable Anti-Static Mat

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Comments Comments are onturn off

this is just kool!... i like iPod... i heard muzic on it ... but never have looked inside it!.. actually which parts are there... thanks for this kool review... :) http://www.buyergen.com

dean miller, · Reply

Sorry to be so direct but Steps 1 through 5 are useless. They tell you nothing about taking this item apart. If this information is necessary then perhaps a "History" icon can be created so when you click it it will give this information.

robbinstony, · Reply

Hi! please, how did u remove the top bezel? does it damage when removing it?

Soporte MacZentrum, · Reply

Quote from soporte:

Hi! please, how did u remove the top bezel? does it damage when removing it?

you grab a simple razor or object thats slender and reomve the top beze with it

person, · Reply

I found another website that explains the process of taking the Nano 4th gen apart much better than here. Perhaps ifixit can refer to it and make it more clearer to other people how to take them apart much easier than described above.

http://www.rapidrepair.com/guides/nano4g...

Sorry ifixit, but your description wasn't as clear here and i ended up breaking the click wheel cable. don't want others like me to do the same thing here cos your website does have great guides, just this one wasn't as great.

Madhatta87, · Reply

Quote from Madhatta87:

I found another website that explains the process of taking the Nano 4th gen apart much better than here. Perhaps ifixit can refer to it and make it more clearer to other people how to take them apart much easier than described above.

http://www.rapidrepair.com/guides/nano4g...

Sorry ifixit, but your description wasn't as clear here and i ended up breaking the click wheel cable. don't want others like me to do the same thing here cos your website does have great guides, just this one wasn't as great.

The teardown is not meant as a take apart guide. In the introduction there is a warning "Teardowns provide a look inside a device and should not be used as disassembly instructions" and on step 8 "We'll be working on finding a better way to get into this iPod, but for now we'd recommend keeping your new Nano in one piece."

Chris Cline, · Reply

I don't mean to blame ifixit but I also broke the wheel and lock cables following this teardown (teardowns for other devices are much more complete).. now my question is: is there a way to repair, change or solder these really thin cables?

cgf, · Reply

Quote from Chris:

The teardown is not meant as a take apart guide. In the introduction there is a warning "Teardowns provide a look inside a device and should not be used as disassembly instructions" and on step 8 "We'll be working on finding a better way to get into this iPod, but for now we'd recommend keeping your new Nano in one piece."

Chris,

Isn't your reply contradictory to goal of iFix?

To make less e-waste by fixing what we have and not trashing it.

I see that at some point iFix will have to decide to either give detailed 'teardowns' or forget doing them.

I too tried to follow these steps to try and dry out a Nano that I found in the rain. I tore the connectors. Now I am wondering whether there are replacement parts for this or if I just made a bunch of 'e-waste'.

robbinstony, · Reply

Quote from robbinstony:

Chris,

Isn't your reply contradictory to goal of iFix?

To make less e-waste by fixing what we have and not trashing it.

I see that at some point iFix will have to decide to either give detailed 'teardowns' or forget doing them.

I too tried to follow these steps to try and dry out a Nano that I found in the rain. I tore the connectors. Now I am wondering whether there are replacement parts for this or if I just made a bunch of 'e-waste'.

Creating a guide for anyone to use to take fix a device is difficult and time consuming. It will take us weeks to figure out the best way to take apart a device so that we don't destroy it in the process. However, people are often interested in what is inside a device. We use the "Teardown" section for this. We do not have a safe way of taking apart the device yet but we want to show people what is inside. We warn people not to follow these steps because we were interested in what was inside and did not know how to do it safely. We will create guides for the iPod Nano 4th Generation in the future but are busy with other things. We try very hard to tell people the difference between a "Guide" and a "Teardown." We have many detailed guides for fixing things but the teardowns are meant to "provide a look inside a device and should not be used as disassembly instructions."

Chris Cline, · Reply

What tool od i need to get in order to remove the coverings?

dan, · Reply

You cannot slide this part out all the way until you have disconnected it from the 'click-wheel' and the display screen. Some how you'll have to remove the exterior screen and then partially slide out the interior screen display so your can see the connector ribbion...it is under some tape. Once the screen is disconnected it should slide out with out any problem. BUT you'll need to 'gently' pry-up on the battery to un-stick it from the back of the casing...THEN you can slide the bottom piece out.

robbinstony, · Reply

Battery is glued to the case.This glue seal must be broken in order to slide the logic board out of the case.No matter how you pry, there's always a bit of sticky battery in contact witth the case.Take the bubble pack which the new battery came in and cut a strip about 1.5inches wide and 4inches long.This is stiff enough and thin enough to slide between the battery and case. The rest is easy.

Pete Green, · Reply

Except that the glass breaks really easily! I just got mine, I dropped it and it shattered, on day one. Fortunately it still works but I will really have to watch the LCD screen.

Drallemicu, · Reply

The ipod nano 4th gen is actually realy easy to get into. I will be putting to ifixit with my teardown of the ipod nano 4th gen

bear250sxf, · Reply

hi. i spilt coke on my ipod 4th gen.. Is there anyway these steps would work? plz, plz, plz HELP ME!!!!!!!!

bob123, · Reply

Quote from bear250sxf:

The ipod nano 4th gen is actually realy easy to get into. I will be putting to ifixit with my teardown of the ipod nano 4th gen

HOW DO U DO IT? I DONT GET HOW U OPEN THE BOTTOM OF THE IPOD. PLZ HELP ME! =(

bob123, · Reply

i dropped my i-pod in the washing machine...everything still works appart from the screen any one know how i can fix it?

ineedhelp96, · Reply

simple buy a screen and iPod opening tools right off this site then use the instructions

Quote from ineedhelp96:

i dropped my i-pod in the washing machine...everything still works appart from the screen any one know how i can fix it?

tman, · Reply

Can you replace the glass without opening the ipod?

Purplehorse, · Reply

What about the accelerometer?

phlyboi, · Reply

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