iPad 4 Wi-Fi Teardown

Teardown

Teardown

Teardowns provide a look inside a device and should not be used as disassembly instructions.

We got our hands on the fourth generation of iPad; we shall call it iPad 4. The iPad 4 is kind of like a fourth book added on to a trilogy: its release was a bit sudden and unexpected, but it's a part of the group, nonetheless. This fourth iteration of iPad shares a lot of similarities with the previous version, so instead of our traditional, exploratory teardown, we're going to play "spot the differences" by illustrating all the changes from the last generation.

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Edit Step 1 iPad 4 Wi-Fi Teardown  ¶ 

  • Welcome, ladies and gentlemen.

  • Apple has stunned the tech world once again. A mere 7 months after the announcement of the iPad 3, the iPad 4 was introduced on October 23, 2012.

  • Tech Specs:

    • Dual-core A6X processor with quad-core GPU

    • 9.7 inch LCD, backlit in-plane switching LED with 2048×1536 pixel Retina display

    • 16, 32, or 64 GB flash memory (at launch)

    • 5 MP rear-facing camera

    • Lightning connector

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Edit Step 2  ¶ 

  • One of the major differences between the 3rd and 4th generation iPads is the connector. The 3rd gen (top) has the 30-pin dock connector, while the 4th gen (bottom) has the Lightning connector.

  • The iPad 4 has a new model number, A1458.

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Edit Step 3  ¶ 

  • Continuing the trend, this iPad is glued shut. This isn't our first adhesive-riddled iPad, and we've been working to figure out how to make the painful opening process a lot easier.

  • Our heated-up iOpener lets us apply heat just where it's needed, softening the troublesome adhesive. Once we've snuck a few guitar picks in the seam, we're nearly home-free.

  • We're happy to report that no iPads were cracked in the creation of this teardown. We haven't always been so fortunate.

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Edit Step 4  ¶ 

  • With the adhesive out of the way, we open up the iPad.

  • As expected, this stage looks no different from the previous generation.

  • Now that the hard part is out of the way, it's time for a break with a hot cup of drinking chocolate.

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Edit Step 5  ¶ 

  • As opposed to the Samsung display we found in the iPad 3, the new iPad LCD is manufactured by LG.

  • Apple has reportedly been working to move away from Samsung as a primary supplier, so this LG display is not surprising. However, Apple often relies on multiple suppliers for a single component, meaning there are quite likely other LCD manufacturers lurking inside other iPad 4s.

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Edit Step 6  ¶ 

  • Continuing to examine differences in the LCD cables…

  • Well, Apple used a different color Sharpie.

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Edit Step 7  ¶ 

  • We lift up the LCD to reveal the battery.

  • The battery is labeled with the same model number (A1389) as in the last round, so it's no surprise that it's another 3.7 V, 43 Whr package.

  • Like the iPad 3, the battery is adhered very securely to the rear case. Since batteries are consumables that wear out, the trend of glued-in, hard-to-access batteries in iPads and other Apple devices is unfortunate.

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Edit Step 8  ¶ 

  • Skipping ahead to the good stuff, we get a quick look at the biggest improvement in the iPad 4—the A6X and its supporting hardware:

    • Apple A6X Processor

    • Hynix H2JTDG8UD2MBR 16 GB NAND Flash

    • Apple 338S1116 Cirrus Logic Audio Codec

    • 343S0622-A1 Dialog Semi PMIC

    • Apple 338S1077 Cirrus Logic Class D Audio Amplifier

    • QVP TI 261 A9P2

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Edit Step 9  ¶ 

  • The backside of the board, however, boasts no dramatic improvements:

    • Broadcom BCM5974 Touch Screen Controller

    • Broadcom BCM5973A1 Touch Screen Controller

    • Texas Instruments CD3240B0 Touch Screen Line Driver

    • 2 x 4Gb Elpida LP DDR2 = 1 GB DRAM in separate packages in a 64-bit configuration

    • 2 x Fairchild BCHAH/FDMC Voltage Regulator / Reference

    • Murata 339S0171 Broadcom BCM4334 WiFi Module

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Edit Step 10  ¶ 

  • Apple didn't save any space by switching to the smaller Lightning connector (lower); rather they let the Lightning cable sit in a frame the same size as the 30-pin dock connector (upper).

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Edit Step 11  ¶ 

  • If you're new to our site, we'll let you in on a little secret: we love our 54 Bit Driver Kit. It makes quick work freeing the Lightning connector, even with a couple of hard to find screws.

  • There is a bit of adhesive holding the connector in, but nothing compared to some adhered components we've seen before.

  • Repair techs, DIY-ers, and clumsy iPad-users, rejoice! The Lightning connector is on its very own ribbon cable, meaning that procuring a replacement connector should be fairly inexpensive.

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Edit Step 12  ¶ 

  • Despite looking almost identical in this shot, we do spot one more difference between the 3rd (top) and 4th (bottom) generations: the front-facing camera!

  • We've got a 1.2MP FaceTime HD camera, with the ability to shoot 720p HD video. That's a big improvement from the .3MP FaceTime camera in the iPad 3.

  • Compared to the iPad 3, this camera is actually slightly thicker (an extra .4 mm), but it still manages to fit into the same space.

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Edit Step 13  ¶ 

  • iPad 4 Repairability Score: 2 out of 10 (10 is easiest to repair)

    • The LCD is easy to remove once the front panel is gone.

    • The battery is not soldered to the logic board, making the replacement process a tad less difficult.

    • Just like in the iPad 2 & 3, the front panel is glued to the rest of the device, greatly increasing the chances of cracking the glass when trying to remove it.

    • Gobs, gobs, and gobs of adhesive hold everything in place, including the prone-to-start-a-fire-if-punctured battery.

    • The LCD has foam sticky tape adhering it to the front panel, increasing chances of it being shattered during disassembly.

    • You can't access the front panel's connector until you remove the LCD.

Required Tools

Spudger

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Phillips #00 Screwdriver

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Plastic Opening Tools

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iOpener

$12.95 · 50+ In stock

iFixit Opening Picks set of 6

$4.95 · 50+ In stock

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Comments Comments are onturn off

home 键是最大的改变

Green Zhu, · Reply

Be careful with the home button flex!

iTiger Repair, · Reply

I know! I tore mine. Does anyone know where to get a replacement?

Aliases Poopoo,

can the home button flex be torn taking the glass out or is it if your trying to remove the flex it's self.

keith,

I assume also from because they dont comment on the glass that it is the same as the ipad 3 glass?

keith,

Can anyone confirm that only LG panels are being used?

Shaune Ng, · Reply

我觉得iPad 4就数据线接口位置变化大,如果不看接口,大体上看区别不是很大

GaoYuming, · Reply

****There is a new ribbon that is connected to the home button. Be cautious when opening the bottom left corner as to not tear it.

mazzolagregory, · Reply

Is this digitizer panel, compatible with the ipad 3gen?

luis ortiz, · Reply

the ipad3 digitizer is the same as the ipad4. I have installed three ipad4 digitizers by now and i used the same part as for the ipad3.

Simon, · Reply

Can you remove the A6X cover just like what you did in the iPad 3 teardown

Honam1021, · Reply

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