Magic Mouse Teardown

Teardown

Teardown

Teardowns provide a look inside a device and should not be used as disassembly instructions.

We're wondering what's so magical about Apple's Magic Mouse... so we're going to look inside to find out!

Want up-to-the-minute updates? Follow @ifixit on twitter.

Wired and iFixit are hosting a Sony Teardown contest. Take apart anything made by Sony, take photos, and use our editor to post a teardown. You could win a PS3 or PSP Go!

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Edit Step 1 Magic Mouse Teardown  ¶ 

  • Ladies and gentlemen, children of all ages, welcome to the Wonderful World of Gadget Magic Teardown sponsored by iFixit.

  • We have a special guest tonight in the audience. From Cupertino, California, it is our pleasure to introduce the world's first mouse to use Apple's revolutionary Multi-Touch technology, the Magic Mouse.

  • Let us, at iFixit, be the first to welcome you, Magic Mouse, to the grandest stage of them all, please just stand there and let us admire you in all your infinite glory.

Image #1

Edit Step 2  ¶ 

  • Now now Magic Mouse, no need to be modest, let us tell the audience a bit about yourself.

  • The Magic Mouse is composed of an aluminum base topped off with a smooth multitouch panel, giving it a lustrous buttonless appearance.

  • Unlike Apple's previous mouse, the Mighty Mouse, the Magic Mouse relies completely on gestures to enhance the user's experience.

  • Scroll in any direction with just one finger, swipe through web pages with just two fingers thanks to the powerful technology of momentum scrolling, where the speed is calculated by the rate of the gesture.

  • Oh Magic Mouse...you're so magical!

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Edit Step 3  ¶ 

  • For our next trick, we will need a volunteer from the audience...yes, you, Magic Mouse...well come on up!

  • Ladies and gentlemen, the following teardown features stunts performed by professionals or under the supervision of professionals. Accordingly, iFixit must insist that no-one attempt to recreate or re-enact any stunt or activity performed on this teardown.

  • With the public disclaimer out of the way, we can now begin tearing down the Magic Mouse.

  • Batteries are included. They're plain ordinary Energizer alkalines. We're surprised Steve doesn't have Apple-branded batteries, maybe he's been too busy working on other things to notice...perhaps a tablet...maybe Steve...no...yes??

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Edit Step 4  ¶ 

  • Alakazam! Wow, at $69, the Magic Mouse isn't cheap. You would think for $69 the Magic Mouse would actually be capable of performing magical acts.

  • To meet their earnings target for next quarter, Apple needs to sell about 164 million Magic Mice. (However, we've been told Apple sells some other products too). At that rate, it'll be about nine years before everyone in the world has a Magic Mouse.

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Edit Step 5  ¶ 

  • Let's get inside and find the magic amulet that gives the Magic Mouse its mighty powers. Not surprisingly, copious amounts of magical glue stand between us and our goal.

  • We used a Plastic Opening Tool to pry the mouse out of its shell.

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Edit Step 6  ¶ 

  • The glue didn't want to let go, but we overpowered it with a flick of our magic wand. Screws would have been a lot easier to get apart (and much nicer to put back together).

  • There's not much Aluminum in the mouse, we weighed just 10 grams. That's compared to 37 grams of plastic and 47 grams of batteries. Nearly half the mouse's weight comes from the two AA batteries.

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Edit Step 7  ¶ 

  • Open sarsaparilla! Open Saskatchewan! Open septuagenarian! Open saddle soap! ... OPEN SESAME! Now that was easy enough.

  • Here we receive our first glimpse of magic. (aka orange capacitive touch sensors).

  • The top of the mouse is connected to the main board and power via a single large ribbon cable.

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Edit Step 8  ¶ 

  • The top of the mouse is translucent. Maybe Apple should make a backlit mouse.

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Edit Step 9  ¶ 

  • After prying up the black plastic internal frame, we finally get an unobstructed view of the sensors.

  • From the Apple logo up, the entire surface of the mouse is covered with capacitive touch sensors.

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Edit Step 10  ¶ 

  • The brains.

  • The average mouse brain weighs .4 grams. The brains of the Magic Mouse weigh 9 grams. That means the Magic Mouse is 22.5 times smarter than your average mouse. Who knew?

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Edit Step 11  ¶ 

  • Here's the Broadcom BCM2042A4KFBGH chip that allows the Magic Mouse to talk to its host.

  • This is a BCM2042 "Advanced Wireless Keyboard/Mouse Bluetooth Chip."

  • According to Broadcom, "By integrating all components within today's mouse and keyboard into the BCM2042, low system costs can be achieved to approach the price points of legacy-wired mice and keyboards." Apparently Apple missed that memo.

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Edit Step 12  ¶ 

  • Magic Mouse, RIP. Another mouse killed in the name of science. We didn't break anything, but gluing it back together will be challenging. Update: We put it back together and it still works!

  • We'll be taking apart the iMac that came with our Magic Mouse next. Follow @ifixit on twitter and we'll keep you updated.

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Comments Comments are onturn off

I dub this teardown "Black Magic."

Miroslav Djuric, · Reply

own this mouse and so far very impressed

Nick, · Reply

Magic Mouse is not a Modest Mouse?

Brady Cabe, · Reply

Quote from brady:

Magic Mouse is not a Modest Mouse?

so I am curious what you thought you would find? A pot of gold? Of coarse its a bunch of capacitive sensors...

SteveO, · Reply

Quote from SteveO:

so I am curious what you thought you would find? A pot of gold? Of coarse its a bunch of capacitive sensors...

I agreee... LOL

guee, · Reply

Quote from guee:

I agreee... LOL

Modest Mouse is a band, of course

http://www.modestmousemusic.com/

:)

Brady Cabe, · Reply

Quote from brady:

Modest Mouse is a band, of course

http://www.modestmousemusic.com/

:)

:)) I know wat you talked,LOL, just for fun.

Physicstoys, · Reply

What's the black strip-like things on the bottom?

ramcosca, · Reply

Quote from ramcosca:

What's the black strip-like things on the bottom?

Those are the friction-reducing gliders. They let the Magic Mouse slide effortlessly over smooth surfaces, such as a desk. Ordinary mice have "feet", and the Mighty Mouse has one long light-gray strip that goes around the entire base of the mouse.

waffle911, · Reply

I was wondering why didn't they come up with a wirelessly chargeable mouse? I hate those moments that the battery just died and you lose all the sensitivity. How is the power efficiency on this? Anyone tested?

Jennyjiji, · Reply

Quote from Jennyjiji:

I was wondering why didn't they come up with a wirelessly chargeable mouse? I hate those moments that the battery just died and you lose all the sensitivity. How is the power efficiency on this? Anyone tested?

its actully pretty good

Nick, · Reply

Is that a QR code at the top? Do you have any idea of what it says?

iDunno, · Reply

Quote from iDunno:

Is that a QR code at the top? Do you have any idea of what it says?

No, it's a datamatrix code. It's most likely for inventory/warranty tracking.

mordac, · Reply

Quote from iDunno:

Is that a QR code at the top? Do you have any idea of what it says?

"Made in China".

ryan1000000, · Reply

I would love to see a higher res picture of the last (separated) shot on this step, like step 11 which is mind-blowingly awesome resolution!

Thanks for detailed teardowns, the step-by step is awesome (and you guys do such a great job, I am only opening one of these things when I don't expect to get them back together and working, I'll leave that to you when I have a problem.

Keep it up (and you are fast!).

McLuvnapple, · Reply

you guys arent funny....at all.

mrgarrison593, · Reply

"By integrating all components within today's mouse and keyboard into the BCM2042, low system costs can be achieved to approach the price points of legacy-wired mice and keyboards." Apparently Apple missed that memo."

Wow that typifies the bias strewn thought this teardown... Perhaps if they had built a mouse using the standard (inexpensive and not requiring significant R&D and engineering) couple microswitches and a optical chopper pair they could sell it for the $20-$40 that logitech sells it's wired mice.

But that is not the case is it?

Stick to the tech, haters benefit no one.

Billster, · Reply

Quote from Billster:

"By integrating all components within today's mouse and keyboard into the BCM2042, low system costs can be achieved to approach the price points of legacy-wired mice and keyboards." Apparently Apple missed that memo."

Wow that typifies the bias strewn thought this teardown... Perhaps if they had built a mouse using the standard (inexpensive and not requiring significant R&D and engineering) couple microswitches and a optical chopper pair they could sell it for the $20-$40 that logitech sells it's wired mice.

But that is not the case is it?

Stick to the tech, haters benefit no one.

Err, I hate to break it to you, but this has -one- microswitch, as well as a plain old optical chopper pair. nothing special about either of those. as far as "significant R&D and engineering" goes, capacitive tech has been around for ages, a simple array of sensors isn't anything novel.

There really isn't anything in this that justifies the ridiculous price tag.

Omega192, · Reply

Quote from Omega192:

There really isn't anything in this that justifies the ridiculous price tag.

Except the idea, I did not se a lot of devices like this one before, did you?

Exactly, and that justify the price (at least most of it…)

Amos, · Reply

I'm going to buy one. It is about the software and not the hardware.

MBD, · Reply

Quote from Omega192:

as far as "significant R&D and engineering" goes, capacitive tech has been around for ages, a simple array of sensors isn't anything novel.

And yet multi-touch has never been properly implemented until recently, with Apple and a handful of other companies finally getting it right. Don't underestimate what went into it.

There really isn't anything in this that justifies the ridiculous price tag.

Okay, but here's Logitech's current Bluetooth laser offering, and it's $59.99

http://www.logitech.com/index.cfm/mice_p...

$9 for a multi-touch surface, with the ability for future expansion in gestures and features, like the trackpads, seems like more than a fair price. Bumping up to a USB darkfield laser is $20. There's nothing new or innovative in a darkfield laser by your standards, and yet it's double the price? Clearly there's a disconnect there.

useruser, · Reply

For that price i would have expected rechargeable batteries and a powered mousepad that transmits energy without contact to the mouse. That would truly have been 'magic'.

Apple is already one of the worlds largest producers of e-waste and their production processes are not exactly 'green; either. Now add Aa batteries to that list. greenpeace will have a field day again ...

iAmAppleFree, · Reply

Quote from iAmAppleFree:

... Apple is already one of the worlds largest producers of e-waste and their production processes are not exactly 'green; either. ...

Do you have a current source for your incorrect enviro-slam? If you bother to take a look at Apple's Environment section of its website, you'll find comprehensive reports showing full life-cycle environmental impact reports. Something that is above and beyond the standard in the industry. Me thinks you were too quick and out of date (circa early 2007) with your slam.

Besides, e-waste is insignificant in the global environmental scheme. Try finding a modern landfill with an e-waste leachate problem. You can't. The problem is in the recycling of the electronic components in third world countries. Not in burying the old products.)

ReasonableGuy, · Reply

Is there a loudspeaker in it? i wonder if I could get rid of the annoying clics, and get a totally silent mouse. The old mouse had a small loudspeaker. But no software to turn it off.

magicmax, · Reply

Quote from iAmAppleFree:

For that price i would have expected rechargeable batteries and a powered mousepad that transmits energy without contact to the mouse. That would truly have been 'magic'.

Apple is already one of the worlds largest producers of e-waste and their production processes are not exactly 'green; either. Now add Aa batteries to that list. greenpeace will have a field day again ...

Well...I guess you're not an Apple customer. I am and the #$5& with Greenpeace!

vick1, · Reply

Quote from ReasonableGuy:

Do you have a current source for your incorrect enviro-slam?

Here is your proof: most of apple's stuff (ipod,iphone and even some laptops are not designed to have a user replacable battery.) Throw away and buy new...

@vick1. i hope not all apple users have your mentality.

iAmAppleFree, · Reply

just got my new iMac yesterday and love the mouse....but it IS loud when you click it!! hopefully will find a way to soften the sound

suedan, · Reply

I think that the PC people are slamming the magic mouse because they finally got an OS update from Win XP. Too bad PC still only uses buttons... suckers.

Tigerfish, · Reply

Quote from Omega192:

Err, I hate to break it to you, but this has -one- microswitch, as well as a plain old optical chopper pair. nothing special about either of those. as far as "significant R&D and engineering" goes, capacitive tech has been around for ages, a simple array of sensors isn't anything novel.

There really isn't anything in this that justifies the ridiculous price tag.

Do you know what an optical chopper pair are? They are an IR emitter/receptor pair used to track the scroll wheel rotation. I don't think this mouse has a scroll wheel (or a chopper pair)

It's surface tracking (laser) does not use a chopper pair (no mouse does)

I am a engineer (PLC electronics manufacturing) and I can tell you this is a big change (engineering and manufacturing wise) from a standard 3 button mouse. (and I note that the logitech CORDED mice using laser tracking run $25-$80 (bluetooth run $50 & $60) so the price seems dam reasonable.

R&D Engineering and getting a production run up to speed (QC) all cost lots of money (trust me)

I just get sick of (mostly poorly informed) people bashing innovative companies for having to recoup their R&D and production set up costs. If you can't (or don't want to) afford it, wait a year or two till it becomes commonplace and most of the R&D have been recouped, the price will undoubtedly drop a bit.

Billster, · Reply

Quote from Billster:

Do you know what an optical chopper pair are? They are an IR emitter/receptor pair used to track the scroll wheel rotation. I don't think this mouse has a scroll wheel (or a chopper pair)

It's surface tracking (laser) does not use a chopper pair (no mouse does)

I am a engineer (PLC electronics manufacturing) and I can tell you this is a big change (engineering and manufacturing wise) from a standard 3 button mouse. (and I note that the logitech CORDED mice using laser tracking run $25-$80 (bluetooth run $50 & $60) so the price seems dam reasonable.

R&D Engineering and getting a production run up to speed (QC) all cost lots of money (trust me)

I just get sick of (mostly poorly informed) people bashing innovative companies for having to recoup their R&D and production set up costs. If you can't (or don't want to) afford it, wait a year or two till it becomes commonplace and most of the R&D have been recouped, the price will undoubtedly drop a bit.

The prices I see on Logitech's site are $80 and $100 for their Anywhere and Performance mice with Logitech Darkfield Laser Tracking™.

For larger tear-down images, see http://www.cnblogs.com/lzhdim/news/2009/..., and don't worry if you cannot read the language (Chinese?). It includes the Magic Mouse and iMac tear-downs.

doctordon, · Reply

Quote from iAmAppleFree:

For that price i would have expected rechargeable batteries and a powered mousepad that transmits energy without contact to the mouse. That would truly have been 'magic'.

Apple is already one of the worlds largest producers of e-waste and their production processes are not exactly 'green; either. Now add Aa batteries to that list. greenpeace will have a field day again ...

Umm, dumbass, you can supply your own rechargeable AA batteries. I have 2 sets for my Mighty Mouse, one in the mouse and one at the ready.

MrBubbles, · Reply

The Broadcom chip does not seemed to do the job of capacitive sensing (finger touch sensing). There must be another chip that decode the touch sensor. Can you please post the picture for the back of the board? Or list the other chip's name. Thanks.

Martin, · Reply

Quote from Billster:

"By integrating all components within today's mouse and keyboard into the BCM2042, low system costs can be achieved to approach the price points of legacy-wired mice and keyboards." Apparently Apple missed that memo."

Wow that typifies the bias strewn thought this teardown... Perhaps if they had built a mouse using the standard (inexpensive and not requiring significant R&D and engineering) couple microswitches and a optical chopper pair they could sell it for the $20-$40 that logitech sells it's wired mice.

But that is not the case is it?

Stick to the tech, haters benefit no one.

You shouldn't complain. Here in Denmark, a Magic Mouse costs $106!!

winggoat, · Reply

Quote from Omega192:

Err, I hate to break it to you, but this has -one- microswitch, as well as a plain old optical chopper pair. nothing special about either of those. as far as "significant R&D and engineering" goes, capacitive tech has been around for ages, a simple array of sensors isn't anything novel.

There really isn't anything in this that justifies the ridiculous price tag.

Yes sure it "isn't anything novel" that's why no one has a product like this out yet...nothing novel...

go buy yourself one of those fugly prototypes by microsoft sitting on some loser bozo's staffer's desk instead.

John A, · Reply

Quote from iAmAppleFree:

Here is your proof: most of apple's stuff (iPod,iPhone and even some laptops are not designed to have a user replacable battery.) Throw away and buy new...

@vick1. i hope not all apple users have your mentality.

but you can replace it yourself you apple hater! so OWND! heck my MacBook air had a dead battery changed it it works like new:)

Nick, · Reply

"We'll be taking apart the iMac that came with our Magic Mouse next."

I'm dying over here! Get on it!!!

DUSTmurph, · Reply

I am dieing! Take that chainsaw to the iMac!

Toushi, · Reply

Quote from DUSTmurph:

"We'll be taking apart the iMac that came with our Magic Mouse next." I'm dying over here! Get on it!!!

Quote from Toushi:

I am dieing! Take that chainsaw to the iMac!

Here you go.

Kyle Wiens, · Reply

So the little board is the power switch and has contacts to the main board? Does the firmware on the broadcom chip read the touch sensors or is there another MCU hidden somewhere, if so, what is it?

mobbarley, · Reply

What about pictures of the back of the board.

BCBC, · Reply

Well, thank you for taking my Twitter suggestion to heart so quickly. But I see an unidentified and unclose-upped chip there at the bottom of the board assembly...what might IT be..

Jadawin, · Reply

Out of curiosity, would like to inquire who is the manufacturer of the laser sensor. Can't see to see it on the pics.

sdchew, · Reply

I want an Apple mouse which uses an inductive pad to charge it. None of this environmentally unsound replaceable battery nonsense. How cool would that be? Make an inductive dock which can charge an iPhone, a laptop, a mouse, etc... now *that* would be doing something interesting.

Diggsby, · Reply

Can someone confirm if any part of the internal electronics is in contact with the aluminum bottom case, as i'm constantly getting a strange tingling feeling in my fingers when i use this mouse and it goes away if i take the batteries out.

Rob C, · Reply

Quote from Rob C:

Can someone confirm if any part of the internal electronics is in contact with the aluminum bottom case, as i'm constantly getting a strange tingling feeling in my fingers when i use this mouse and it goes away if i take the batteries out.

OldNavy, · Reply

Quote from OldNavy:

OK so I screwed up my first post ... this is for Rob C - don't touch the bottom. I don't get the tingle from mine.

And for everyone else who has an issue with Apple "stuff" - if you want a Cadillac, you pay extra. Pretty simple. I've been using non-Cadillac equipment for the past 30 years. I finally made the switch and wonder, as do most switchers, why I waited so long. Cheers

OldNavy, · Reply

Quote from OldNavy:

By bottom I was referring to the whole aluminum part, which you have to hold to use it.

the only explanation is that the outer case is somehow grounded and theres a tiny bit of static or something going though it.

Rob C, · Reply

Quote from Rob C:

Can someone confirm if any part of the internal electronics is in contact with the aluminum bottom case, as i'm constantly getting a strange tingling feeling in my fingers when i use this mouse and it goes away if i take the batteries out.

Possibly the onset of Carpal-tunnel syndrome?

sp33dwagon, · Reply

Quote from djLot3k:

Possibly the onset of Carpal-tunnel syndrome?

seriously though, just take it to the apple store they'll give you a replacement.

sp33dwagon, · Reply

Quote from djLot3k:

Possibly the onset of Carpal-tunnel syndrome?

If it is using the same technology as the glass touch pad on the MacBook, then no you're not imagine the tingling. I have felt it too. I for one am amazed by the touch technology in the magic mouse and it is hands and feet above anything Logitech or MacAlly can come up with.

Newton63, · Reply

The iMac that came with the magic mouse? I'd say the iMac is the main event.

jsbrock, · Reply

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