Nexus One Glass Replacement

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Member-Contributed Guide

Member-Contributed Guide

An awesome member of our community made this guide. It is not managed by iFixit staff.

How to replace the Glass (or the display) of a Google Nexus 1.

This guide depends upond the "teardown" - it shows only the few extra steps that are missing after the end of the teardown.

Image #1

Edit Step 1 Nexus One Teardown  ¶ 

  • The Nexus One, manufactured by HTC, is the latest and greatest Android phone. It sports:

    • A 1 GHz Qualcomm (QCOM) Snapdragon processor.

    • A 3.7" 480x800 widescreen WVGA AMOLED display.

    • A 5MP digital camera w/ LED flash that also records .mp4 video.

    • 802.11n wireless capability for when you can't depend on 3G.

    • 7 hours of 3G talk time from a removable 3.7V, 1400 mAh lithium battery.

  • The box's color scheme kind of looks like Google's.

  • Pawning apps on the clear plastic protective sleeve? Guess the app store really is that desperate.

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Edit Step 2  ¶ 

  • Droid, meet Nexus One. Anyone else see the transition from Terminator to T-1000?

  • iFixit's Android family. Darwin would agree that progress has been made.

Image #1

Edit Step 3  ¶ 

  • The unbelievably easy task of removing the plastic rear cover gives access to the replaceable battery. Hey Apple, take notes!

  • Inside the battery compartment you can see:

    • The 5MP camera lens

    • LED flash bulb

    • External speaker

    • The warranty-killing VOID sticker

Image #1

Edit Step 4  ¶ 

  • Warranty = VOID. No turning back now.

  • This phone is very nicely put together. After removing three screws and prying with a plastic opening tool, the battery tray comes right out.

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Edit Step 5  ¶ 

  • The upper circuit board is held in place by another Phillips screw.

  • After removing the screw, maneuver the upper board past the two metal clips holding it in place and lift it out of the phone body.

  • The large black-coated foil section is the data connection between the two main circuit boards.

Image #1

Edit Step 6  ¶ 

  • After some trying moments with a few tools of destruction, we figured out the bottom cover can simply be popped off with a plastic opening tool.

  • Guess what? We found more screws.

  • This phone uses many foil antennas attached to the several plastic internal frame pieces.

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Edit Step 7  ¶ 

  • With a quick pry of the plastic opening tool, we found that the black plastic frame slightly envelops the lower side of the logic board.

  • And just like that, the plastic frame snaps off, revealing the lower logic board.

  • It's quite a colorful phone on the inside. We've got oranges, greens, yellows, dark grays, and all sorts of fun stuff!

Image #1

Edit Step 8  ¶ 

  • We had to take care of one more Phillips screw.

  • After that, the logic board assembly slowly-but-surely slid out from the rest of the phone.

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Edit Step 9  ¶ 

  • The Nexus features a 3.7-inch (diagonal) widescreen WVGA AMOLED touchscreen.

  • This is the second device we've taken apart with an OLED display. The Zune HD we took apart last September also featured a Samsung-branded OLED display.

  • The Nexus display features a resolution of 480 x 800. That's a few less pixels than Motorola's Droid (480 x 854), but far more than the iPhone 3GS (320 x 480).

Image #1

Edit Step 10  ¶ 

  • Here's what looks to be the Synaptics (SYNA) touchscreen controller.

  • The chip is labeled T1007A, 2 0927, AMP08P. It controls the ClearPad 2000 series capacitive dualtouch sensor used in this phone.

  • We haven't been able to find any specifics on this chip. If you can help out with details, let us know!

Image #1

Edit Step 11  ¶ 

  • A list of the chips we've identified so far:

    • Samsung 943 KA100O015M-AJTT

    • Skyworks (SWKS) SKY77336 GSM power amplifier (labeled SKY77336-21 3888833 1P 0940 MX)

    • Qualcomm (QCOM) PM7540 power management chip (labeled PM7540 AH43510 C4944001)

    • The TI (TXN) TPS65023 integrated Power Management IC (labeled TPS65023 TI 9AJ P675 G4)

Image #1

Edit Step 12  ¶ 

  • Qualcomm (QCOM) appears to be the big winner on the Nexus. We've found at least three of their chips in here already.

  • On the left is a RTR6285 RF transceiver.

  • The large chip on the right is the nexus of the Nexus. It's a Qualcom (QCOM) QSD8250 "Snapdragon" 1 GHz ARM processor.

  • The small chip between the two Qualcomm (QCOM) chips is an Audience A1026 voice processor, including ambient noise cancellation.

Image #1

Edit Step 13  ¶ 

  • What have we here?

  • It's a plane, it's a bird, no... it's smaller than a dime? What are you?

  • It's the LED flash.

Image #1

Edit Step 14  ¶ 

  • The Bluetooth and 802.11n wireless is provided by a Broadcom (BRCM) BCM4329 chip.

  • The 802.11n capability gives the Nexus an advantage over the iPhone 3GS, which only has 802.11g connectivity. The Broadcom (BRCM) chip in the Nexus is the same chip we found in Apple's newest (3rd generation) iPod touch.

  • The package is labeled BCM4329EKUBG CD0942 P21 937322 SEA

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Edit Step 15  ¶ 

  • Three more chips.

  • Unfortunately these were located underneath soldered EMI covers. For the sake of science and gadget lovers everywhere, we had to be a little forceful to get these covers off.

  • Using the Nexus One post-teardown just became very iffy. Previous to this step, we felt good about its functionality, but no longer...

Image #1

Edit Step 16  ¶ 

  • There you go, folks...

  • Hopefully our kryptonite wasn't too much for the Nexus "Superphone" One.

Image #1

Edit Step 17 Glass  ¶ 

  • Slip out the display+glass compound from the body. seen on the right hand side here, the OLED Display, the Glass and it's frame are still connected.

  • To separate the display, we have to cut the gray fabric in the places indicated

Image #1

Edit Step 18  ¶ 

  • Unplug the strip (shown in the blue rectangle)

  • Unplug the black cord (shown in the red circle)

  • Unplug three more plugs (not marked)

Image #1

Edit Step 19  ¶ 

  • Separate the OLED display (not shown here!)

  • Seperate glass from Frame. This is glued in, so you need a bit of force

  • there is one thingy thats connected to the glass and is threaded through a hole in the frame - don't cut / tear that, but un-thread it!

Image #1

Edit Step 20  ¶ 

  • put the Trackball back in it's place: the 4 sides are not the same, one is different. Let this side point outwards

If you don't end up with 2 screws left over, you did something wrong. No, no, just kidding: please edit and correct this guide if you find out where I went wrong.

For more information, check out the Nexus One device page.

Required Tools

Phillips #00 Screwdriver

$5.95 · 50+ In stock

T4 Torx Screwdriver

$4.95 · 20 In stock

Plastic Opening Tools

$2.95 · 50+ In stock

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Portable Anti-Static Mat

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Comments Comments are onturn off

[PLAGIARISM WARNING!!]

sina.com.hk has stolen pictures from your report

and made its own water print logo on them!!

http://mobile.sina.com.hk/cgi-bin/nw/sho...

got your permission yet? I don't think so!!

alanbird, · Reply

Did you save the carrying pouch it came with? I lost mine. I'll pay $10 for a new one...

RoohBear, · Reply

Thanks for the IMEI! I'll be cloning your phone now :)

WillyDavidK, · Reply

If the antennas are on the bottom, the reception would be reduced everytime the phone is grabbed.

Just like the iPhone, when you grab it the hand reduces the reception thus the iPhone has bad reception.

Inino, · Reply

The copper foil isn't antenna, that's shielding to fix a sensitivity issue :)

pookey5, · Reply

The phone looks like it is better designed than the iPhone 3GS by Foxconn, good job HTC.

Willyau, · Reply

Quote from Willyau:

The phone looks like it is better designed than the iPhone 3GS by Foxconn, good job HTC.

Your right, when seen from disassembly, but for assembly I guess otherwise. Still an amazing job.

It good to see that manufactures and designers and are willing to spend time to do some quality in their works.

lord anubis, · Reply

how easy/hard is it to remove the camera from the board? is it only by de-soldering>?

Eysham, · Reply

I wonder how hard it would be to change out the antenna? That's what's stopping AT&T 3G freqs.

scottricketts, · Reply

I'm assuming you're referring to the T-Mobile version of this phone. No, it's not just the antenna that's different, but the radio as well. They both have to be matched.

Mike Trieu,

Quote from Inino:

If the antennas are on the bottom, the reception would be reduced everytime the phone is grabbed.

Just like the iPhone, when you grab it the hand reduces the reception thus the iPhone has bad reception.

it's done out of consideration because but throat cancer is much easier to manage than a brain tumor is...

TheQuestion, · Reply

Is it easy to get that bottom cover back on after popping it off?

Curt Mercadante, · Reply

Can you see where the 3 copper points on the bottom go to? there is a hole rather then a 4th and I'm wondering if those points are for power only or if there's audio/something else.

Curt, · Reply

Quote from Eysham:

how easy/hard is it to remove the camera from the board? is it only by de-soldering>?

I need to know this!!! No cameras at work :(

seakintruth, · Reply

Quote from Inino:

If the antennas are on the bottom, the reception would be reduced everytime the phone is grabbed.

Just like the iPhone, when you grab it the hand reduces the reception thus the iPhone has bad reception.

The human body doesn't attenuate reception much at the frequencies used by mobile phones. By placing the antennas at the bottom, it reduces interference with hearing aids, because the antennas are farther away from the electronics in the hearing aid.

There may be other reasons, but those are the ones I know of.

Jonathan Moore, · Reply

Quote from pookey5:

The copper foil isn't antenna, that's shielding to fix a sensitivity issue :)

Can anyone tell me exactly where the GSM/3G HSDPA antenna is located in this teardown? I know the cellular antenna on the nexus is located in the bottom of the phone. but where EXACTLY is it on these pics? its not totally clear or labelled anywhere. Thanks.

Roger Podacter, · Reply

Quote from Roger Podacter:

Can anyone tell me exactly where the GSM/3G HSDPA antenna is located in this teardown? I know the cellular antenna on the nexus is located in the bottom of the phone. but where EXACTLY is it on these pics? its not totally clear or labelled anywhere. Thanks.

Look carefully at Step 7, second picture. The piece in the technician's hand contains the antenna. It is a black, flat metal piece riveted to that small module, with white writing on it. A similar style of antenna is used in the T-Mobile G1. The little round connector is an antenna connector. If I had to guess, there's probably a connector on the underside of that module to connect it to the antenna connector on the board.

Jonathan Moore, · Reply

Quote from Jonathan Moore:

Look carefully at Step 7, second picture. The piece in the technician's hand contains the antenna. It is a black, flat metal piece riveted to that small module, with white writing on it. A similar style of antenna is used in the T-Mobile G1. The little round connector is an antenna connector. If I had to guess, there's probably a connector on the underside of that module to connect it to the antenna connector on the board.

OK thank you, that makes total sense. there are many complaints about poor reception on the nexus when you cover the bottom of the phone, which makes sense since you are covering the antenna. i've learned to spread my pinky about 1 inch apart, leaving this exact area open, and the signal pops right back up. this picture confirms it is located EXACTLY in that spot. good work!

Roger Podacter, · Reply

You can see the three internal contacts that line up with the external contacts of the bottom of the phone. Does anyone know which of those two is for charging. Ones has to be 5V and another Ground.

garfnodie, · Reply

Quote from garfnodie:

You can see the three internal contacts that line up with the external contacts of the bottom of the phone. Does anyone know which of those two is for charging. Ones has to be 5V and another Ground.

Never mind, found the info.

If anyone else is interested in the same thing, just check out this thread over at XDA.

http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthre...

garfnodie, · Reply

I wonder if you can tell where is the rattling noise come from?

http://www.google.com/support/forum/p/an...

Joe Lin, · Reply

No, I'm almost certain the rattling noise comes from the camera autofocus mechanism. You can hear it when you use any camera/barcode application.

Mike Trieu,

Have you further disassembled the front housing part?

How are the icons beneath the screen lit?

It would also be interesting to see the maschined aluminium part from the inside.

Nemo, · Reply

Is that an I2C connector? Wonder if you can attach a different screen to this :)

Lou Granger, · Reply

The Nexus One uses a ClearPad 2000 series capacitive dualtouch sensor.

Alex Daves, · Reply

Does someone know the information and specification of the resistors which are over the chip? RP4-RP7

Evgeny, · Reply

Do you think those other PA's next to the Skyworks part are from Avago? Who does the PA's for t-mobiles 3G?

PhoneGuy, · Reply

The small black chip at very right side is AKM AK8973 Electronic compass chip.

AK8973 product page

KelvinChen, · Reply

Quote from PhoneGuy:

Do you think those other PA's next to the Skyworks part are from Avago? Who does the PA's for t-mobiles 3G?

The 77191 next to the SKY77336 is another Skyworks part, a WCDMA/HSDPA power amp:

http://www.skyworksinc.com/Product.aspx?...

UKA, · Reply

Any information about the camera or lens?

Steve , · Reply

The chip at the upper right corner of the Snapdragon is an Atmel Mega88, microcontroller. Spec sheet describes it as an 8-bit AVR RISC microcontroller w/ 8K programmable flash memory.

Seth G, · Reply

I can report that the Audience chip does its job quite impressively. With the last two phones I've had (BlackBerry Bold 9000 and Sony-Ericsson W810i), talking in my loud car on the freeway with a wired headset (with omnidirectional mic) resulted in people telling me to call them when I arrived at my destination because the noise was too overwhelming for them to hear me. Yesterday I called those same people from the freeway and they said I sounded totally clear. Good work, Audience!

iDiaz, · Reply

Quote from Seth G:

The chip at the upper right corner of the Snapdragon is an Atmel Mega88, microcontroller. Spec sheet describes it as an 8-bit AVR RISC microcontroller w/ 8K programmable flash memory.

Seth - The Atmel chip is most likely used for the cap touch buttons along the bottom of the phone, and possibly for other touch features such as haptics, light sensors or other cap sense user interface features.

Of course I could only verify this if someone sends me one to play with ;)

John, · Reply

Two contacts, strange shaped copper fills. Antenna, probably 2.4GHz.

pookey5, · Reply

It would help to see the other side of this board, that side is just the connecter side.

Yorik, · Reply

Nope, just the LED flash

Pins 2,4,6,8,10 to one side, 1,3,5,7,9 to other side of LED through multiple via's.

fred, · Reply

Technically speaking, the chip DOES support 802.11N, but it is NOT supported by the supplied driver.

Alex Daves, · Reply

Animals, your just animals. Some gentle heat from a blow-torch and you'd have the screening cans off quicker than Tiger in a nightclub.

bcsyn, · Reply

Quote from bcsyn:

Animals, your just animals. Some gentle heat from a blow-torch and you'd have the screening cans off quicker than Tiger in a nightclub.

Exactly what I was thinking... made me cringe a bit

tony, · Reply

just look at page 3, and find something interesting. On the left most is Capella CM3605 light and proximity sensor. It's Taiwan based IC design company.

terry , · Reply

Any idea which chip used for audio driver? Thx

Dan, · Reply

did you kill it?

Gery, · Reply

so my question is...will the trackball get dirty and look ugly/gross like all those blackberrys i see around?

krobinson5, · Reply

Just wanted to give some feedback about this a couple years later. Nope, it doesn't look gross in the slightest and this is after HEAVY, real-life, everyday use/abuse. It's still as optically pristine as the day I unboxed! it :)

Mike Trieu,

Quote from krobinson5:

so my question is...will the trackball get dirty and look ugly/gross like all those blackberrys i see around?

Feels just like a BlackBerry trackball, but only time will tell...

Miroslav Djuric, · Reply

Quote from krobinson5:

so my question is...will the trackball get dirty and look ugly/gross like all those blackberrys i see around?

The great think about trackballs it that they can be replaced pretty easilly, the one in my blackberry comes out with by popping the little metallic ring that surrounds it off, than it just falls out, and the ball itself, and rollers are a seperate assembly than the electronics, and light making for easy(er) replacement, but there wasn't much detail here about this trackball in the nexus, but it looks similar to the one in my blackberry.

Chris Green, · Reply

Quote from Chris Green:

The great think about trackballs it that they can be replaced pretty easilly, the one in my blackberry comes out with by popping the little metallic ring that surrounds it off, than it just falls out, and the ball itself, and rollers are a seperate assembly than the electronics, and light making for easy(er) replacement, but there wasn't much detail here about this trackball in the nexus, but it looks similar to the one in my blackberry.

And after some inspection, the ball/roller assembly looks similar, if not identical, to the one in my pearl, and may be a universal part.

Chris Green, · Reply

So maybe it's just me, but the board in this picture (top row, second from the right) definitely seems to resemble a miniature Android.

Jeff, · Reply

Quote from Chris Green:

And after some inspection, the ball/roller assembly looks similar, if not identical, to the one in my pearl, and may be a universal part.

I pretty sure after looking at the pictures from the teardown that it looks like the trackball from the blackberrys. Although, there doesn't look like there is an easy way of getting it out easily from the looks of it.

Quote from Miroslav Djuric:

Feels just like a BlackBerry trackball, but only time will tell...

That is true. Hopefully good cause I really want this phone. It looks awesome.

krobinson5, · Reply

Quote from Jeff:

So maybe it's just me, but the board in this picture (top row, second from the right) definitely seems to resemble a miniature Android.

HA it totally does! Nice!

krobinson5, · Reply

Is the screen glass like the iPhone or plsatic?

Alex Neil, · Reply

Quote from Alex Neil:

Is the screen glass like the iPhone or plsatic?

Sorry - I just registered to add my own 2 queries, then the Add Comment window disappeared, so hopefully my 2 questions seen here:

1) Screen glass: I wondered if it was the tough 'Gorrila glass' reported by Engadget as used in the Droid and dell Adamo ?

2) The Broadcom Radio chip has integral FM Radio (Rx & Tx), which the Nokia N900 uses to allow streaming of music to a Car Radio or your home hi-fi. the iTouch also uses same chip. Why is this hasn't his phone got FM Radio listed in the spec ? Radio is v. useful for getting local info when travelling out of range of 3G. Does anyone know whats needed to get the FM Radio to work ?

will2, · Reply

Quote from will2:

Sorry - I just registered to add my own 2 queries, then the Add Comment window disappeared, so hopefully my 2 questions seen here:

1) Screen glass: I wondered if it was the tough 'Gorrila glass' reported by Engadget as used in the Droid and dell Adamo ?

2) The Broadcom Radio chip has integral FM Radio (Rx & Tx), which the Nokia N900 uses to allow streaming of music to a Car Radio or your home hi-fi. the iTouch also uses same chip. Why is this hasn't his phone got FM Radio listed in the spec ? Radio is v. useful for getting local info when travelling out of range of 3G. Does anyone know whats needed to get the FM Radio to work ?

The only other Android phone that supports FM radio is the HTC Tattoo so this is a good question. I'm not sure but I don't think FM support is currently part of the core Android build and might just be something that HTC have developed and are reserving for their own HTC Sense powered phones

Paddy, · Reply

Quote from will2:

Sorry - I just registered to add my own 2 queries, then the Add Comment window disappeared, so hopefully my 2 questions seen here:

1) Screen glass: I wondered if it was the tough 'Gorrila glass' reported by Engadget as used in the Droid and dell Adamo ?

2) The Broadcom Radio chip has integral FM Radio (Rx & Tx), which the Nokia N900 uses to allow streaming of music to a Car Radio or your home hi-fi. the iTouch also uses same chip. Why is this hasn't his phone got FM Radio listed in the spec ? Radio is v. useful for getting local info when travelling out of range of 3G. Does anyone know whats needed to get the FM Radio to work ?

Dutch Daun, · Reply

Quote from will2:

Sorry - I just registered to add my own 2 queries, then the Add Comment window disappeared, so hopefully my 2 questions seen here:

1) Screen glass: I wondered if it was the tough 'Gorrila glass' reported by Engadget as used in the Droid and dell Adamo ?

2) The Broadcom Radio chip has integral FM Radio (Rx & Tx), which the Nokia N900 uses to allow streaming of music to a Car Radio or your home hi-fi. the iTouch also uses same chip. Why is this hasn't his phone got FM Radio listed in the spec ? Radio is v. useful for getting local info when travelling out of range of 3G. Does anyone know whats needed to get the FM Radio to work ?

FYI The Nokia N78, 79 and 97 all have a very good FM transmitter on board. This item could be a reason for me to switch to the Nexus as i use it very often.

Dutch Daun, · Reply

I assume you guys just got the phone to take it apart, and since you're done, i'll take it off your hands for further testing xD....... but in all seriousness..........will it blend???

DUSTmurph, · Reply

Any chance of you guys tracing the audio path back to the DAC and posting some ID? It would be fanschmastic to grab some I2C or something.. or even just bypass the usual iddy biddy liddew caps. =]

ruZZ, · Reply

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