Content Licensing

Licensing ¶ 

All iFixit content is licensed under the open source Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 license.

Original Author ¶ 

Materials you submit to iFixit must be from one of three sources:

  1. Content you own the copyright to because you produced it yourself.
  2. Content that is in the public domain.
  3. Content that is licensed under a compatible open source license.

When you submit content to iFixit, you retain full copyright to your materials, and you can use your content in any way you like, including using it for commercial purposes and distributing it to other sites.

By submitting content to http://www.ifixit.com, you give iFixit nonexclusive rights to republish and relicense the work. iFixit may use the material and can license it to other parties without prior consent from the original author.

Press ¶ 

Without specific permission, members of the press may use three photos per story (with attribution and a link back to iFixit). More generous press licensing is easily obtainable by emailing miro at ifixit dot com.

Everyone ¶ 

We license all content under the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike license. Everyone is free to republish, share, and remix our manuals as long as they attribute the source link, use it for a noncommercial purpose, and distribute any modifications of the work under a similar license.

FAQ ¶ 

What’s Creative Commons? ¶ 

The Creative Commons organization was created by a group including Lawrence Lessig, a legal scholar (and long-time iFixit user!) who solved the need to provide a flexible open content licensing in situations like ours, where we want our content to be as free as possible.

What if I want to improve your guides? ¶ 

Great! Go right ahead. You can edit all of our repair manuals— just use the edit link on every page. You are also welcome to copy them elsewhere and modify them, but the improvements will reach more people if we pool our efforts.

Can I translate your manuals into (German, French, etc.)? ¶ 

You would not believe how often we get offers to translate our repair manuals. There is a huge pent-up demand for localized repair documentation. We plan to make that happen. iFixit has built-in internationalization support, but it’s not quite done yet.

Right now, the framework (navigational elements) have been translated by humans into German, Spanish, and French. However, guides are only available with machine translations. We know that machine translations aren't ideal, and we're working on setting up the infrastructure needed to have guides be translated by humans.

To be honest, the features needed for human guide translations probably won’t be done until summer of 2014. In the meantime, there are three things you can do:

  1. Translate our manuals and post them on your site. You can do this right now, and as long as you comply with the attribution and noncommercial aspects of the license, you’re free to do whatever you like.
  2. Sign up to be a translator. We’ll be pulling people from this list to alpha-test our internationalization platform.
  3. Promote iFixit inside your country / region. The more demand we have for a given language, the sooner we will be able to support it.

Why do you restrict commercial use? ¶ 

We admit it — we have to pay the bills. Selling parts is how we do that. We want to be able to afford to write new manuals, and the noncommercial requirement allows us to do that. We do grant usage licenses to commercial entities, so contact us with any inquiries.

What’s the licensing for journalists? ¶ 

The Creative Commons BY-NC-SA license does not have specific support for journalists, but we are very willing to freely license our content to journalists. Reporters are free to use up to three attributed photos per story without contacting us. More generous licensing is readily available by contacting us, and we are almost always willing to grant journalists the same rights as noncommercial users.

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