0

Score

Avatar
Nick
24.8k

Asked

How safe is it to reflow boards in the oven?

History

I have been planning on buying a DV9000 on eBay or craigslist like mine with a bad screen and GPU to steal a motherboard

In general, how safe is the oven for reflowing or am I better off using a toaster oven just for reflowing

I have been using a heatgun for a while and still do, but the DV9000 series tends to need this "reflow" done differently in most cases to make them last

People will try anything to reflow, although I only use dodgy methods on junk

Now I see people using lighters(anyone here listen to bruno mars will recognize this as a song) to reflow!

Edited by: Nick ( )

Post Answer

1

Score

Avatar
Chris Green
21.5k

Answered

Accepted Answer

PermalinkHistory

I would just recommend using a heatgun. I've been reflowing Xbox 360's and PS3's for years now. The trick to it is to "Preheat" the board first by passing over the whole thing on low heat for 2 minutes, then use high heat on the GPU/CPU and keep the gun moving the whole time. You start damaging components when you keep the heatgun in the same spot for too long, so don't just keep the heatgun on the GPU chip the whole time.

I've even seen people use lighters to reflow

Nick,

3

Score

Avatar
netzbangalore
85

Answered

PermalinkHistory

No matter how you do you cant get more life by doing reflow's if you use a oven you will be melting all the other components as well. you could try replacing the card using a BGA reflow machine or a good long time fix would be replacing it with a new mother board, if you use a used mother board you will be again having the same issues.

I know the key, people say 385, I will do 350 or 325 for 5 minutes

Nick,

trouble with an oven is that you really can't regulate the temperature and keep it constant. As soon as you open the door to put the board in the temp drops. If you've nothing to lose then try it, but I think netz is giving good advice.

pollytintop,

0

Score

Avatar
Nate Phillips
1

Answered

PermalinkHistory

I've done this at home with a small solder torch. It helps to add some weight to the surface of the GPU before heating, i.e., a stack of nickels atop a dab of thermal paste.

0

Score

Avatar
sweetdreams97
1

Answered

PermalinkHistory

ive done about 3-4 reflows on mine so far, and let me tell you, dumb as it seems the oven method is easiest to perform and has had the best effect! first couple of times i used a pen torch and lazer thermometer, which is a pain in the &@!. you have to be really good and experienced with this kind of work- hold the torch close enough to transfer the heat well, but not too close so it doesnt keep going out, move it around so not to heat one spot, but not too fast either, coordinate this with taking the measurements using the gun in your other hand.. you get the idea. theres a video of a repair shop doing this on youtube, according to them you have to heat it to just over 200 celsius for it to work, and thats &%%* near impossible with a tiny torch. i got it pretty close after a good 5-10 minutes of mucking around with it, but even then parts of the chip were cooler while others were hotter, its really hard to get it even. despite this fact it still worked for a couple of months each time but then quit on me after. then i lost the thermometer and my torch lol. so i threw it in the oven. 210 celsius is 420 farenheight, i thought that was pretty funny ;) couple of weeks later it quit on me again. i repeated this over, except that time i forgot the #!&# thing in the oven for like 10-15 minutes, instead of the 5 minutes i did for the first time! well sometimes mistakes lead to the greatest discoveries lol. some of that black film that is stuck on to places curled up and melted but otherwise nothing happened. these things can really take heat! i put it back together and have been using it for over half a year now with no problems. my conclusion to all this is that it only works for a limited time because most people do not get it hot enough or long enough for the proper effect to take place, and the heat does not distribute evenly throughout the whole chip and all its connections. which of course is understandable as nobody wants to screw up their machine, even though its already screwed up to begin with. i used to be the same way, but through all this learned to stop fearing losing that stupid motherboard, seriously whats the big deal, its already broken!

Add Your Answer

View Statistics:

Today: 3

This Week: 22

This Month: 171

All Time: 5,759